1450s

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
Categories:

The 1450s decade ran from January 1, 1450, to December 31, 1459.

Events[edit]

1450

January–December[edit]

Date unknown[edit]

1451[edit]

January–December[edit]

Date unknown[edit]

1452[edit]

January–December[edit]

Date unknown[edit]

1453[edit]

Sultan Mehmed II's entry into Constantinople, Fausto Zonaro (1854–1929)
Battle of Castillon

1454[edit]

January–December[edit]

Date unknown[edit]

1455[edit]

January–December[edit]

1456[edit]

January–December[edit]

Date unknown[edit]

1457[edit]

January–December[edit]

Date unknown[edit]

1458[edit]

January–December[edit]

Date unknown[edit]

1459[edit]

January–December[edit]

Date unknown[edit]

Significant people[edit]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Historic Sanctuary of Machu Picchu — UNESCO World Heritage Centre". UNESCO. 2006. Retrieved 9 December 2006. 
  2. ^ Klooster, John W. (2009). Icons of invention: the makers of the modern world from Gutenberg to Gates. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO. p. 8. ISBN 978-0-313-34745-0. 
  3. ^ "Historical Events in 1452". OnThisDay.com. Retrieved 2017-08-08. 
  4. ^ Setton, Kenneth M. (1978). The Papacy and the Levant (1204–1571), volume II: The Fifteenth Century. DIANE Publishing. p. 146. ISBN 0-87169-127-2. 
  5. ^ "What Happened In 1453". Hisdates. Retrieved 2017-08-08. 
  6. ^ Crowley, Roger (2006). Constantinople: The Last Great Siege, 1453. Faber. ISBN 0-571-22185-8.  (reviewed by Foster, Charles (September 22, 2006). "The Conquest of Constantinople and the end of empire". Contemporary Review. Archived from the original on March 27, 2007. It is the end of the Middle Ages ) (Archived Link)
  7. ^ "Letter of Rabbi Isaac Zarfati". Turkishjews.com. Retrieved 2016-07-09. 
  8. ^ Vasconcelos e Sousa, Bernardo. "História de Portugal" (in Portuguese) (4th ed.). p. 182. 
  9. ^ Martin Luther D'Ooge (1909), The Acropolis of Athens (The acropolis of Athens ed.), New York: Macmillan, In 1458 the Turkish ruler occupied the Propylaea as a residence, and turned the Erechtheum into a harem, restoring, however, the Parthenon to the Greeks as a place of worship. 
  10. ^ Lemaître, Frédéric (19 September 2011). "Erfurt, ses juifs et l'UNESCO". Le Monde (in French). Retrieved 19 September 2011. 
  11. ^ Connor, Steve (2014-07-07). "The history of the planet's biggest volcanic explosions - deep in the ice of Antarctica". The Independent. London. Retrieved 2014-07-07. 
  12. ^ The Oxford Illustrated History of Ireland. Foster, RF. Oxford University Press, Oxford. 1989