1231

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1231 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar1231
MCCXXXI
Ab urbe condita1984
Armenian calendar680
ԹՎ ՈՁ
Assyrian calendar5981
Balinese saka calendar1152–1153
Bengali calendar638
Berber calendar2181
English Regnal year15 Hen. 3 – 16 Hen. 3
Buddhist calendar1775
Burmese calendar593
Byzantine calendar6739–6740
Chinese calendar庚寅(Metal Tiger)
3927 or 3867
    — to —
辛卯年 (Metal Rabbit)
3928 or 3868
Coptic calendar947–948
Discordian calendar2397
Ethiopian calendar1223–1224
Hebrew calendar4991–4992
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat1287–1288
 - Shaka Samvat1152–1153
 - Kali Yuga4331–4332
Holocene calendar11231
Igbo calendar231–232
Iranian calendar609–610
Islamic calendar628–629
Japanese calendarKangi 3
(寛喜3年)
Javanese calendar1140–1141
Julian calendar1231
MCCXXXI
Korean calendar3564
Minguo calendar681 before ROC
民前681年
Nanakshahi calendar−237
Thai solar calendar1773–1774
Tibetan calendar阳金虎年
(male Iron-Tiger)
1357 or 976 or 204
    — to —
阴金兔年
(female Iron-Rabbit)
1358 or 977 or 205

Year 1231 (MCCXXXI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Llywelyn the Great, who in 1231 launched a campaign against Normans in Wales.

Events[edit]

By area[edit]

Asia[edit]

  • April 9 – After a bizarre weather phenomena of yellowish clouds and dust chokes the air around Hangzhou, Song Dynasty, China, obscuring the sky and sun, a fire breaks out at night in the southeast of the city, which continues into the next day. Fighting the flames is difficult due to limited visibility; when the fires are extinguished, it is discovered that an entire district of some 10,000 houses in the southeast of the city were consumed by the flames.
  • Mongol troops cross the Yalu River into Korea, then under the Goryeo Kingdom.

Europe[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]


Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Rashdall, Hastings (1895). The Universities of Europe in the Middle Ages. Clarendon Press. p. 85. Retrieved November 20, 2016.
  2. ^ Peter Linehan (1999). "Chapter 21: Castile, Portugal and Navarre". In David Abulafia (ed.). The New Cambridge Medieval History c.1198-c.1300. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 668–673. ISBN 0-521-36289-X.