123 Democratic Alliance

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123 Democratic Alliance
一二三民主聯盟
Founder Yum Sin-ling
Founded 1994
Dissolved 3 December 2000 (2000-12-03)
Ideology Liberalism
San Min Doctrine
Regional affiliation Pro-Taiwan camp
Pro-democracy camp

123 Democratic Alliance (Chinese: 一二三民主聯盟) was a pro-Kuomintang political party in Hong Kong. Established in 1994 by a group of pro-Taiwan, pro-democracy and pro-business politicians,[1] it aims at striving for the unification of China, to strive for a free, democratic, and wealthy China, and to establish a democratic and prosperous Hong Kong. It remained a small party until it was dissolved in 2000 due to the lack of financial support from the Taiwan government.[2]

History[edit]

The party was formed by the supporters of the Kuomintang government on Taiwan in 1994, it was represented by Sin Ling Yum in the Legislative Council of Hong Kong (LegCo) from 1995 to 1997. It was excluded from the Provisional Legislative Council, the interim body which largely controlled by the Beijing government. All candidates were defeated in the 1998 LegCo elections.

The party won six seats in the 1999 District Council elections. Due to lack of funding, the party did not file any candidates in the 2000 LegCo elections (although some of the losers continued to take part as independent participants or supporters of other parties), and was subsequently dissolved on 3 December 2000 due to the lack of financial support from the Taiwan government,[2] the last chairman of the alliance was Tai Cheuk-yin.

Election performance[edit]

Legislative Council elections[edit]

Election Number of
popular votes
% of
popular votes
GC
seats
FC
seats
EC
seats
Total seats +/−
1995 0 0 1
1 / 60
N/A
1998 3,050Steady 0.21Steady 0 0 0
0 / 60
N/A

Municipal elections[edit]

Election Number of
popular votes
% of
popular votes
UrbCo
seats
RegCo
seats
Total
elected seats
1995 7,916Steady 1.42Steady 0 0
0 / 59

District Council elections[edit]

Election Number of
popular votes
% of
popular votes
Total
elected seats
+/−
1994 15,527Steady 2.26Steady
6 / 346
0Steady
1999 11,396Decrease 1.41Decrease
6 / 390
0Steady

References[edit]

  1. ^ The American Asian Review. Institute of Asian Studies, St. John's University. 1997. p. 239. 
  2. ^ a b Chan, Ming K.; So, Alvin Y. (2002). Crisis and Transformation in China's Hong Kong. M.E. Sharpe. p. 142.