14:59

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14:59
SR-14-59.jpg
Studio album by Sugar Ray
Released January 12, 1999
Recorded 1998
Genre Alternative rock, pop rock
Length 40:30
Label Atlantic
Producer David Kahne, except for "Abracadabra" which was produced by Ralph Sall
Sugar Ray chronology
Floored
(1997)
14:59
(1999)
Sugar Ray
(2001)
Singles from 14:59
  1. "Every Morning"
    Released: January 2, 1999
  2. "Someday"
    Released: June 15, 1999
  3. "Falls Apart"
    Released: December 28, 1999

14:59 is the third studio album by American rock band Sugar Ray, released on January 12, 1999. It entered the top 20 on the Billboard 200, peaking at number 17[1] and certified triple-platinum by the RIAA. The album shows the band moving into a more mainstream pop rock sound, due to the success of their single "Fly" off their prior album, Floored, the album's title is a self-deprecating reference to the "15 minutes of fame" critics claimed the band was riding on.

Background[edit]

In 1997, Sugar Ray released their second album, Floored. Late in the recording sessions, the band recorded a much poppier track, the reggae song "Fly". The track became a surprise hit, the track's massive success inspired the band to further pursue the sound on their following album, 14:59.[2]

Sound[edit]

The album's sound has elements of alternative rock[3] and pop rock.[4] "Aim for Me" is a punk rock track in the vein of Green Day and "Falls Apart" and "Personal Space Invader" take influence from Synchronicity and Men Without Hats,[5] while "Burning Dog" has a skate punk sound similar to The Offspring and "Live & Direct" features vocals from KRS-One.[6] In addition, "Every Morning" (that has been called an acoustic pop number[5]), "Someday" and "Ode to the Lonely Hearted" are reminiscent of previous hit single "Fly".[6] The album also features two comedic songs titled "New Direction", the former being death metal and the latter a circus music instrumental.[5]

Promotion and release[edit]

The song "Glory" was used in the film American Pie, and featured on the soundtrack album,[7] the song "Aim For Me" was featured in the 2001 film Max Keeble's Big Move.

Reception[edit]

Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
AllMusic 4/5 stars[5]
Entertainment Weekly C+[6]
The Guardian 3/5 stars[8]
Los Angeles Times 3/4 stars[9]
NME 7/10[10]
Q 4/5 stars[11]
Rolling Stone 3.5/5 stars[12]
The Rolling Stone Album Guide 3.5/5 stars[13]
The Village Voice (choice cut)[14]

The album was generally well received by critics. Paul Pearson of AllMusic wrote, "Their third album showed an alarming overhaul in their approach...from their metal shellac toward a calmer, melodious pastiche of songs. and concluded that 14:59 has such catchiness and charm that it's a guilty pleasure of high order, and a bigger step than one might have expected from Sugar Ray."[5] NME's referred to the album as a "hellishly difficult record to hate...Not that this is especially inspired stuff, but, if you wanted a soundtrack for the kind of sun-kissed pool-party the sleeve depicts, 14:59 is maybe as good as you could get today."[10] Rolling Stone praised the album for its diversity and for not sticking too closely to the sound of "Fly" stating that the band instead "...go[es] off the deep end with gorgeous psychedelic guitar hooks and drum loops, and Mark McGrath's wise-guy futon talk... everything they play is shaped by the cut-and-paste aesthetic of the sampler."[12] Robert Christgau picked out the album's song, "Every Morning", as a choice cut.[14]

David Browne of Entertainment Weekly was less positive and stated: "It's genuinely hard to hate Sugar Ray; [...] Still, listening to '14:59' is a somewhat sad, depressing experience. [...] The album is the sound of a band resigned to the possibility that they may be one-hit wunderkinds and that the 2 million fans who bought their last album may have moved on to Barenaked Ladies."[6]

Track listing[edit]

All music composed by Sugar Ray except where noted.

No. Title Music Length
1. "New Direction"   0:48
2. "Every Morning"   3:39
3. "Falls Apart" Sugar Ray, David Kahne 4:15
4. "Personal Space Invader" Sugar Ray, David Kahne 3:38
5. "Live & Direct" (feat. KRS-One) Sugar Ray, David Kahne 4:34
6. "Someday" Sugar Ray, David Kahne 4:02
7. "Aim For Me"   2:20
8. "Ode To The Lonely Hearted" Nick Sopkovich, Sugar Ray, David Kahne 3:12
9. "Burning Dog"   3:01
10. "Even Though"   2:35
11. "Abracadabra" (Steve Miller Band cover) Steve Miller 3:42
12. "Glory"   3:26
13. "New Direction"   1:18
Total length: 40:37

Sugar Ray sold a different version of the 14:59 album to audiences that attended their live tour, this album included 5 tracks[15] not found on the retail version. These tracks are:

  • The hit "Fly" from their previous Floored album
  • The original demo recording of "Aim for Me"
  • A live acoustic version of "Every Morning"
  • The radio edit of "Falls Apart"
  • "Rivers", a song written in the style of and in tribute to Weezer frontman Rivers Cuomo

References[edit]

  1. ^ "14:59 chart performance". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Archived from the original on June 14, 2011. Retrieved 2011-06-14. 
  2. ^ "Interview with Mark McGrath of Sugar Ray". NY Rock. April 1999. Archived from the original on 2000-01-16. Retrieved 2012-02-08. 
  3. ^ Huey, Steve (2002). "Sugar Ray - Biography". AllMusic. Retrieved 2012-02-25. 
  4. ^ "14:59". NME. 1999-05-15. Retrieved 2011-06-14. 
  5. ^ a b c d e Pearson, Paul. "14:59 – Sugar Ray". AllMusic. Retrieved June 14, 2011. 
  6. ^ a b c d Browne, David (January 25, 1999). "14:59". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on June 7, 2011. Retrieved June 14, 2011. 
  7. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0163651/soundtrack
  8. ^ Sullivan, Caroline (May 28, 1999). "Sugar Ray: 14:59 (Atlantic)". The Guardian. 
  9. ^ Nichols, Natalie (January 11, 1999). "Time Isn't Quite Up Yet for Sugar Ray in New Album '14:59'". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved August 14, 2013. 
  10. ^ a b Chick, Stevie (June 15, 1999). "Sugar Ray – 14:59". NME. Archived from the original on August 17, 2000. Retrieved June 14, 2011. 
  11. ^ "Sugar Ray: 14:59". Q (153): 114. June 1999. 
  12. ^ a b Howling Wolf (January 12, 1999). "Sugar Ray: 14:59". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on November 16, 2007. Retrieved May 5, 2012. 
  13. ^ Harris, Keith (2004). "Sugar Ray". In Brackett, Nathan; Hoard, Christian. The New Rolling Stone Album Guide. Simon & Schuster. p. 791. ISBN 0-7432-0169-8. 
  14. ^ a b Christgau, Robert (October 26, 1999). "Consumer Guide: Easy Money". The Village Voice. Retrieved December 3, 2015. 
  15. ^ 14:59 [Tour Edition] at AllMusic. Retrieved 2012-02-08.