SUMMARY / RELATED TOPICS

Yuichiro Ueno

Yuichiro Ueno is a Japanese long-distance runner, who specializes in the 1500 and 5000 metres events. Ueno began his international career at the IAAF World Cross Country Championships where he ran in the junior race in 2004 in the senior short race for the two years following that, he represented Japan in the International Chiba Ekiden in 2007, starting off the race with the second fastest leg, behind Moses Ndiema Masai. Japan went on to win the competition, he won in the 1500 m and 5000 m at the 2009 Japan Championships in Athletics, beating his teammate Kensuke Takezawa in the latter race. He finished sixteenth in his heat in the 5000 m at the 2009 World Championships in Athletics, he won bronze medals in the 1500 m and 5000 m at the East Asian Games that year. Ueno competed for Nagano in the 2011 Inter-Prefectural Men's Ekiden and ran in the final 13 km leg, improving the prefecture to second place in the final rankings behind Tochigi; that year he ran the opening leg of the International Chiba Ekiden and the Japanese team went on to finish as runner-up behind Kenya.

He is managed by Toshihiko Seko of S&B Foods. 1500 metres - 3:40.83 min 3000 metres - 7:57.70 min 5000 metres - 13:21.49 min 10,000 metres - 28:27.39 min

1926 Fijian general election

General elections were held in Fiji in 1926. The Legislative Council consisted of 12 official members, seven elected Europeans and two appointed Fijians; the Governor served as President of the Council. The Europeans were elected from six constituencies. Voting was restricted to men aged 21 or over, born to European parents who were British subjects and had been continuously resident in Fiji for 12 months, owning at least £20 of freehold or leasehold property or having an annual income of at least £120, were not on the public payroll. Badri Maharaj was nominated as the member representing Indo-Fijians. Joni Mataitini and Deve Toganivalu were appointed as the Fijian members, despite Toganivalu having finished third behind Epeli Ganilau in the voting by the Great Council of Chiefs