1394 Algoa

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1394 Algoa
Discovery [1]
Discovered by C. Jackson
Discovery site Johannesburg Obs.
Discovery date 12 June 1936
Designations
MPC designation (1394) Algoa
Named after
Algoa Bay
(in South Africa)[2]
1936 LK · 1929 TT
1933 UY1
main-belt · (inner)[3]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 80.42 yr (29,372 days)
Aphelion 2.6253 AU
Perihelion 2.2531 AU
2.4392 AU
Eccentricity 0.0763
3.81 yr (1,391 days)
94.682°
0° 15m 31.32s / day
Inclination 2.6746°
178.83°
114.12°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 14.22 km (calculated)[3]
2.768±0.001 h[4][5]
0.20 (assumed)[3]
S[3]
11.11±0.22[6] · 11.6[1][3]

1394 Algoa, provisional designation 1936 LK, is a stony asteroid from the inner regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 14 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 12 June 1936, by English-born South-African astronomer Cyril Jackson at Union Observatory in Johannesburg, South Africa.[7] The asteroid was named after the historical Algoa Bay.[2]

Orbit and classification[edit]

Algoa orbits the Sun in the inner main-belt at a distance of 2.3–2.6 AU once every 3 years and 10 months (1,391 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.08 and an inclination of 3° with respect to the ecliptic.[1] Prior to its discovery observation in 1936, Algoa was identified as 1929 TT and 1933 UY1 at Lowell Observatory and Uccle Observatory, respectively. These observations, however, remained unused to extend the body's observation arc.[7]

Physical characteristics[edit]

In 2012, two rotational lightcurves of Algoa were obtained at the U.S. Etscorn Observatory, New Mexico, and at the Riverland Dingo Observatory, Australia. They gave a well-defined, concurring rotation period of 2.768 hours with a brightness variation of 0.20 and 0.21 magnitude, respectively (U=3-/3).[4][5] The Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link assumes a standard albedo for stony S-type asteroids of 0.20, and calculates a diameter of 14.2 kilometers with an absolute magnitude of 11.6.[3]

Naming[edit]

This minor planet was named after the historical Algoa Bay, located approximately 700 kilometers east of the Cape of Good Hope, South Africa.[2] The approved naming citation was published by the Minor Planet Center before November 1977 (M.P.C. 909).[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1394 Algoa (1936 LK)" (2016-11-11 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 25 July 2017. 
  2. ^ a b c Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1394) Algoa. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 113. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 13 December 2016. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f "LCDB Data for (1394) Algoa". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 13 December 2016. 
  4. ^ a b Klinglesmith, Daniel A., III; Risley, Ethan; Turk, Janek; Vargas, Angelica; Warren, Curtis (January 2013). "Lightcurves for 1394 Algoa, 3078 Horrocks, 4724 Brocken, and 6329 Hikonejyo from Etscorn Campus Observatory". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 40 (1): 16–17. Bibcode:2013MPBu...40...16K. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 13 December 2016. 
  5. ^ a b Hills, Kevin (October 2012). "Asteroid Lightcurve Analysis at Riverland Dingo Observatory: 1394 Algoa, 1660 Wood, 8882 Sakaetamura, and (15269) 1990 XF". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 39 (4): 239–240. Bibcode:2012MPBu...39..239H. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 13 December 2016. 
  6. ^ Veres, Peter; Jedicke, Robert; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Denneau, Larry; Granvik, Mikael; Bolin, Bryce; et al. (November 2015). "Absolute magnitudes and slope parameters for 250,000 asteroids observed by Pan-STARRS PS1 - Preliminary results". Icarus. 261: 34–47. arXiv:1506.00762Freely accessible. Bibcode:2015Icar..261...34V. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2015.08.007. Retrieved 13 December 2016. 
  7. ^ a b "1394 Algoa (1936 LK)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 13 December 2016. 
  8. ^ "MPC/MPO/MPS Archive". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 13 December 2016. 

External links[edit]