13154 Petermrva

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13154 Petermrva
Discovery [1]
Discovered by A. Galád
A. Pravda
Discovery site Modra Obs.
Discovery date 7 September 1995
Designations
MPC designation (13154) Petermrva
Named after
Peter Mrva
(Slovak amateur astronomer)[2]
1995 RC · 1972 TL6
main-belt · Flora[3]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 44.58 yr (16,282 days)
Aphelion 2.5790 AU
Perihelion 1.8401 AU
2.2095 AU
Eccentricity 0.1672
3.28 yr (1,200 days)
230.03°
0° 18m 0.36s / day
Inclination 5.5206°
331.59°
59.149°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 4.170±0.239 km[4][5]
4.176 km[6]
4.18 km (taken)[3]
2.9848±0.0002 h[a]
2.98502±0.00004 h[7]
0.1464[6]
0.152±0.020[4][5]
S[3]
14.1[1] · 14.11±0.03 (R)[a] · 14.46±0.32[8] · 14.56[4] · 14.6±0.058[6]

13154 Petermrva, provisional designation 1995 RC, is a stony Flora asteroid from the inner regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 4.2 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 7 September 1995, by Slovak astronomers Adrián Galád and Alexander Pravda at the Modra Observatory in the Bratislava Region of Slovakia,[9] the asteroid was named after Slovak amateur astronomer Peter Mrva.[2]

Orbit and classification[edit]

Petermrva is a member of the Flora family, one of the largest families of stony asteroids. It orbits the Sun in the inner main-belt at a distance of 1.8–2.6 AU once every 3 years and 3 months (1,200 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.17 and an inclination of 6° with respect to the ecliptic.[1] The first precovery was taken at Crimea-Nauchnij in 1972, extending the asteroid's observation arc by 23 years prior to its discovery.[9]

Physical characteristics[edit]

Two well-defined rotational lightcurves of Petermrva were obtained from photometric observations at the Modra and Ondřejov Observatory rendered a rotation period of 2.98502±0.00004 and 2.9848±0.0002 hours, with a brightness amplitude of 0.18 and 0.14 in magnitude, respectively (U=3/3).[7][a]

According to the thermal observation carried out by the NEOWISE mission of NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, Petermrva measures 4.2 kilometer and has an untypically low albedo of 0.15.[4]

Naming[edit]

This minor planet is named after Slovak amateur astronomer Peter Mrva (born 1962) who participated in the construction the discovering Modra Observatory, after which the minor planet 11118 Modra is named. He was also one of the first observers at the newly installed observatory, the second discoverer, Alexander Pravda, is thankful for his explanation and inspiration in some fields of astronomy and computer graphics.[2] The approved naming citation was published by the Minor Planet Center on 27 April 2002 (M.P.C. 45338).[10]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Pravec (2008) web: lightcurve plot-A and lighcurve plot-B of (13154) Petermrva rotation period 2.9848±0.0002 hours with a brightness amplitude of 0.14 mag. The Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link rates the observations with a quality code of 3 (U=3), which denotes a secure result within the precision given and no ambiguity. Summary figures at Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link (CALL) and Ondrejov Asteroid Photometry Project, Pravec, P.; Wolf, M.; Sarounova, L.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 13154 Petermrva (1995 RC)" (2017-05-05 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 5 July 2017. 
  2. ^ a b c Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (13154) Petermrva. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 793. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 24 January 2016. 
  3. ^ a b c "LCDB Data for (13154) Petermrva". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 17 May 2016. 
  4. ^ a b c d Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Hand, E.; Bauer, J.; Tholen, D.; et al. (November 2011). "NEOWISE Studies of Spectrophotometrically Classified Asteroids: Preliminary Results". The Astrophysical Journal. 741 (2): 25. arXiv:1109.6407Freely accessible. Bibcode:2011ApJ...741...90M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/741/2/90. Retrieved 17 May 2016. 
  5. ^ a b Masiero, Joseph R.; Mainzer, A. K.; Grav, T.; Bauer, J. M.; Cutri, R. M.; Dailey, J.; et al. (November 2011). "Main Belt Asteroids with WISE/NEOWISE. I. Preliminary Albedos and Diameters". The Astrophysical Journal. 741 (2): 20. arXiv:1109.4096Freely accessible. Bibcode:2011ApJ...741...68M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/741/2/68. Retrieved 3 December 2016. 
  6. ^ a b c Pravec, Petr; Harris, Alan W.; Kusnirák, Peter; Galád, Adrián; Hornoch, Kamil (September 2012). "Absolute magnitudes of asteroids and a revision of asteroid albedo estimates from WISE thermal observations". Icarus. 221 (1): 365–387. Bibcode:2012Icar..221..365P. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2012.07.026. Retrieved 17 May 2016. 
  7. ^ a b Galád, A. (April 2007). "Lightcurves and Synodic Periods for Asteroids 1998 ST49, (13154) and (27529)". Earth. 100 (1-2): 77–82. Bibcode:2007EM&P..100...77G. doi:10.1007/s11038-006-9099-1. Retrieved 17 May 2016. 
  8. ^ Veres, Peter; Jedicke, Robert; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Denneau, Larry; Granvik, Mikael; Bolin, Bryce; et al. (November 2015). "Absolute magnitudes and slope parameters for 250,000 asteroids observed by Pan-STARRS PS1 - Preliminary results". Icarus. 261: 34–47. arXiv:1506.00762Freely accessible. Bibcode:2015Icar..261...34V. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2015.08.007. Retrieved 17 May 2016. 
  9. ^ a b "13154 Petermrva (1995 RC)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 24 January 2016. 
  10. ^ "MPC/MPO/MPS Archive". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 17 May 2016. 

External links[edit]