1270 Datura

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1270 Datura
1270Datura (Lightcurve Inversion).png
A three-dimensional model of 1270 Datura based on its light curve.
Discovery [1]
Discovered by G. van Biesbroeck
Discovery site Yerkes Obs.
Discovery date 17 December 1930
Designations
MPC designation (1270) Datura
Named after
Datura stramonium[2]
(flowering plant)
1930 YE · 1953 XF1
A913 VB
main-belt[1][3] · (inner)
Datura[4]
Orbital characteristics[3]
Epoch 23 March 2018 (JD 2458200.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 87.43 yr (31,934 d)
Aphelion 2.7003 AU
Perihelion 1.7681 AU
2.2342 AU
Eccentricity 0.2086
3.34 yr (1,220 d)
122.36°
0° 17m 42.36s / day
Inclination 5.9859°
97.802°
258.98°
Earth MOID 0.7744 AU (301.689 LD)
Physical characteristics
Mean diameter
8.203±0.152 km[5]
3.359 h[6]
0.288±0.055[5]
S-type asteroid (assumed)[6]
12.5[1][3]

1270 Datura (1930 YE) is a S-type main-belt asteroid and namesake of the Datura family, discovered on 17 December 1930, by George Van Biesbroeck at Yerkes Observatory.[1] This asteroid is believed to result from the collisional destruction of a larger parent body approximately 530000±20000 years ago.[7][8]

Orbit and classification[edit]

Datura is the principal body of the small Datura family located in the Florian region.[4][9] It orbits the Sun in the inner main-belt at a distance of 1.8–2.7 AU once every 3 years and 4 months (1,220 days; semi-major axis of 2.23 AU). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.21 and an inclination of 6° with respect to the ecliptic.[3]

Naming[edit]

This minor planet was named after the Datura plant genus.[2] The official naming citation was mentioned in The Names of the Minor Planets by Paul Herget in 1955 (H 116).[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "1270 Datura (1930 YE)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 31 July 2018. 
  2. ^ a b c Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1270) Datura. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 105. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 31 July 2018. 
  3. ^ a b c d "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1270 Datura (1930 YE)" (2018-05-23 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 31 July 2018. 
  4. ^ a b "Asteroid 1270 Datura". Small Bodies Data Ferret. Retrieved 31 July 2018. 
  5. ^ a b Masiero, Joseph R.; Mainzer, A. K.; Grav, T.; Bauer, J. M.; Cutri, R. M.; Nugent, C.; et al. (November 2012). "Preliminary Analysis of WISE/NEOWISE 3-Band Cryogenic and Post-cryogenic Observations of Main Belt Asteroids" (PDF). The Astrophysical Journal Letters. 759 (1): 5. arXiv:1209.5794Freely accessible. Bibcode:2012ApJ...759L...8M. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/759/1/L8. Retrieved 31 July 2018. 
  6. ^ a b "LCDB Data for (1270) Datura". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 31 July 2018. 
  7. ^ Nesvorny, D.; Vokrouhlicky, D.; Bottke, W. F. (June 2006). "The Breakup of a Main-Belt Asteroid 450 Thousand Years Ago" (PDF). Science. 312: 1490. Bibcode:2006Sci...312.1490N. doi:10.1126/science.1126175. Retrieved 31 July 2018. 
  8. ^ Vokrouhlický, D.; Durech, J.; Michalowski, T.; Krugly, Yu. N.; Gaftonyuk, N. M.; Kryszczynska, A.; et al. (November 2009). "Datura family: the 2009 update". Astronomy and Astrophysics. 507 (1): 495–504. Bibcode:2009A&A...507..495V. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/200912696. Retrieved 31 July 2018. 
  9. ^ Nesvorný, D.; Broz, M.; Carruba, V. (December 2014). "Identification and Dynamical Properties of Asteroid Families" (PDF). Asteroids IV: 297–321. arXiv:1502.01628Freely accessible. Bibcode:2015aste.book..297N. doi:10.2458/azu_uapress_9780816532131-ch016. Retrieved 31 July 2018. 

External links[edit]