12th century in Wales

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11th century | 13th century | Other years in Wales
Other events of the century

This article is about the particular significance of the century 1101 - 1200 to Wales and its people.

Events[edit]

1102

1103

  • Iorwerth ap Bleddyn, prince of Powys, having been insufficiently rewarded for his actions the previous year, again rebels against Henry I[1] and is arraigned before a royal tribunal at Shrewsbury, convicted and imprisoned, leaving his brother Cadwgan ap Bleddyn as sole ruler of the parts of Powys not already in Norman hands.[4]

1109

1110

1111

1112

  • William de Braose regains possession of the estates lost two years earlier.

1113

1114

1115

1116

  • Revolt against the Normans.

1119

1120

1121

1123

1124

1125

  • Bernard, Bishop of St David’s, ejects the Benedictines from Carmarthen, replacing them with the Augustinian order.
  • David, Bishop of Bangor, visits the Archbishop of Canterbury at Lambeth.

1127

1128

  • Bishop Urban of Llandaff seeks support from the Pope for the extension of his diocese.

1129

1130

1131

  • 9 May - Tintern Abbey is founded.
  • Bernard, Bishop of St David’s, is present at a second council of Reims. His cathedral at St David’s receives a “dedication”, possibly indicating a partial rebuilding.

1132

1133

1135

1136

1137

1138

1139

1140

1141

1143

1144

  • Bernard, Bishop of St David’s, gives land at Trefgarn to the first Cistercian monks to settle in west Wales.
  • Cadwaladr ap Gruffydd ap Cynan brings a Danish fleet to Abermenai from his Irish allies; the Danes are driven out by his brother Owain Gwynedd. Cadwaladr is reconciled with Owain and restored to Ceredigion.
  • Hugh de Mortimer recaptures Maelienydd and Elfael from the Welsh.

1145

1146

1147

1148

1149

1150

1151

  • Cadell ap Gruffydd is attacked by Normans while hunting in the forest of Coed Rhath. Although he survives the attack, he is unable to continue his military activities.

1152

1153

1154

1155

1157

  • King Henry II of England invades Wales, with the support of Madog ap Maredudd, attacking Anglesey by sea. Despite an ambush in Hawarden Woods (led by Owain’s sons Dafydd and Cynan) near Ewloe in north-east Wales, Owain Gwynedd loses the upper hand. A subsequent peace agreement between Henry and Owain forces the latter to cede Tegeingl to England; it is not recovered until the late 1160s. Owain is also made to return his brother Cadwaladr to his former position.

1158

1159

1160

1162

1163

1164

1165

1165

1167

1170

1171

1172

  • Philip de Braose is given the “honour” of Limerick, in recognition of his service to the English king in Ireland.
  • Gerald of Wales completes his studies at the University of Paris and returns to Britain. He is soon commissioned by the Archbishop of Canterbury to enforce the payment of tithes on wool and cheese in the diocese of St David’s. In the same year David Fitzgerald, the bishop, is granted a royal charter confirming all his possessions.
  • Following the death of his son Owain at the hands of the Earl of Gloucester, Iorwerth ab Owain rebels against Norman rule.

1173

  • Maelgwn ab Owain Gwynedd, one of the sons of Owain Gwynedd, is driven into exile in Ireland by his brother Dafydd. Dafydd sides with the King of England against the Welsh rebels and seeks the hand of Henry’s half-sister Emma of Anjou in return for his assistance.
  • Iorwerth ab Owain and his son take Caerleon and other castles in Gwent.

1174

1175

1176

1177

1179

1180

1183

  • Gerald of Wales visits Ireland, with his brother Philip.
  • A rising in Glamorgan is led by Morgan ap Caradog ap Iestyn.

1184

1185

1186

1187

1188

  • Gerald of Wales accompanies Baldwin, Archbishop of Canterbury, on a journey through Wales to recruit volunteers for the Third Crusade. The only Welsh ruler who refuses to support the visit is Owain Cyfeiliog, who is excommunicated for his failure to cooperate.

1189

1190

1192

1194

1195

1196

1199

1200

Books[edit]

Births[edit]

1132

1146

1173

Deaths[edit]

1101

1107

1111

1115

1116

1120

1129

1132

1134

1136

1137

1143

1148

1155

1160

1170

1172

1175

1176

1191

1195

1197

1200

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Palmer, Alan; Veronica (1992). The Chronology of British History. London: Century Ltd. pp. 58–60. ISBN 0-7126-5616-2. 
  2. ^ Crouch, David (2007). The Normans; The History of a Dynasty. London: Hambledon Continuum. p. 175. 
  3. ^ Moody, T. W.; et al., eds. (1989). A New History of Ireland. 8: A Chronology of Irish History. Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-821744-2. 
  4. ^ "Iorwerth ap Bleddyn". Welsh Biography Online. National Library of Wales. 2009. Retrieved 2013-02-15. 
  5. ^ Cawley 2012, "Miles of Gloucester" cites several primary sources including "XX", Collectanea Topographica et Genealogica, I, 1834, p. 168 .
  6. ^ "Giraldus Cambrensis". Welsh Biography Online. National Library of Wales. 2009. Retrieved 2013-02-15. 
  7. ^ Brut y Tywysogion pp. 136–137.
  8. ^ "A Christian presence since the 12th Century". St Mary's Church, Aberavon. Retrieved 12 May 2018. 
  9. ^ Brut y Tywysogion p. 138. "...there was a great pestilence throughout the island of Britain ... and that tempest killed innumerable people and many of the nobility and many princes, and spared none. That year, four days before May Day, died Rhys ap Gruffydd, Prince of Deheubarth and unconquered head of all Wales."