1149

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1149 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar1149
MCXLIX
Ab urbe condita1902
Armenian calendar598
ԹՎ ՇՂԸ
Assyrian calendar5899
Balinese saka calendar1070–1071
Bengali calendar556
Berber calendar2099
English Regnal year14 Ste. 1 – 15 Ste. 1
Buddhist calendar1693
Burmese calendar511
Byzantine calendar6657–6658
Chinese calendar戊辰(Earth Dragon)
3845 or 3785
    — to —
己巳年 (Earth Snake)
3846 or 3786
Coptic calendar865–866
Discordian calendar2315
Ethiopian calendar1141–1142
Hebrew calendar4909–4910
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat1205–1206
 - Shaka Samvat1070–1071
 - Kali Yuga4249–4250
Holocene calendar11149
Igbo calendar149–150
Iranian calendar527–528
Islamic calendar543–544
Japanese calendarKyūan 5
(久安5年)
Javanese calendar1055–1056
Julian calendar1149
MCXLIX
Korean calendar3482
Minguo calendar763 before ROC
民前763年
Nanakshahi calendar−319
Seleucid era1460/1461 AG
Thai solar calendar1691–1692
Tibetan calendar阳土龙年
(male Earth-Dragon)
1275 or 894 or 122
    — to —
阴土蛇年
(female Earth-Snake)
1276 or 895 or 123

Year 1149 (MCXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Events[edit]

By area[edit]

Asia[edit]

Europe[edit]

By topic[edit]

Markets[edit]

  • Genoa grants the benefits of a part of the city's fiscal revenues to a consortium of creditor called compera, the first example of the consolidation of public debt in medieval Europe.[2]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ McGrank, Lawrence (1981). "Norman crusaders and the Catalan reconquest: Robert Burdet and te principality of Tarragona 1129-55". Journal of Medieval History. 7 (1): 67–82. doi:10.1016/0304-4181(81)90036-1. 
  2. ^ Munro, John H. (2003). "The Medieval Origins of the Financial Revolution". The International History Review. 25 (3): 506–562. doi:10.1080/07075332.2003.9641005.