1569 Evita

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1569 Evita
Discovery [1]
Discovered by M. Itzigsohn
Discovery site La Plata Obs.
Discovery date 3 August 1948
Designations
MPC designation (1569) Evita
Named after
Eva Perón
(First Lady of Argentina)[2]
1948 PA · 1936 KE
1947 LA · 1976 SJ10
main-belt · (outer)
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 68.65 yr (25,075 days)
Aphelion 3.5669 AU
Perihelion 2.7267 AU
3.1468 AU
Eccentricity 0.1335
5.58 yr (2,039 days)
95.582°
0° 10m 35.76s / day
Inclination 12.267°
99.509°
249.74°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 36.346±0.208 km[3]
0.047±0.007[4]
11.2[1]

1569 Evita, provisional designation 1948 PA, is a dark background asteroid from the outer regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 36 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 3 August 1948, by astronomer Miguel Itzigsohn at the La Plata Astronomical Observatory in Argentina.[5] The asteroid was named after Eva Perón.[2]

Orbit and classification[edit]

Based on the Hierarchical Clustering Method, Evita is a background asteroid that does not belong to any known asteroid family.[6] It orbits the Sun in the outer main-belt at a distance of 2.7–3.6 AU once every 5 years and 7 months (2,039 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.13 and an inclination of 12° with respect to the ecliptic.[1]

The asteroid was first identified as 1936 KE at the Johannesburg Observatory in May 1936. The body's observation arc begins with its official discovery observation at La Plata.[5]

Physical characteristics[edit]

Diameter and albedo[edit]

According to the survey carried out by the NEOWISE mission of NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, Evita measures 36.346 kilometers in diameter and its surface has an albedo of 0.047.[3][4] An albedo near 0.05 is typical for carbonaceous C-type asteroids which dominate the outer asteroid belt. It has an absolute magnitude of 11.2.[1]

Rotation period[edit]

As of 2017, no rotational lightcurve of Evita has been obtained from photometric observations. The asteroid's rotation period and axis, as well as its shape remain unknown.[7]

Naming[edit]

This minor planet was named in after the First Lady of Argentina, Eva Perón (1919–1952), who was commonly known by the affectionate Spanish diminutive form of her name, Evita. She was the wife of President Juan Perón (1895–1974) of Argentina.[2]

The discoverer also named the asteroids 1581 Abanderada, 1582 Martir, 1588 Descamisada and 1589 Fanatica in tribute to Eva Perón.[2] The official naming citation was published by the Minor Planet Center before November 1979 (M.P.C. 519).[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1569 Evita (1948 PA)" (2017-03-29 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 12 September 2017. 
  2. ^ a b c d Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1569) Evita. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 124. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 12 September 2017. 
  3. ^ a b Masiero, Joseph R.; Grav, T.; Mainzer, A. K.; Nugent, C. R.; Bauer, J. M.; Stevenson, R.; et al. (August 2014). "Main-belt Asteroids with WISE/NEOWISE: Near-infrared Albedos". The Astrophysical Journal. 791 (2): 11. arXiv:1406.6645Freely accessible. Bibcode:2014ApJ...791..121M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/791/2/121. Retrieved 12 September 2017. 
  4. ^ a b Masiero, Joseph R.; Mainzer, A. K.; Grav, T.; Bauer, J. M.; Cutri, R. M.; Nugent, C.; et al. (November 2012). "Preliminary Analysis of WISE/NEOWISE 3-Band Cryogenic and Post-cryogenic Observations of Main Belt Asteroids". The Astrophysical Journal Letters. 759 (1): 5. arXiv:1209.5794Freely accessible. Bibcode:2012ApJ...759L...8M. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/759/1/L8. Retrieved 12 September 2017. 
  5. ^ a b "1569 Evita (1948 PA)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 12 September 2017. 
  6. ^ "Small Bodies Data Ferret". Nesvorny HCM Asteroid Families V3.0. Retrieved 12 September 2017. 
  7. ^ "LCDB Data for (1569) Evita". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 12 September 2017. 
  8. ^ "MPC/MPO/MPS Archive". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 12 September 2017. 

External links[edit]