151 Abundantia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
151 Abundantia
Discovery[1]
Discovered by J. Palisa
Discovery site Austrian Naval Obs.
Discovery date 1 November 1875
Designations
MPC designation (151) Abundantia
Named after
Abundantia
Main belt
Orbital characteristics[2][3]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 131.24 yr (47936 d)
Aphelion 2.6792 AU (400.80 Gm)
Perihelion 2.5049 AU (374.73 Gm)
2.5921 AU (387.77 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.033623
4.17 yr (1524.3 d)
141.90°
0° 14m 10.212s / day
Inclination 6.4348°
38.872°
130.92°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 45.37±0.9 km
9.864 h (0.4110 d)
0.1728±0.007[3]
0.173[4]
S[5]
9.1

151 Abundantia is a stony main belt asteroid. It was discovered by Johann Palisa on 1 November 1875, from the Austrian Naval Observatory in Pula. The name was chosen by Edmund Weiss of the Vienna Observatory; although the name refers to Abundantia, a Roman goddess of luck, it was also chosen to celebrate the increasing numbers of asteroids that were being discovered in the 1870s.[6]

Information from A. Harris as of March 1, 2001 indicates that 151 Abundantia is an S class (stony) asteroid with a diameter of 45.37 km and H = 9.24 .1728 and albedo of 0.03. The light curve collected over 6 nights from 2/16/2002 to 3/10/2002 confirmed the rotational period to be 19.718h.

Data from 2001 shows a diameter of 45.37 km.[7] An occultation by the asteroid was observed on December 10, 2017, showing the asteroid to be highly elongated, with dimensions of roughly 24 x 52 km.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Harvard, Numbured MPs
  2. ^ "The Asteroid Orbital Elements Database". astorb. Lowell Observatory. 
  3. ^ a b "151 Abundantia". JPL Small-Body Database. NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 12 May 2016. 
  4. ^ DSN IRAS Archived 2005-02-24 at the Wayback Machine.
  5. ^ LCSUMPUB
  6. ^ Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names. Springer Science & Business Media. p. 29. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3. 
  7. ^ "151 Abundantia". Archived from the original on 2009-05-02. Retrieved 2009-03-11. 

External links[edit]