104 Klymene

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104 Klymene
Discovery
Discovered by James Craig Watson
Discovery date 13 September 1868
Designations
MPC designation (104) Klymene
Pronunciation /ˈklɪmɪn/
1893 Q[1]
Main belt
Orbital characteristics[2]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 130.58 yr (47693 d)
Aphelion 3.6499 AU (546.02 Gm)
Perihelion 2.65525 AU (397.220 Gm)
3.15256 AU (471.616 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.15775
5.60 yr (2044.5 d)
16.67 km/s
101.498°
0° 10m 33.888s / day
Inclination 2.7905°
41.698°
32.134°
Earth MOID 1.66901 AU (249.680 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 1.63907 AU (245.201 Gm)
TJupiter 3.186
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 123.68±3.1 km
Mass 2.0×1018 kg
Equatorial surface gravity
0.0346 m/s²
Equatorial escape velocity
0.0654 km/s
8.984 h (0.3743 d)
0.0568±0.003
Temperature ~157 K
C
8.27

104 Klymene is a large, dark Themistian asteroid that was discovered by J. C. Watson on September 13, 1868, and named after one of the many Clymenes in Greek mythology.[3] It is classified as a C-type asteroid, indicating it probably has a carbonaceous composition, the spectra indicates the presence of aqueous-altered minerals on the surface[4] based upon a sharp feature at a wavelength of 3 μm, and, as of 2015, is the only member of the Themis family found to show this absorption.[5]

Based upon measurements made using adaptive optics at the W. M. Keck Observatory, this object may have a bi-lobed shape with a length of 163 ± 3 km and width of 103 ± 5 km, for an average dimension of 133 km.[6] This asteroid is located near the region of the Themis family but itself considered a background asteroid using HCM-analysis .[7] It is listed as a member of the Hecuba group of asteroids that orbit near the 2:1 mean-motion resonance with Jupiter.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bowen, Eliza A. (1893), "Visualizing the Earth's annual motion", Popular Astronomy, 1: 178−179, Bibcode:1893PA......1..178B. 
  2. ^ Yeomans, Donald K., "104 Klymene", JPL Small-Body Database Browser, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, retrieved 12 May 2016. 
  3. ^ Dictionary of minor planet names. p. 25. International Astronomical Union. 2003. Springer
  4. ^ Fornasier, S.; et al. (February 1999), "Spectroscopic comparison of aqueous altered asteroids with CM2 carbonaceous chondrite meteorites", Astronomy and Astrophysics Supplement Series, 135 (1): 65–73, Bibcode:1999A&AS..135...65F, doi:10.1051/aas:1999161. 
  5. ^ Hargrove, Kelsey D.; et al. (July 2015), "Asteroid (90) Antiope: Another icy member of the Themis family?", Icarus, 254: 150−156, Bibcode:2015Icar..254..150H, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2015.03.008. 
  6. ^ Marchis, F.; et al. (November 2006), "Shape, size and multiplicity of main-belt asteroids. I. Keck Adaptive Optics survey", Icarus, 185 (1), pp. 39–63, Bibcode:2006Icar..185...39M, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2006.06.001, PMC 2600456Freely accessible, PMID 19081813. 
  7. ^ Moore, Patrick; Rees, Robin, eds. (2011), "Patrick Moore's Data Book of Astronomy", Patrick Moore's Data Book of Astronomy by Patrick Moore and Robin Rees. Cambridge University Press (2nd ed.), Cambridge University Press: 165, Bibcode:2011pmdb.book.....M, ISBN 9781139495226. 
  8. ^ McDonald, Sophia Levy (June 1948), "General perturbations and mean elements, with representations of 35 minor planets of the Hecuba group", Astronomical Journal, 53, p. 199, Bibcode:1948AJ.....53..199M, doi:10.1086/106097. 

External links[edit]