1103 Sequoia

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1103 Sequoia
Discovery[2]
Discovered by W. Baade
Discovery date 9 November 1928
Designations
MPC designation (1103) Sequoia
Named after
Sequoia National Park
 
Main belt
Orbital characteristics[1][2]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 31841 days (87.18 yr)
Aphelion 2.11652 AU (316.627 Gm)
Perihelion 1.75103 AU (261.950 Gm)
1.93378 AU (289.289 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.094502
2.69 yr (982.22 d)
21.37 km/s
207.029°
0.366518°/day
Inclination 17.8972°
267.660°
77.8704°
Earth MOID 0.811037 AU (121.3294 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 3.1576 AU (472.37 Gm)
Physical characteristics
Dimensions ? km
Mass ?×10? kg
Mean density
? g/cm³
Equatorial surface gravity
? m/s²
Equatorial escape velocity
? km/s
3.03784 h (0.126577 d)
? d
?
?
0.10
Temperature ~200 K
E
12.25

1103 Sequoia is a 47 km minor planet. It is a member of the Hungaria family.[3] It was discovered by W. Baade on November 9, 1928, at the Hamburg Observatory in Bergedorf, Hamburg, Germany.[citation needed] It was named after Sequoia National Park where the discoverer spent his vacations.[4] It is a member of the Hungaria family of asteroids.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1103 Sequoia (1928 VB)". Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 26 March 2016. 
  2. ^ [1]
  3. ^ Spratt, Christopher E. (April 1990). "The Hungraria group of minor planets". Journal of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada. 84 (2): 123–131. Bibcode:1990JRASC..84..123S. ISSN 0035-872X. 
  4. ^ Schmadel, Lutz (1992). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names, Volym 1. Berlin: Springer Verlag. ISBN 3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 2014-01-09. 

External links[edit]