11:11 (Come album)

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11:11
11 11 (Come album).jpg
Studio album by Come
Released 1992
Recorded July 1992
Genre Alternative rock
Blues
Length 52:30
Label Matador Records
Placebo Records
Sub Pop
Producer Come
Tim O'Heir
Carl Plaster
Come chronology
11:11
(1992)
Don't Ask, Don't Tell
(1994)
Singles from 11:11
  1. "Fast Piss Blues"
    Released: 20 November 1992
Professional ratings
Review scores
SourceRating
Allmusic3.5/5 stars[1]
Billboard MagazinePositive[2]
Robert ChristgauC+[3]
The Encyclopedia of Popular Music4/5 stars link
Entertainment WeeklyA−[4]
Musichound4/5 stars[5]
SPINPositive[6]
Mojo4/5 stars[7]
Paste magazinePositive[8]
Consequence of Sound3.5/5 stars[9]

11:11 is the debut album by Boston indie rock band Come.

Background[edit]

After their 12" single "Car" was released as part of Sub Pop's Single of the Month Club, "Come started getting raves in the press, [and] played to wildly enthusiastic crowds in London and Amsterdam"[10] before recording their debut album 11:11, which was recorded and mixed in just seven-and-a-half days.[10] Recorded in July 1992 at Fort Apache Studios in Cambridge, MA, 11:11 was produced by Come with Tim O'Heir and Carl Plaster. The album takes its title from the numerological phenomenon involving the recurrence and potential synchronicity of the time 11:11. The members of the band "decided on the title after glancing at a digital clock on several occasions and finding it was 11:11 each time."[11] As Brokaw puts it, "[i]t was a recurring phenomena [...] It became a sort of superstitious mantra."[11]

The band recorded a music video for the album's opening track, "Submerge", directed by Jesse Peretz, in addition to which their song "Dead Molly"[12] was included in Allison Anders and Kurt Voss's 1999 independent comedy Sugar Town.

The song "Fast Piss Blues" was released as a single, featuring a cover of Mick Jagger and Keith Richards's "I Got the Blues", from The Rolling Stones' 1971 album Sticky Fingers, as its B-side. Both songs were included in the CD version of 11:11, but did not feature in the LP version.

Critical reception[edit]

In a contemporary review for The Village Voice, music critic Robert Christgau said that the music comprises flat melodies with some slide guitar and lyrics that range from "unintelligible to incomprehensible".[3] Entertainment Weekly described 11:11 as "a captivating blast of ennui and feedback that may be Matador's finest moment yet", going on to characterize it as "enthralling, like watching someone howl into a rainstorm,"[13] whilst The Virgin Encyclopedia of Nineties Music states that it was "rightly lauded as one of 1992's finest releases."[14] Allmusic referred to 11:11 as "a uniquely sludgy, electric, and strong fusion of sounds and styles, combining extreme angst and commanding power."[15] Trouser Press stated that 11:11 is "very much a guitar tour de force, drenched as it is in the sweaty fluids that come forth when the six-strings of Zedek (a veteran of Boston's Dangerous Birds and New York's Live Skull) and Chris Brokaw (who served concurrently as Codeine's drummer until 1993) rub against each other."[16] Rolling Stone magazine called 11:11 "one of Matador's defining records,"[17] whilst the Rough Guide to Rock summarizes 11:11 as follows: "The music and moods teeter precariously, erupting into violent explosions with little warning."[18]

Re-issue[edit]

In January 2013, Matador Records announced that a special 20th anniversary 2 LP/CD re-issue of 11:11 would be released as in May 2013. The re-issue includes the original release, in addition to a live album consisting of the band's performance at the 1992 Vermonstress Festival.[19] Announcing the news, Pitchfork described 11:11 as "one of the more elusive gems of Matador's back catalog."[20]

The vinyl LP version of the record was pressed by United Record Pressing in Nashville, TN.

Cover versions[edit]

No Safety covered 11:11's opening track, "Submerge" in their 1994 album Live at the Knitting Factory, whilst Australian alternative rock band Screamfeeder covered "Off To One Side" in their 1999 album Home Age, a cover which was later included in their 2011 rarities compilation Cargo Embargo (B Sides & More).

Track listing[edit]

No.TitleWriter(s)Length
1."Submerge"Come4:24
2."Dead Molly"Come4:08
3."Brand New Vein"Come6:13
4."Off to One Side"Come5:47
5."Bell"Come3:25
6."William"Come4:34
7."Sad Eyes"Come4:03
8."Power Failure"Come5:44
9."Orbit"Come5.04
CD Bonus Tracks
No.TitleWriter(s)Length
10."Fast Piss Blues" (Bonus track on CD version)Come3:57
11."I Got the Blues" (Bonus track on CD version – The Rolling Stones cover)Jagger/Richards5:04
Anniversary Edition Reissue - Live at Vermonstress Festival, Burlington, VT
No.TitleWriter(s)Length
1."Dead Molly"Come 
2."William"Come 
3."Submerge"Come 
4."Last Mistake"Come 
5."Fast Piss Blues"Come 
6."Bell"Come 
7."Car"Come 
8."SVK"Come 

Personnel[edit]

with

  • Carl Plaster – piano on "Brand New Vein", organ on "Sad Eyes", floor tom on "Power Failure"
  • Bob Hamilton – art direction
  • Roderigo Avila – cover art

References[edit]

  1. ^ Allmusic review
  2. ^ Billboard Magazine review
  3. ^ a b Christgau, Robert (November 23, 1993). "Turkey Shoot". The Village Voice. New York. Retrieved July 5, 2013. 
  4. ^ Entertainment Weekly review
  5. ^ Musichound review
  6. ^ SPIN review
  7. ^ Stevie Chick (May 2013). "Come - Eleven:Eleven". Mojo. 
  8. ^ Robert Ham (June 4, 2013). "Come: 11:11 20th Anniversary Reissue". Paste magazine. Retrieved 2013-06-07. 
  9. ^ Sam Willett (May 23, 2013). "Album Review: Come – 11:11 [Deluxe Edition]". Consequence of Sound. Retrieved 2013-06-07. 
  10. ^ a b Option magazine, 1993. 
  11. ^ a b "George-Warren, Holly, "Come: The Next Chapter in Thalia Zedek's Indie Saga", Option magazine, No. 48". January–February 1993. Retrieved 2013-03-27. 
  12. ^ "IMDB, "Soundtracks for Sugar Town (1999)"". Retrieved 2013-03-27. 
  13. ^ "Entertainment Weekly, Browne, David, "Review of Eleven: Eleven", February 19, 1993". 1993-02-19. 
  14. ^ The Virgin Encyclopedia of Nineties Music. 2000. p. 94. 
  15. ^ "Allmusic, "Review of Come's Eleven: Eleven"". 
  16. ^ "Trouser Press". 
  17. ^ Rob Sheffield. "Matador's 'Lost Weekend,' Day Two". Rolling Stone. 
  18. ^ The Rough Guide to Rock, Edited by Peter Buckley (Rough Guides, 2003), p. 221. 
  19. ^ "Deluxe Reissue of 11:11 announcement". Retrieved 2013-03-24. 
  20. ^ "Matador to Reissue Come's Eleven : Eleven". Retrieved 2013-03-24.