11 Ursae Minoris

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11 Ursae Minoris
Observation data
Epoch J2000.0      Equinox J2000.0
Constellation Ursa Minor
Right ascension 15h 17m 05.89s[1]
Declination +71° 49′ 26.0″[1]
Apparent magnitude (V) 5.024
Characteristics
Spectral type K4 III[2]
Apparent magnitude (B) 6.415
Apparent magnitude (J) 2.876
Apparent magnitude (H) 2.091
Apparent magnitude (K) 1.939
B−V color index 1.391
Astrometry
Radial velocity (Rv)–17.87 km/s
Proper motion (μ) RA: 3.97±0.23[1] mas/yr
Dec.: 9.65±0.21[1] mas/yr
Parallax (π)8.19 ± 0.19[1] mas
Distance398 ± 9 ly
(122 ± 3 pc)
Absolute magnitude (MV)–0.37[3]
Details
Mass2.04±0.20[2] M
Radius28.20+0.71
−0.73
[2] R
Luminosity258.8±17.7[2] L
Surface gravity (log g)1.60[3] cgs
Temperature4358±59[2] K
Metallicity0.04 ± 0.04[3]
Age1.21±0.33[2] Gyr
Other designations
BD+72°678, GCRV 8864, HD 136726, HIP 74793, HR 5714, PPM 8870, SAO 8207
Database references
SIMBADdata
Exoplanet Archivedata
Extrasolar Planets
Encyclopaedia
data

11 Ursae Minoris (11 UMi) is the Flamsteed designation of a 5th magnitude K-type giant star located approximately 398 light years away[1] in the constellation Ursa Minor. This star is twice as massive, 28 times bigger, and 258 times more luminous than the Sun.[2]

11 Ursae minoris is sometimes named Pherkard or Pherkad Minor, the later name to distinguish it from Pherkad (Major) which is γ Ursae minoris. It has also been designated as γ1 Ursae minoris, in which case the brighter Pherkad is called γ2 Ursae minoris, but these names are rarely used.[4]

11 Ursae minoris has a detected planet discovered in August 2009.[3]

Planetary system[edit]

11 Ursae minoris b was discovered during a radial velocity survey of 62 K type Red giant stars using the 2m Alfred Jensch telescope of the Thuringian State Observatory in Germany.[3]

The 11 Ursae Minoris planetary system[3]
Companion
(in order from star)
Mass Semimajor axis
(AU)
Orbital period
(days)
Eccentricity Inclination Radius
b ≥10.50 ± 2.47 MJ 1.54 ± 0.07 516.22 ± 3.25 0.08 ± 0.03

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f van Leeuwen, F. (2007). "Validation of the new Hipparcos reduction". Astronomy and Astrophysics. 474 (2): 653–664. arXiv:0708.1752Freely accessible. Bibcode:2007A&A...474..653V. doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20078357.  Vizier catalog entry
  2. ^ a b c d e f g Baines, Ellyn K.; et al. (2018). "Fundamental Parameters of 87 Stars from the Navy Precision Optical Interferometer". The Astronomical Journal. 155. 30. arXiv:1712.08109Freely accessible. Bibcode:2018AJ....155...30B. doi:10.3847/1538-3881/aa9d8b. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f Döllinger, P.; et al. (2009). "Planetary companions around the K giant stars 11 Ursae Minoris and HD 32518". Astronomy and Astrophysics. 505 (3): 1311–1317. arXiv:0908.1753Freely accessible. Bibcode:2009A&A...505.1311D. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/200911702. 
  4. ^ Kostjuk, N. D. (2004). "VizieR Online Data Catalog: HD-DM-GC-HR-HIP-Bayer-Flamsteed Cross Index (Kostjuk, 2002)". VizieR On-line Data Catalog: IV/27A. Originally published in: Institute of Astronomy of Russian Academy of Sciences (2002). 4027. Bibcode:2004yCat.4027....0K. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: Sky map 15h 17m 05.8886s, +71° 49′ 26.044″