1077 Campanula

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1077 Campanula
Discovery [1]
Discovered by K. Reinmuth
Discovery site Heidelberg Obs.
Discovery date 6 October 1926
Designations
MPC designation (1077) Campanula
Named after
Campanula (bellflower)[2]
1926 TK · 1957 AJ
1972 CB
main-belt · (inner)
Erigone[3]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 90.56 yr (33,077 days)
Aphelion 2.8655 AU
Perihelion 1.9220 AU
2.3938 AU
Eccentricity 0.1971
3.70 yr (1,353 days)
218.36°
0° 15m 57.96s / day
Inclination 5.3941°
346.20°
13.591°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 7.55±1.72 km[4]
9±2 km[5]
9.40 km (calculated)[3]
9.709±0.278 km[6][7]
3.847±0.002 h[a]
3.850±0.001 h[8][9]
3.850486±0.000001 h[10]
3.85085±0.00005 h[5]
3.852±0.002 h[11]
0.20 (assumed)[3]
0.225±0.017[6]
0.2253±0.0169[7]
0.33±0.12[4]
S[3]
V–R = 0.400±0.070[5]
12.3[1][7] · 12.50[3] · 12.50±0.02[5] · 12.53[4]

1077 Campanula, provisional designation 1926 TK, is a presumed Erigonian asteroid from the inner regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 9 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 6 October 1926, by German astronomer Karl Reinmuth at the Heidelberg Observatory in southwest Germany,[12] the asteroid was named after the bellflower Campanula.[2]

Classification and orbit[edit]

Campanula is considered to be a member of the Erigone family (406),[3] which is named after 163 Erigone, while other sources classify it as a background asteroid, not associated to any known asteroid family.[13][14]

It orbits the Sun in the inner main-belt at a distance of 1.9–2.9 AU once every 3 years and 8 months (1,353 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.20 and an inclination of 5° with respect to the ecliptic.[1] The body's observation arc begins at Heidelberg, 2 months after its official discovery observation.[12]

Physical characteristics[edit]

Campanula is an assumed stony S-type asteroid,[3] which is not in line with the darker C- and X-types seen among the Erigonian asteroids.[15]:23

Rotation period and poles[edit]

Several rotational lightcurves of Campanula were obtained from photometric observations. Lightcurve analysis gave a rotation period of 3.847 to 3.852 hours with a brightness variation of 0.24 to 0.40 magnitude (U=3-/3/3/3).[5][8][9][11][a]

A 2016-published lightcurve, using modeled photometric data from the Lowell Photometric Database (LPD), gave a concurring period of 3.850486 hours (U=n.a.), as well as two spin axis of (178.0°, 76.0°) and (313.0°, 59.0°) in ecliptic coordinates (λ, β).[10]

Diameter and albedo[edit]

According to observations taken at the Balzaretto Observatory (A81) and the survey carried out by the NEOWISE mission of NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, Campanula measures between 7.55 and 9.709 kilometers in diameter and its surface has an albedo between 0.225 and 0.33.[4][5][6][7]

The Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link assumes a standard albedo for stony asteroids of 0.20 and calculates a diameter of 9.40 kilometers based on an absolute magnitude of 12.50.[3]

Naming[edit]

This minor planet was named for the bellflower Campanula, the official naming citation was mentioned in The Names of the Minor Planets by Paul Herget in 1955 (H 102).[2]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Higgins (2011) web: rotation period hours with a brightness amplitude of mag. Summary figures for (1077) Campanula at Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link (CALL)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1077 Campanula (1926 TK)" (2017-04-28 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 30 August 2017. 
  2. ^ a b c Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1077) Campanula. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 92. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 30 August 2017. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h "LCDB Data for (1077) Campanula". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 30 August 2017. 
  4. ^ a b c d Nugent, C. R.; Mainzer, A.; Bauer, J.; Cutri, R. M.; Kramer, E. A.; Grav, T.; et al. (September 2016). "NEOWISE Reactivation Mission Year Two: Asteroid Diameters and Albedos". The Astronomical Journal. 152 (3): 12. arXiv:1606.08923Freely accessible. Bibcode:2016AJ....152...63N. doi:10.3847/0004-6256/152/3/63. Retrieved 30 August 2017. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f Franco, Lorenzo (April 2012). "Lightcurve Photometry and H-G Parameters for 1077 Campanula". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 39 (2): 67–69. Bibcode:2012MPBu...39...67F. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 30 August 2017. 
  6. ^ a b c Masiero, Joseph R.; Mainzer, A. K.; Grav, T.; Bauer, J. M.; Cutri, R. M.; Dailey, J.; et al. (November 2011). "Main Belt Asteroids with WISE/NEOWISE. I. Preliminary Albedos and Diameters". The Astrophysical Journal. 741 (2): 20. arXiv:1109.4096Freely accessible. Bibcode:2011ApJ...741...68M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/741/2/68. Retrieved 30 August 2017. 
  7. ^ a b c d Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Hand, E.; Bauer, J.; Tholen, D.; et al. (November 2011). "NEOWISE Studies of Spectrophotometrically Classified Asteroids: Preliminary Results" (PDF). The Astrophysical Journal. 741 (2): 25. arXiv:1109.6407Freely accessible. Bibcode:2011ApJ...741...90M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/741/2/90. Retrieved 30 August 2017. 
  8. ^ a b Aymami, Josep Maria (January 2012). "CCD Photometry and Lightcurve Analysis of Main Belt Asteroids 1077 Campanula and 1151 Ithaka from Observatori Carmelita". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 39 (1): 29. Bibcode:2012MPBu...39...29A. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 30 August 2017. 
  9. ^ a b Klinglesmith, Daniel A., III; Hendrickx, Sebastian; Madden, Karl; Montgomery, Samuel (July 2016). "Asteroid Lightcurves from Estcorn Observatory". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 43 (3): 234–239. Bibcode:2016MPBu...43..234K. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 30 August 2017. 
  10. ^ a b Durech, J.; Hanus, J.; Oszkiewicz, D.; Vanco, R. (March 2016). "Asteroid models from the Lowell photometric database". Astronomy and Astrophysics. 587: 6. arXiv:1601.02909Freely accessible. Bibcode:2016A&A...587A..48D. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201527573. Retrieved 30 August 2017. 
  11. ^ a b Stephens, Robert D. (January 2012). "Asteroids Observed from GMARS and Santana Observatories: 2011 July - September". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 39 (1): 11–12. Bibcode:2012MPBu...39...11S. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 30 August 2017. 
  12. ^ a b "1077 Campanula (1926 TK)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 30 August 2017. 
  13. ^ "AstDyS-2 data for (1077) Campanula". AstDyS – Asteroids Dynamic Site. Retrieved 30 August 2017. 
  14. ^ "Small Bodies Data Ferret". Nesvorny HCM Asteroid Families V3.0. Retrieved 30 August 2017. 
  15. ^ Nesvorný, D.; Broz, M.; Carruba, V. (December 2014). "Identification and Dynamical Properties of Asteroid Families" (PDF). Asteroids IV: 297–321. arXiv:1502.01628Freely accessible. Bibcode:2015aste.book..297N. doi:10.2458/azu_uapress_9780816532131-ch016. Retrieved 30 August 2017. 

External links[edit]