10th century in Denmark

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10th century in Denmark
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9th century | 10th century | 11th century

The 10th century in Denmark saw the emergence of the country into the historical records and the conversion of the country to Christianity, the 950s are when the first records of the state of Denmark (Tan-marker) appeared.[1]

Monarchs[edit]

Events[edit]

  • 911
  • 940
  • 942
    • William I, Duke of Normandy offers asylum to Harald, and restores him to his throne by force. William I is assassinated later that year,[4] but possibly the "Haigrold" described by the chronicler was King Harald Greycloak of Norway or some other Viking.[5]
  • 947
    • The Norwegian Eric Bloodaxe is elected King of York. He is deposed when the English king Eadred marches north, and flees to Denmark.[6]
  • 949
    • Eric Bloodaxe returns from Denmark to England. He will be killed in battle in 952.[6]
  • 950
    • Gorm the Old conquers most of Denmark.[7]
    • (c.) Erik the Red is born.[8]
    • Denmark under Gorm's son Harald Bluetooth conquers Norway.[9]
  • 958
    • Gorm the Old dies.[10]
    • Harald Bluetooth becomes sole king, succeeding his father.[11]
  • 960
  • 965
  • 970
  • 974
  • 975
    • Harald Bluetooth tries to force Christianity upon Haakon Sigurdsson, who then turns against him.
  • 980s
  • 980
    • Struggling to unite Denmark, Harald Buetooth builds at least four large circular forts around this time.[15]
    • Harald Bluetooth builds the first church in Zealand at Roskilde.[16]
  • 983
  • 984
    • The ladies of Denmark give their gold and silver ornaments to the Jutlanders in exchange for the release of Sweyn Forkbeard.[17]
  • 987
  • 988
    • First known mention of Odense in writing.[18]
    • Sweyn seizes power from his father, Harald Bluetooth.[19]

References[edit]

Notes

Citations

  1. ^ Robbers 2006, p. 250.
  2. ^ Thomas, Alastair H. (2010-05-10). The A to Z of Denmark. Scarecrow Press. p. 208. ISBN 978-0-8108-7205-9. Retrieved 2012-10-29. 
  3. ^ Fodor's (2006-02-07). Fodor's Denmark, 5th Edition. Random House Digital, Inc. p. 230. ISBN 978-1-4000-1613-6. Retrieved 2012-10-29. 
  4. ^ Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge (Great Britain) (1839). Penny cyclopaedia of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge. C. Knight. p. 280. Retrieved 2012-10-29. 
  5. ^ Kendrick, T. D. (2004-04-30). A History of the Vikings. Courier Dover Publications. p. 225. ISBN 978-0-486-43396-7. Retrieved 2012-10-29. 
  6. ^ a b Arnold-Baker (2001-03-27). Companion to British History. Taylor & Francis. p. 14. ISBN 978-0-415-18583-7. Retrieved 2012-10-29. 
  7. ^ Sale, Richard (February 2007). Copenhagen and Denmark. New Holland Publishers. p. 13. ISBN 978-1-84537-634-5. Retrieved 2012-10-28. 
  8. ^ Waldman, Carl; Mason, Catherine (2006). Encyclopedia of European Peoples. Infobase Publishing. p. 918. ISBN 978-1-4381-2918-1. Retrieved 2012-10-28. 
  9. ^ Miller, George (1820). Lectures on the philosophy of modern history: delivered in the University of Dublin. Printed by Graisberry and Campbell for J. Murray. p. 239. Retrieved 2012-10-28. 
  10. ^ Holman, Katherine (2009-06-30). The A to Z of the Vikings. Scarecrow Press. p. 105. ISBN 978-0-8108-6813-7. Retrieved 2012-10-28. 
  11. ^ Eur (2002-12-13). Western Europe 2003. Psychology Press. p. 115. ISBN 978-1-85743-152-0. Retrieved 2012-10-28. 
  12. ^ "The Jelling Stones". National Museum of Denmark. Retrieved 2012-10-28. 
  13. ^ "al-Tartushi on Hedeby". Anders Winroth. Retrieved 2012-10-29. 
  14. ^ Hooper 1996, p. 35.
  15. ^ Gravett 2001, p. 128.
  16. ^ DK Publishing 2010, p. 140.
  17. ^ a b Anderson 1732, p. 418.
  18. ^ "Odenses historie" (in Danish). Odense Kommune. Retrieved 2012-10-01. 
  19. ^ Richardson 2005, p. 28.

Sources