1258

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1258 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar1258
MCCLVIII
Ab urbe condita2011
Armenian calendar707
ԹՎ ՉԷ
Assyrian calendar6008
Balinese saka calendar1179–1180
Bengali calendar665
Berber calendar2208
English Regnal year42 Hen. 3 – 43 Hen. 3
Buddhist calendar1802
Burmese calendar620
Byzantine calendar6766–6767
Chinese calendar丁巳(Fire Snake)
3954 or 3894
    — to —
戊午年 (Earth Horse)
3955 or 3895
Coptic calendar974–975
Discordian calendar2424
Ethiopian calendar1250–1251
Hebrew calendar5018–5019
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat1314–1315
 - Shaka Samvat1179–1180
 - Kali Yuga4358–4359
Holocene calendar11258
Igbo calendar258–259
Iranian calendar636–637
Islamic calendar655–656
Japanese calendarShōka 2
(正嘉2年)
Javanese calendar1167–1168
Julian calendar1258
MCCLVIII
Korean calendar3591
Minguo calendar654 before ROC
民前654年
Nanakshahi calendar−210
Thai solar calendar1800–1801
Tibetan calendar阴火蛇年
(female Fire-Snake)
1384 or 1003 or 231
    — to —
阳土马年
(male Earth-Horse)
1385 or 1004 or 232
Hulagu's army attacks Baghdad.

Year 1258 (MCCLVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Events[edit]

By area[edit]

Global[edit]

  • The observed effects of an eruption of the Indonesian volcano Mount Rinjani, in late 1257, include the following anecdotal accounts: dry fog in France; lunar eclipses in England; severe winter in Europe; a "harsh" spring in northern Iceland; famine in England, western Germany, France, and northern Italy; and pestilence in London, parts of France, Austria, Iraq, Syria, and southeast Turkey.[1]

Asia[edit]

Europe[edit]

By topic[edit]

Markets[edit]

  • In Genoa, the Republic starts imposing forced loans, known as luoghi, to its taxpayers; they are a common resource of medieval public finance.[2]

Religion[edit]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Stothers, R.B. (2000) "Climatic and Demographic consequences of the Massive Volcanic Eruption of 1258". Climatic Change, 45, 361–374.
  2. ^ Munro, John H. (2003). "The Medieval Origins of the Financial Revolution". The International History Review. 15 (3): 506–562.