SUMMARY / RELATED TOPICS

Louisiana Highway 86

Louisiana Highway 86 is a state highway located in southern Louisiana. It runs 16.42 miles in a general north–south direction from LA 182 in New Iberia to LA 31 north of town. LA 86 follows the east bank of Bayou Teche, it heads eastward from New Iberia, the parish seat north through the village of Loreauville, in a general southwestern direction to a point on the St. Martin Parish line. Outside of New Iberia, the route travels through a thin ribbon of residential development in otherwise rural surroundings. LA 86 crosses Bayou Teche twice by way of movable bridges near each terminus, it makes a long loop off of LA 31, which otherwise follows the west bank of the bayou from New Iberia northward toward St. Martinville. Signage for LA 86 does not carry directional banners. From the south, LA 86 begins at an intersection with LA 182 in New Iberia. LA 182 follows the one-way couplet of Main and St. Peter Streets through the city's Historic Commercial District. LA 86 proceeds northeast on Julia Street for one block through the couplet makes a zigzag onto Main Street for half a block.

The route turns northeast on Bridge Street and crosses a bascule bridge over Bayou Teche, which flows through the center of town. Now known as Duperier Avenue, LA 86 proceeds through a residential neighborhood and intersects LA 87 at Oak Street. LA 87 mirrors the route of LA 182 on the opposite bank of Bayou Teche toward Jeanerette. After several blocks, LA 86 turns eastward onto Loreauville Road and parallels the bayou to the east end of New Iberia. Just outside the city limits, LA 87 passes through an area known as Morbihan, where it intersects LA 344 and LA 3195. 2 miles LA 86 intersects LA 320, which heads southwest to Olivier between New Iberia and Jeanerette. LA 86 curves northward with Bayou Teche as the residential development thins out somewhat, giving way to more rural farmland. After crossing the Loreauville Canal, the highway passes through an area known as Vida. Soon afterward, it travels along Main Street. At the intersection of Main and Bridge Streets, LA 86 has a second junction with LA 344 at the opposite end of its route.

Soon afterward, LA 86 intersects LA 3242, which travels eastward to Dauterive Landing on the shore of Lake Dauterive. Leaving Loreauville, LA 86 curves around a northern bend in Bayou Teche and intersects two state highways located 2 miles apart: LA 345 and LA 680. Now heading southwest as Daspit Road, LA 86 curves away from the bayou, which snakes back toward the highway at Daspit. Here, LA 86 intersects LA 347. LA 86 crosses the bayou a second time, this time via swing bridge turns northwest onto Belmont Road along the bayou's opposite bank; the route terminates shortly afterward at a second junction with LA 31 located about 600 feet from the St. Martin Parish line between New Iberia and St. Martinville. LA 86 is an undivided two-lane highway for its entire length, it is classified as a rural major or minor collector by the Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development. However, the portions of the route running through New Iberia and Loreauville are classified as an urban minor arterial and an urban collector, respectively.

Daily traffic volume in 2013 averaged 10,900 vehicles over most of the route between New Iberia and Loreauville, peaking at 13,300 through the former. The lowest figure reported; the posted speed limit is 55 mph, reduced to 35 mph through St. Martinville and 30 mph through Loreauville; the entirety of LA 86 is part of the Bayou Teche Byway in the state-designated system of tourist routes known as the Louisiana Scenic Byways. In the original Louisiana Highway system in use between 1921 and 1955, the modern LA 86 was part of two separate routes; the section from the southern terminus to the present intersection with LA 3242 in Loreauville made up the majority of State Route 56. It was designated in 1921 by an act of the state legislature as one of the original 98 state highway routes. Route 56. Beginning at New Iberia, thence through Loreauville to Dautrive's Landing. While LA 86 continues from Loreauville around the northern bend in Bayou Teche, Route 56 turned east in Loreauville to follow the entirety of what is now LA 3242 to Lake Dauterive.

The route remained the same up to the 1955 Louisiana Highway renumbering. The remainder of the present route of LA 86 from Loreauville to the north side of New Iberia was designated as State Route 446 in the pre-1955 system. Route 446 was added to the state highway system in 1928 by an act of the state legislature. Route 446. Beginning at St. Martin Parish line in Iberia Parish on the east bank of Bayou Teche thence following Bayou Teche on its east bank to meet Route 56 at Loreauville; the only difference in the pre-1955 route is that instead of crossing Bayou Teche at Daspit, Route 446 turned northwest to follow what is now LA 347 for a short distance to the St. Martin Parish line; the short section of LA 86 connecting to LA 31 was not part of the state highway system at that time. Route 446 remained the same up to the 1955 renumbering. LA 86 was created in 1955 as a collective renumbering of former State Route 446 and the majority of State Route 56. La 86—From a junction with La-US 90 at or near New Iberia through or near Morbihan and Loreauville to a junction with La 31 near New Iberia.

The route description reflects the fact that the southern terminus in New Iberia was once a junction with US

South African type XM1 tender

The South African type XM1 tender was a steam locomotive tender. Type XM1 tenders were Type TM tenders which were reclassified after their intermediate draw and buffing gear were altered to an "X_" tender configuration, they first entered service in 1912, as tenders to the SAR Class MC 2-6-6-0 Denver type Mallet locomotive. Type TM tenders were built between 1912 by the North British Locomotive Company; the two Type XM1 tenders entered service on the South African Railways in 1912, as Type TM tenders to Class MC 2-6-6-0 Denver type Mallet locomotives. At some stage before 1941, the intermediate draw and buffing gear of two of the tenders, numbers 1607 and 1615, were altered to an "X_" tender configuration; these two tenders were reclassified to Type XM1. The tender had a coal capacity of 8 long tons 5 hundredweight and a water capacity of 4,000 imperial gallons, with a maximum axle load of 10 long tons 18 hundredweight. Since many tender types are interchangeable between different locomotive classes and types, a tender classification system was adopted by the SAR.

The first letter of the tender type indicates the classes of engines. The "X_" tenders could be used with the following locomotive classes: Cape Government Railways Mountain, SAR Class 4. SAR Class 4A. SAR Class 5. Cape Government Railways 6th Class of 1897, SAR Class 6B. Oranje-Vrijstaat Gouwerment-Spoorwegen 6th Class L3, SAR Class 6E. Cape Government Railways 6th Class of 1901, SAR Class 6H. Cape Government Railways 6th Class of 1902, SAR Class 6J. Cape Government Railways 8th Class of 1902, SAR Class 8. Imperial Military Railways 8th Class, SAR Class 8A. Central South African Railways Class 8-L2, SAR Class 8B. Central South African Railways Class 8-L3, SAR Class 8C. Cape Government Railways 8th Class 4-8-0 of 1903, SAR Class 8D. Cape Government Railways 8th Class Experimental, SAR Class 8E. Cape Government Railways 8th Class 4-8-0 of 1904, SAR Class 8F. Cape Government Railways 8th Class 2-8-0 of 1903, SAR Class 8Y. Cape Government Railways 8th Class 2-8-0 of 1904, SAR Class 8Z. Central South African Railways Class 9, SAR Class 9.

Central South African Railways Class 10, SAR Class 10. Central South African Railways Class 10-2 Saturated, SAR Class 10A. Central South African Railways Class 10-2 Superheated. SAR Class 10B. Central South African Railways Class 10-C, SAR Class 10C. Central South African Railways Class 11, SAR Class 11. Cape Government Railways 9th Class of 1903, SAR Class Experimental 4. Cape Government Railways 9th Class of 1906, SAR Class Experimental 5. Cape Government Railways 10th Class, SAR Class Experimental 6. SAR Class ME. Central South African Railways Mallet Superheated, SAR Class MF; the second letter indicates the tender's water capacity. The "_M" tenders had a capacity of 4,000 imperial gallons. A number, when added after the letter code, indicates differences between similar tender types such as function, wheelbase or coal bunker capacity