12 Lyncis

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12 Lyn
Observation data
Epoch J2000      Equinox J2000
Constellation Lynx
Right ascension 06h 46m 14.13019s[1]
Declination +59° 26′ 30.0227″[1]
Apparent magnitude (V) 4.87[2] (5.44 / 6.00)[3]
Characteristics
Evolutionary stage A3V[2]
U−B color index +0.08[4]
B−V color index +0.08[4]
Astrometry
Radial velocity (Rv) -3.00 ± 4.2[5] km/s
Proper motion (μ) RA: -19.63[1] mas/yr
Dec.: -7.23[1] mas/yr
Parallax (π) 15.19 ± 0.78[1] mas
Distance 210 ± 10 ly
(66 ± 3 pc)
Orbit[3]
Period (P) 907.6 yr
Semi-major axis (a) 2.30″
Eccentricity (e) 0.3700
Inclination (i) 134.7°
Longitude of the node (Ω) 166.5°
Periastron epoch (T) B 2677.4
Argument of periastron (ω)
(secondary)
322.6°
Other designations
12 Lyn, BD+59°1015 A, HD 48250, HIP 32438, HR 2470, SAO 25939, WDS 06462+5927A
Database references
SIMBAD 12 Lyn
12 Lyn A
12 Lyn B

12 Lyncis (12 Lyn) is a star in the constellation Lynx. Its combined apparent magnitude is 4.87. When seen through a telescope, it can be separated into three stars: two components with magnitudes 5.4 and 6.0 that lie at an angular separation by 1.8 (as of 1992) and a yellow-hued star of magnitude 7.2 at a separation of 8.6″ (as of 1990).[6][7] The orbit of the two brighter stars is not known with certainty, but appears to have a period of somewhere around 700 to 900 years.[8] Parallax indicates the system is 210 ± 10 light years distant from Earth.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f van Leeuwen, F.; et al. (2007). "Validation of the new Hipparcos reduction". Astronomy and Astrophysics. 474 (2): 653–664. arXiv:0708.1752Freely accessible. Bibcode:2007A&A...474..653V. doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20078357. Archived from the original on 2016-04-02. 
  2. ^ a b "* 12 Lyn". SIMBAD. Centre de données astronomiques de Strasbourg. Retrieved 20 November 2012. 
  3. ^ a b "Sixth Catalog of Orbits of Visual Binary Stars". United States Naval Observatory. Retrieved 28 May 2017. 
  4. ^ a b Johnson, H. L. (1966). "UBVRIJKL Photometry of the Bright Stars". Communications of the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory. 4. Bibcode:1966CoLPL...4...99J. 
  5. ^ Gontcharov, G. A. (2006). "Pulkovo Compilation of Radial Velocities for 35 495 Hipparcos stars in a common system". Astronomy Letters. 32 (11): 759–771. arXiv:1606.08053Freely accessible. Bibcode:2006AstL...32..759G. doi:10.1134/S1063773706110065. 
  6. ^ Mason, Brian D.; et al. (2001), "The 2001 US Naval Observatory Double Star CD-ROM. I. The Washington Double Star Catalog", The Astronomical Journal, 122 (6): 3466, Bibcode:2001AJ....122.3466M, doi:10.1086/323920. 
  7. ^ Monks, Neale (2010). Go-To Telescopes Under Suburban Skies. New York, New York: Springer Science & Business Media. p. 56. ISBN 9781441968517. 
  8. ^ Malkov, O. Yu.; Tamazian, V.S.; Docobo, J.A.; Chulkov, D.A. (2012). "Dynamical Masses of a Selected Sample of Orbital Binaries". Astronomy and Astrophysics. 546: 5. Bibcode:2012A&A...546A..69M. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201219774. A69.