1264

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1264 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar1264
MCCLXIV
Ab urbe condita2017
Armenian calendar713
ԹՎ ՉԺԳ
Assyrian calendar6014
Balinese saka calendar1185–1186
Bengali calendar671
Berber calendar2214
English Regnal year48 Hen. 3 – 49 Hen. 3
Buddhist calendar1808
Burmese calendar626
Byzantine calendar6772–6773
Chinese calendar癸亥(Water Pig)
3960 or 3900
    — to —
甲子年 (Wood Rat)
3961 or 3901
Coptic calendar980–981
Discordian calendar2430
Ethiopian calendar1256–1257
Hebrew calendar5024–5025
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat1320–1321
 - Shaka Samvat1185–1186
 - Kali Yuga4364–4365
Holocene calendar11264
Igbo calendar264–265
Iranian calendar642–643
Islamic calendar662–663
Japanese calendarKōchō 4 / Bun'ei 1
(文永元年)
Javanese calendar1174–1175
Julian calendar1264
MCCLXIV
Korean calendar3597
Minguo calendar648 before ROC
民前648年
Nanakshahi calendar−204
Thai solar calendar1806–1807
Tibetan calendar阴水猪年
(female Water-Pig)
1390 or 1009 or 237
    — to —
阳木鼠年
(male Wood-Rat)
1391 or 1010 or 238
A contemporary monument to the Battle of Lewes, a crucial 1264 battle in the Second Barons' War in England.

Year 1264 (MCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Events[edit]

By area[edit]

Asia[edit]

  • The Toluid Civil War ends: Kublai Khan defeats his brother and pretender to the title of Khagan, or Khan of Khans, Ariq Boke, who surrenders to Kublai and is summarily imprisoned. He dies a year later under mysterious circumstances, possibly by poisoning, but the cause of death is still uncertain. However, this battle essentially marks the end of a unified Mongol Empire.
  • Kublai Khan decides to move his capital, from Shangdu in Inner Mongolia, to the Chinese city of Dadu (now Beijing).
  • Kublai Khan publicly reprimands his own officers, for executing 2 Song Dynasty Chinese generals without trial or investigation. This act is one of many in order to enhance his reputation amongst the Chinese, to increase his legitimacy as a just ruler, and win over more defectors from the Southern Song.
  • The Japanese era Kōchō ends, and the Bun'ei era begins.

Europe[edit]

By topic[edit]

Education[edit]

Religion[edit]


Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Colombani, Philippe (2010). Héros corses du Moyen Age. Ajaccio: Albiana. p. 173. ISBN 978-2-84698-338-9.