106 Dione

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106 Dione
Discovery
Discovered by James Craig Watson
Discovery date 10 October 1868
Designations
MPC designation (106) Dione
Named after
Dione
Main belt
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 145.03 yr (52972 d)
Aphelion 3.7032 AU (553.99 Gm)
Perihelion 2.64584 AU (395.812 Gm)
3.17451 AU (474.900 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.16653
5.66 yr (2065.9 d)
16.61 km/s
51.5257°
0° 10m 27.336s / day
Inclination 4.5972°
62.163°
329.725°
Earth MOID 1.65175 AU (247.098 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 1.73379 AU (259.371 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.175
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 146.59±2.8 km[1]
147.17 ± 3.34[2] km
Mass (3.06 ± 1.54) × 1018 kg[2]
Mean density
1.83 ± 0.92[2] g/cm3
Equatorial surface gravity
0.0410 m/s²
Equatorial escape velocity
0.0775 km/s
16.26 h (0.678 d)[1]
16.26 ± 0.02 h[3]
0.0893±0.003
Temperature ~156 K
G (Tholen)
Cgh (Bus)[4]
7.41

106 Dione is a large main-belt asteroid. It probably has a composition similar to 1 Ceres, it was discovered by J. C. Watson on October 10, 1868,[5] and named after Dione, a Titaness in Greek mythology who was sometimes said to have been the mother of Aphrodite, the Greek goddess of love and beauty. It is listed as a member of the Hecuba group of asteroids that orbit near the 2:1 mean-motion resonance with Jupiter.[6]

Dione was observed to occult a dim star on January 19, 1983, by observers in Denmark, Germany and the Netherlands. A diameter of 147 ± 3 km was deduced,[7] closely matching the value acquired by the IRAS satellite.[citation needed]

Measurements made with the IRAS observatory give a diameter of 169.92 ± 7.86 km and a geometric albedo of 0.07 ± 0.01. By comparison, the MIPS photometer on the Spitzer Space Telescope gives a diameter of 168.72 ± 8.89 km and a geometric albedo of 0.07 ± 0.01. When the asteroid was observed occulting a star, the results showed a diameter of 176.7 ± 0.4 km.[8]

Photometric observations of this asteroid collected during 2004–2005 show a rotation period of 16.26 ± 0.02 hours with a brightness variation of 0.08 ± 0.02 magnitude.[3]

One of Saturn's satellites is also named Dione.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Yeomans, Donald K., "106 Dione", JPL Small-Body Database Browser, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, retrieved 12 May 2016. 
  2. ^ a b c Carry, B. (December 2012), "Density of asteroids", Planetary and Space Science, 73, pp. 98–118, arXiv:1203.4336Freely accessible, Bibcode:2012P&SS...73...98C, doi:10.1016/j.pss.2012.03.009.  See Table 1.
  3. ^ a b Pray, Donald P. (September 2005), "Lightcurve analysis of asteroids 106, 752, 847, 1057, 1630, 1670, 1927 1936, 2426, 2612, 2647, 4087, 5635, 5692, and 6235", The Minor Planet Bulletin, 32 (3): 48–51, Bibcode:2005MPBu...32...48P. 
  4. ^ DeMeo, Francesca E.; et al. (2011), "An extension of the Bus asteroid taxonomy into the near-infrared" (PDF), Icarus, 202 (1): 160–180, Bibcode:2009Icar..202..160D, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2009.02.005, retrieved 2013-03-22.  See appendix A.
  5. ^ "Numbered Minor Planets 1–5000", Discovery Circumstances, IAU Minor Planet center, retrieved 2013-04-07. 
  6. ^ McDonald, Sophia Levy (June 1948), "General perturbations and mean elements, with representations of 35 minor planets of the Hecuba group", Astronomical Journal, 53, p. 199, Bibcode:1948AJ.....53..199M, doi:10.1086/106097. 
  7. ^ Kristensen, L. K. (1984), "The diameter of (106) Dione", Astronomische Nachrichten, 305 (4), pp. 207–211, Bibcode:1984AN....305..207K, doi:10.1002/asna.2113050410. 
  8. ^ Ryan, Erin Lee; et al. (April 2012), "The Kilometer-Sized Main Belt Asteroid Population as Revealed by Spitzer", arXiv:1204.1116Freely accessible [astro-ph.EP]. 

External links[edit]