1224

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1224 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar1224
MCCXXIV
Ab urbe condita1977
Armenian calendar673
ԹՎ ՈՀԳ
Assyrian calendar5974
Balinese saka calendar1145–1146
Bengali calendar631
Berber calendar2174
English Regnal yearHen. 3 – 9 Hen. 3
Buddhist calendar1768
Burmese calendar586
Byzantine calendar6732–6733
Chinese calendar癸未(Water Goat)
3920 or 3860
    — to —
甲申年 (Wood Monkey)
3921 or 3861
Coptic calendar940–941
Discordian calendar2390
Ethiopian calendar1216–1217
Hebrew calendar4984–4985
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat1280–1281
 - Shaka Samvat1145–1146
 - Kali Yuga4324–4325
Holocene calendar11224
Igbo calendar224–225
Iranian calendar602–603
Islamic calendar620–621
Japanese calendarJōō 3 / Gennin 1
(元仁元年)
Javanese calendar1132–1133
Julian calendar1224
MCCXXIV
Korean calendar3557
Minguo calendar688 before ROC
民前688年
Nanakshahi calendar−244
Thai solar calendar1766–1767
Tibetan calendar阴水羊年
(female Water-Goat)
1350 or 969 or 197
    — to —
阳木猴年
(male Wood-Monkey)
1351 or 970 or 198

Year 1224 (MCCXXIV) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Events[edit]

By area[edit]

Americas[edit]

Europe[edit]

By topic[edit]

Education[edit]

  • The University of Naples is founded.

Religion[edit]

  • September 14 (approximate date) – St. Francis of Assisi, while praying on the mountain of Verna during a 40-day fast, has a vision, as a result of which he receives the stigmata. Brother Leo, who is with Francis at the time, leaves a clear and simple account of the event, the first definite account of the phenomenon of stigmata.[2]


Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Linehan, Peter (1999). "Chapter 21: Castile, Portugal and Navarre". In Abulafia, David. The New Cambridge Medieval History c.1198-c.1300. Cambridge University Press. pp. 668–699 [672]. ISBN 0-521-36289-X. 
  2. ^ Robinson, Paschal (1909). "St. Francis of Assisi". The Catholic Encyclopedia. VI. New York: Robert Appleton Company. Retrieved 2008-01-21.