148 Gallia

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148 Gallia
Discovery [1]
Discovered by P. M. Henry
Discovery site Paris
Discovery date 7 August 1875
Designations
MPC designation (148) Gallia
Pronunciation /ˈɡæliə/
Named after
Gaul[2]
(Latin name for France)
main-belt[1][3] · (middle)
Gallia[4]
Orbital characteristics[3]
Epoch 23 March 2018 (JD 2458200.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 138.37 yr (50,540 d)
Aphelion 3.2885 AU
Perihelion 2.2531 AU
2.7708 AU
Eccentricity 0.1868
4.61 yr (1,685 d)
278.58°
0° 12m 49.32s / day
Inclination 25.291°
145.01°
252.79°
Physical characteristics
Mean diameter
80.87±1.04 km[5]
83.45±5.07 km[6]
85.91±23.39 km[7]
97.75±3.7 km[8]
98.09 km (derived)[9]
Mass (4.89±1.67)×1018 kg[6]
Mean density
16.06±6.22 g/cm3[6]
20.6592±0.0007 h[10]
20.66±0.01 h[10]
20.664 h[11]
20.665266 h[a]
20.666±0.002 h[12][b]
0.1640±0.013[8]
0.2013 (derived)[9]
0.21±0.12[7]
0.240±0.008[5]
Tholen = GU [3]
SMASS = S[3][9]
B–V = 0.858[3]
U–B = 0.423[3]
6.97±0.84[13]
7.4[9]
7.4±0.1[14][15]
7.63[3][5][8]
7.67[7]
7.72±0.10[16]

148 Gallia (as Greek Γαλλία) is an asteroid from the central regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 90 kilometers (56 miles) in diameter. It was discovered on 7 August 1875, by the French brothers Paul Henry and Prosper Henry at the Paris, but the credit for this discovery was given to Prosper,[1] it was named after the Latin name for the country of France, Gaul.[2] Based upon its spectrum, it is an unusual G-type asteroid (GU) and a stony S-type asteroid in the Tholen and SMASS classification, respectively.[3][17]

Photometric observations of this asteroid at the European Southern Observatory in 1977–78 gave a light curve with a period of 0.86098 ± 0.00030 days (20.6635 ± 0.0072 h) and a brightness variation of 0.32 in magnitude.[11] A 2007 study at the Palmer Divide Observatory in Colorado, United States, yielded a period of 20.666 ± 0.002 hours with a magnitude variation of 0.21.[12][b]

This object is the namesake of the Gallia family (802), a small family of nearly 200 known stony asteroids that share similar spectral properties and orbital elements.[18] Hence they may have arisen from the same collisional event. All members have a relatively high orbital inclination.[19]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Warner (2011) web: modeled lightcurve gave a rotation period 20.665266 hours. Summary figures for (148) Gallia at the LCDB
  2. ^ a b Lightcurve plot of 148 Gallia, Palmer Divide Observatory, B. D. Warner (2007): rotation period 20.666±0.002 hours with a brightness amplitude of 0.21±0.02 mag. Quality code of 2+. Summary figures at the LCDB

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "148 Gallia". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 18 April 2018. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (148) Gallia. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 29. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 18 April 2018. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 148 Gallia" (2017-10-28 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 18 April 2018. 
  4. ^ "Small Bodies Data Ferret". Nesvorny HCM Asteroid Families V3.0. Retrieved 18 April 2018. 
  5. ^ a b c Usui, Fumihiko; Kuroda, Daisuke; Müller, Thomas G.; Hasegawa, Sunao; Ishiguro, Masateru; Ootsubo, Takafumi; et al. (October 2011). "Asteroid Catalog Using Akari: AKARI/IRC Mid-Infrared Asteroid Survey". Publications of the Astronomical Society of Japan. 63 (5): 1117–1138. Bibcode:2011PASJ...63.1117U. doi:10.1093/pasj/63.5.1117. Retrieved 18 April 2018.  Online catalog
  6. ^ a b c Carry, B. (December 2012), "Density of asteroids" (PDF), Planetary and Space Science, 73, pp. 98–118, arXiv:1203.4336Freely accessible, Bibcode:2012P&SS...73...98C, doi:10.1016/j.pss.2012.03.009  See Table 1.
  7. ^ a b c Nugent, C. R.; Mainzer, A.; Bauer, J.; Cutri, R. M.; Kramer, E. A.; Grav, T.; et al. (September 2016). "NEOWISE Reactivation Mission Year Two: Asteroid Diameters and Albedos" (PDF). The Astronomical Journal. 152 (3): 12. arXiv:1606.08923Freely accessible. Bibcode:2016AJ....152...63N. doi:10.3847/0004-6256/152/3/63. Retrieved 18 April 2018. 
  8. ^ a b c Tedesco, E. F.; Noah, P. V.; Noah, M.; Price, S. D. (October 2004). "IRAS Minor Planet Survey V6.0". NASA Planetary Data System. Bibcode:2004PDSS...12.....T. Retrieved 18 April 2018. 
  9. ^ a b c d "LCDB Data for (148) Gallia". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 18 April 2018. 
  10. ^ a b Behrend, Raoul. "Asteroids and comets rotation curves – (148) Gallia". Geneva Observatory. Retrieved 18 April 2018. 
  11. ^ a b Surdej, A.; Surdej, J. (September 1979). "Photoelectric lightcurves and rotation period of the minor planet 148 Gallia". Astronomy and Astrophysics Supplement Series: 471–474. Bibcode:1979A&AS...37..471S. Retrieved 18 April 2018. 
  12. ^ a b Warner, Brian D. (December 2007). "Asteroid Lightcurve Analysis at the Palmer Divide Observatory - March-May 2007". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 34 (4): 104–107. Bibcode:2007MPBu...34..104W. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 18 April 2018. 
  13. ^ Veres, Peter; Jedicke, Robert; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Denneau, Larry; Granvik, Mikael; Bolin, Bryce; et al. (November 2015). "Absolute magnitudes and slope parameters for 250,000 asteroids observed by Pan-STARRS PS1 - Preliminary results" (PDF). Icarus. 261: 34–47. arXiv:1506.00762Freely accessible. Bibcode:2015Icar..261...34V. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2015.08.007. Retrieved 18 April 2018. 
  14. ^ Harris, A. W.; Young, J. W.; Dockweiler, Thor; Gibson, J.; Poutanen, M.; Bowell, E. (January 1992). "Asteroid lightcurve observations from 1981". Icarus: 115–147.ResearchsupportedbyLowellObservatoryEndowmentandNASA. Bibcode:1992Icar...95..115H. doi:10.1016/0019-1035(92)90195-D. ISSN 0019-1035. Retrieved 18 April 2018. 
  15. ^ Pravec, Petr; Harris, Alan W.; Kusnirák, Peter; Galád, Adrián; Hornoch, Kamil (September 2012). "Absolute magnitudes of asteroids and a revision of asteroid albedo estimates from WISE thermal observations". Icarus. 221 (1): 365–387. Bibcode:2012Icar..221..365P. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2012.07.026. Retrieved 18 April 2018. 
  16. ^ Warner, Brian D. (December 2007). "Initial Results of a Dedicated H-G Project". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 34 (4): 113–119. Bibcode:2007MPBu...34..113W. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 18 April 2018. 
  17. ^ Lazzaro, D.; Angeli, C. A.; Carvano, J. M.; Mothé-Diniz, T.; Duffard, R.; Florczak, M. (November 2004). "S 3OS 2: the visible spectroscopic survey of 820 asteroids". Icarus. 172 (1): 179–220. Bibcode:2004Icar..172..179L. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2004.06.006. Retrieved 18 April 2018. 
  18. ^ Nesvorný, D.; Broz, M.; Carruba, V. (December 2014). "Identification and Dynamical Properties of Asteroid Families" (PDF). Asteroids IV: 297–321. arXiv:1502.01628Freely accessible. Bibcode:2015aste.book..297N. doi:10.2458/azu_uapress_9780816532131-ch016. Retrieved 18 April 2018. 
  19. ^ Novakovic, Bojan; Cellino, Alberto; Knezevic, Zoran (November 2011). "Families among high-inclination asteroids" (PDF). Icarus. 216 (1): 69–81. arXiv:1108.3740Freely accessible. Bibcode:2011Icar..216...69N. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2011.08.016. Retrieved 18 April 2018. 

External links[edit]