1164

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1164 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar1164
MCLXIV
Ab urbe condita1917
Armenian calendar613
ԹՎ ՈԺԳ
Assyrian calendar5914
Balinese saka calendar1085–1086
Bengali calendar571
Berber calendar2114
English Regnal year10 Hen. 2 – 11 Hen. 2
Buddhist calendar1708
Burmese calendar526
Byzantine calendar6672–6673
Chinese calendar癸未(Water Goat)
3860 or 3800
    — to —
甲申年 (Wood Monkey)
3861 or 3801
Coptic calendar880–881
Discordian calendar2330
Ethiopian calendar1156–1157
Hebrew calendar4924–4925
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat1220–1221
 - Shaka Samvat1085–1086
 - Kali Yuga4264–4265
Holocene calendar11164
Igbo calendar164–165
Iranian calendar542–543
Islamic calendar559–560
Japanese calendarChōkan 2
(長寛2年)
Javanese calendar1070–1072
Julian calendar1164
MCLXIV
Korean calendar3497
Minguo calendar748 before ROC
民前748年
Nanakshahi calendar−304
Seleucid era1475/1476 AG
Thai solar calendar1706–1707
Tibetan calendar阴水羊年
(female Water-Goat)
1290 or 909 or 137
    — to —
阳木猴年
(male Wood-Monkey)
1291 or 910 or 138

Year 1164 (MCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Events[edit]

By place[edit]

Africa[edit]

  • A commercial treaty grants access to Almohad-dominated ports to merchants from several European powers, including Marseille and Savona.[1]

Europe[edit]

By topic[edit]

Markets[edit]

  • The Republic of Venice imitates the Genoese example, and secures its loans against fiscal revenues, to obtain lower interest rates. In the first operation of this kind, the Republic obtains 1150 silver marci, for 12 years of the taxes levied on the Rialto market.[3]

Religion[edit]


Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Picard, Christophe (1997). La mer et les musulmans d'Occident VIIIe-XIIIe siècle. Paris: Presses Universitaires de France. 
  2. ^ a b Williams, Hywel (2005). Cassell's Chronology of World History. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson. pp. 125–126. ISBN 0-304-35730-8. 
  3. ^ Munro, John H. (2003). "The Medieval Origins of the Financial Revolution". The International History Review. 15 (3): 506–562. 
  4. ^ The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church-Momticelli; S. Miranda