111 Ate

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111 Ate
Discovery
Discovered by Christian Heinrich Friedrich Peters
Discovery date 14 August 1870
Designations
MPC designation (111) Ate
1935 AA, A911 KE
Main belt
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 145.66 yr (53202 d)
Aphelion 2.8614 AU (428.06 Gm)
Perihelion 2.32553 AU (347.894 Gm)
2.59349 AU (387.981 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.10332
4.18 yr (1525.5 d)
18.44 km/s
190.607°
0° 14m 9.532s / day
Inclination 4.9318°
305.757°
166.424°
Earth MOID 1.34088 AU (200.593 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 2.23131 AU (333.799 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.406
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 134.55±4.6 km[1]
142.85 ± 5.94 km[2]
Mass (1.76 ± 0.44) × 1018 kg[2]
Mean density
1.15 ± 0.32 g/cm3[2]
Equatorial surface gravity
0.0376 m/s²
Equatorial escape velocity
0.0712 km/s
22.072 h (0.9197 d)[1]
22.072 ± 0.001 h[3]
0.0605±0.004
Temperature ~173 K
C[4]
8.02

111 Ate is a main-belt asteroid that was discovered by the German-American astronomer C. H. F. Peters on August 14, 1870,[5] and named after Ate, the goddess of mischief and destruction in Greek mythology. In the Tholen classification system, it is categorized as a carbonaceous C-type asteroid, while the Bus asteroid taxonomy system lists it as an Ch asteroid.[4]

Two stellar occultations by Ate were observed in 2000, only two months apart. The occultation of the star HIP 2559 by 111 Ate was used to determine a chord length of 125.6 ± 7.2 km through the asteroid, giving a lower bound on the maximum dimension.[6] During 2000, 111 Ate was observed by radar from the Arecibo Observatory, the return signal matched an effective diameter of 135 ± 15 km.[7] The estimated size of this asteroid is 143[2] km, making it one of the larger asteroids.

Based upon an irregular light curve that was generated from photometric observations of this asteroid at Pulkovo Observatory, it has a rotation period of 22.072 ± 0.001 hours and varies in brightness by 0.12 ± 0.01 in magnitude.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Yeomans, Donald K., "111 Ate", JPL Small-Body Database Browser, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, retrieved 12 May 2016. 
  2. ^ a b c d Carry, B. (December 2012), "Density of asteroids", Planetary and Space Science, 73, pp. 98–118, arXiv:1203.4336Freely accessible, Bibcode:2012P&SS...73...98C, doi:10.1016/j.pss.2012.03.009.  See Table 1.
  3. ^ a b Pilcher, Frederick (October 2011), "Rotation Period Determinations for 11 Parthenope, 38 Leda, 111 Ate 194 Prokne, 217 Eudora, and 224 Oceana", The Minor Planet Bulletin, 38 (4), pp. 183–185, Bibcode:2011MPBu...38..183P. 
  4. ^ a b DeMeo, Francesca E.; et al. (July 2009), "An extension of the Bus asteroid taxonomy into the near-infrared" (PDF), Icarus, 202 (1), pp. 160–180, Bibcode:2009Icar..202..160D, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2009.02.005, archived from the original (PDF) on 2014-03-17, retrieved 2013-04-08.  See appendix A.
  5. ^ "Numbered Minor Planets 1–5000", Discovery Circumstances, IAU Minor Planet center, retrieved 2013-04-07. 
  6. ^ Devyatkin, A. V.; et al. (November 2008), "Photometric observations of solar system bodies with ZA-320M automatic mirror astrograph in Pulkovo observatory", Planetary and Space Science, 56 (14), pp. 1888–1892, Bibcode:2008P&SS...56.1888D, doi:10.1016/j.pss.2008.02.014.  See Table 1.
  7. ^ Magri, Christopher; et al. (January 2007), "A radar survey of main-belt asteroids: Arecibo observations of 55 objects during 1999–2003", Icarus, 186 (1): 126–151, Bibcode:2007Icar..186..126M, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2006.08.018 

External links[edit]