10979 Fristephenson

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10979 Fristephenson
Discovery
Discovered by van Houten, van Houten-Groeneveld & Gehrels
Discovery date 29 September 1973
Designations
MPC designation (10979) Fristephenson
4171 T-2; 4386 T-3
Sulamitis family 1
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 15422 days (42.22 yr)
Aphelion 2.65889 AU (397.764 Gm)
Perihelion 2.25686 AU (337.621 Gm)
2.45788 AU (367.694 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.081784
3.85 yr (1407.5 d)
18.97 km/s
88.0891°
0° 15m 20.804s / day
Inclination 5.56160°
138.326°
122.372°
Earth MOID 1.24578 AU (186.366 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 2.38722 AU (357.123 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.481
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 4? km
Mass 6.7×1013 kg
Mean density
2? g/cm³
Equatorial surface gravity
0.0011 m/s²
Equatorial escape velocity
0.0021 km/s
? d
0.10?
Temperature ~178 K
?
15.1

10979 Fristephenson is a small main belt asteroid named for F. Richard Stephenson, a British astronomer with important contributions to the History of astronomy and Earth's rotation at the University of Durham.

It was discovered on September 29, 1973, by Cornelis Johannes van Houten and Ingrid van Houten-Groeneveld at Leiden University, analysing photographs made by Tom Gehrels with the 48" Schmidt telescope at Palomar Observatory.[1]

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