15th Legislative District (New Jersey)

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New Jersey's 15th Legislative District
New Jersey Legislative Districts Map (2011) D15 hl.svg
Senator Shirley Turner (D)
Assembly members Verlina Reynolds-Jackson (D)
Anthony Verrelli (D)
Registration
Demographics
Population 204,558
Voting-age population 159,829
Registered voters 131,080

New Jersey's 15th Legislative District is one of 40 in the New Jersey Legislature, covering the Hunterdon County municipalities of East Amwell Township, Lambertville City and West Amwell Township; and the Mercer County municipalities of Ewing Township, Hopewell Borough, Hopewell Township, Lawrence Township, Pennington Borough, Trenton City and West Windsor Township.[1]

Demographic characteristics[edit]

As of the 2010 United States Census, the district had a population of 204,558, of whom 159,829 (78.1%) were of voting age. The racial makeup of the district was 108,921 (53.2%) White, 59,690 (29.2%) African American, 831 (0.4%) Native American, 12,838 (6.3%) Asian, 182 (0.1%) Pacific Islander, 15,716 (7.7%) from some other race, and 6,380 (3.1%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 36,924 (18.1%) of the population.[2] The district had 131,080 registered voters as of November 30, 2017, of whom 52,105 (39.8%) were registered as unaffiliated, 60,221 (45.9%) were registered as Democrats, 17,900 (13.7%) were registered as Republicans, and 854 (0.7%) were registered to other parties.[3]

The district includes New Jersey's capital, Trenton and a number of its comparatively wealthier suburbs to the north. The district has the smallest population of any district in the state, and has a comparatively higher percentage of African-American residents and a notable percentage of children in the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program. Registered Democrats outnumber Republicans by an almost 3 to 1 margin.[4][5]

Political representation[edit]

The district is represented for the 2018–2019 Legislative Session (Senate, General Assembly) in the State Senate by Shirley Turner (D, Lawrence Township) and in the General Assembly by Verlina Reynolds-Jackson (D, Trenton) and Anthony Verrelli (D, Hopewell Township).[6][7]

1967–1973[edit]

In the interim period after the 1964 Supreme Court decision Reynolds v. Sims which required the creation of state legislature districts to be made as equal in population as possible and the 1973 creation of the 40-district map, the 15th District was based in the rural northwestern counties of the state. In the 1967 and 1969 elections, the district consisted of all of Hunterdon, Warren, and Sussex counties which sent one Senator and two Assembly members to the Legislature, elected at-large.[8][9] For the 1971 election, the district was made up of only Warren and Sussex counties, again electing one Senator and two Assembly members.[10] Republican Wayne Dumont won both Senate elections for the 15th District in this period.[11][12] In the Assembly elections, Republican Robert Littell won one seat in each of the three Assembly elections in the 15th District. Incumbent Republican Assemblyman from Hunterdon County Douglas E. Gimson won re-election to the Assembly in 1967 from this district but died on May 15, 1969.[11][13] Republicans chose Walter E. Foran to be the other Republican candidate in 1969's general election resulting in a lawsuit from third-place finisher Walter C. Keogh-Dwyer. Foran was elected to the other seat in 1969 and served one term until his home county was moved to the 6th District in 1971.[9][10] Keogh-Dwyer sought election to the Assembly again in 1971 but was successful in this election.[12]

Election history since 1973[edit]

In the 40-district legislative map created in 1973, the 15th District consisted of all of Warren and Sussex counties and West Milford and Ringwood in Passaic County.[14] With the exception of the district electing one Democrat to the Assembly in the 1973 general election, the district had been solidly Republican until 1982. When redistricting following the 1980 United States Census shifted the district to the Trenton area, the 15th District became a strongly Democratic district. The new 15th District consisted of Trenton, Ewing, Lawrence Township, West Windsor, Princeton Township and Princeton Borough.[15] The 1981 elections brought in Democrats Gerald R. Stockman in the Senate, along with Gerard S. Naples and John S. Watson in the Assembly. The trio remained together in office for a decade.

No changes were made to the district boundaries following the 1990 Census and 1991 redistricting.[16] New Jersey Lottery television host Dick LaRossa ran as a Republican in 1991, having registered with the party only five days before that year's filing deadline. He defeated incumbent Gerald R. Stockman by a narrow 50.9%-49.1% margin.[17] His Republican running mate John W. Hartmann knocked off Naples, while Democrat Watson was narrowly re-elected to a sixth term in office. Hartmann, a 24-year-old student at the Seton Hall University School of Law, became the youngest Republican ever elected to the Assembly.[18]

In the 1993 elections, Democrats sought to recoup their losses suffered in the 1991 Republican landslide. In the Assembly, Shirley Turner and Joseph Yuhas ran for office, winning back Hartmann's seat from the Republicans. LaRossa faced Stockman for a second time in 1993, with the incumbent receiving endorsements from the AFL-CIO, locals of the Communication Workers of America and the New Jersey State Patrolmen's Benevolent Association.[19] LaRossa won re-election despite the challenge.[20] Yuhas stepped down after a single term in office and was replaced on the ballot in 1995 by Reed Gusciora.[21] In the next election, Turner defeated LaRossa in the Senate election while Bonnie Watson Coleman replaced her in the Assembly.

Following the 2000 Census and the 2001 legislative redistricting, West Windsor was shifted to the 14th District but added were Hopewell Township and its two enclave boroughs, Pennington and Hopewell.[22] This addition led to longtime Republican legislator and Pennington resident William E. Schluter to retire from the State Senate and run as an independent in the gubernatorial election that year.[23] For the entire decade, Turner, Gusciora, and Watson Coleman were all reelected to their seats. In the 2011 redistricting, the 15th regained West Windsor and picked up East Amwell, West Amwell, and Lambertville in Hunterdon County, but lost the Princetons to the Republican-leaning 16th District. Gusciora, then a Princeton Township resident, moved to a house in Trenton to continue representing the district.[24] The trio were elected twice more but Watson Coleman was elected to Congress in 2014. To replace Watson Coleman, Mercer and Hunterdon County Democrats chose Mercer County Democratic Party Chair and former Freeholder Elizabeth Maher Muoio.[25]

Muoio was nominated by Governor Phil Murphy to serve as the Treasurer of New Jersey. She resigned from office effective January 15, 2018, as well as from her position as Director of Economic Development for Mercer County in order to begin work in the executive branch, in advance of her April 12 confirmation by the New Jersey Senate; her resignation came less than a week after being sworn into office for her second full term in the Assembly.[26][27] Trenton Councilwoman and Mercer County Democratic Committee chair Verlina Reynolds-Jackson was chosen at a February 10 convention on the second ballot from a field of three candidates to succeed Muoio until a November 2018 special election, and was sworn in on February 15.[28][29]

Gusciora was elected Mayor of Trenton on June 12, 2018.[30] Prior to being sworn in, he resigned from the Assembly on June 30. Mercer County Freeholder Anthony Verrelli, who finished runner-up to Reynolds-Jackson at the previous convention, was chosen at a special convention held on July 26 on the second ballot from a field of four candidates to fill Gusciora's seat; he was sworn in on August 6. Both Reynolds-Jackson and Verrelli will compete in a November 2018 special election to complete the unexpired terms.[31][32]

Session Senate Assembly
1974–1975 Wayne Dumont (R) Robert C. Shelton Jr. (D) Robert Littell (R)
1976–1977 Donald J. Albanese (R) Robert Littell (R)
1978–1979 Wayne Dumont (R) Donald J. Albanese (R) Robert Littell (R)
1980–1981 Donald J. Albanese (R) Robert Littell (R)
1982–1983 Gerald R. Stockman (D) Gerard S. Naples (D) John S. Watson (D)
1984–1985 Gerald R. Stockman (D) Gerard S. Naples (D) John S. Watson (D)
1986–1987 Gerard S. Naples (D) John S. Watson (D)
1988–1989 Gerald R. Stockman (D) Gerard S. Naples (D) John S. Watson (D)
1990–1991[33] Gerard S. Naples (D) John S. Watson (D)
1992–1993 Dick LaRossa (R) John W. Hartmann (R) John S. Watson (D)
1994–1995[20] Dick LaRossa (R) Joseph Yuhas (D) Shirley Turner (D)
1996–1997 Reed Gusciora (D) Shirley Turner (D)
1998–1999[34] Shirley Turner (D) Reed Gusciora (D) Bonnie Watson Coleman (D)
2000–2001[35] Reed Gusciora (D) Bonnie Watson Coleman (D)
2002–2003[36] Shirley Turner (D) Reed Gusciora (D) Bonnie Watson Coleman (D)
2004–2005[37] Shirley Turner (D) Reed Gusciora (D) Bonnie Watson Coleman (D)
2006–2007 Reed Gusciora (D) Bonnie Watson Coleman (D)
2008–2009 Shirley Turner (D) Reed Gusciora (D) Bonnie Watson Coleman (D)
2010–2011 Reed Gusciora (D) Bonnie Watson Coleman (D)
2012–2013 Shirley Turner (D) Reed Gusciora (D) Bonnie Watson Coleman (D)
2014–2015 Shirley Turner (D) Reed Gusciora (D) Bonnie Watson Coleman (D)[n 1]
Elizabeth Maher Muoio (D)[n 2]
2016–2017 Reed Gusciora (D) Elizabeth Maher Muoio (D)
2018–2019 Shirley Turner (D) Reed Gusciora (D)[n 3] Elizabeth Maher Muoio (D)[n 4]
Verlina Reynolds-Jackson (D)[n 5] 
Anthony Verrelli (D)[n 6]
  1. ^ Resigned on January 3, 2015, to take seat in U.S. House of Representatives
  2. ^ Appointed to the Assembly on February 5, 2015
  3. ^ Resigned on June 30, 2018 to become Mayor of Trenton
  4. ^ Resigned on January 15, 2018 to become State Treasurer
  5. ^ Appointed to the Assembly on February 15, 2018
  6. ^ Appointed to the Assembly on August 6, 2018

Election results, 1973–present[edit]

Senate[edit]

New Jersey general election, 2017[38]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Shirley K. Turner 36,624 74.0 Increase 10.7
Republican Lee Eric Newton 12,839 26.0 Decrease 10.7
Total votes 49,463 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2013[39]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Shirley K. Turner 30,250 63.3 Decrease 3.1
Republican Don Cox 17,507 36.7 Increase 3.1
Total votes 47,757 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2011[40]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Shirley K. Turner 21,512 66.4
Republican Donald J. Cox 10,900 33.6
Total votes 32,412 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2007[41]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Shirley K. Turner 20,100 62.8 Decrease 4.6
Republican Bob Martin 11,924 37.2 Increase 4.6
Total votes 32,024 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2003[42]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Shirley K. Turner 24,053 67.4 Decrease 1.7
Republican Calvin O. Iszard 11,638 32.6 Increase 2.9
Total votes 35,691 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2001[43]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Shirley K. Turner 32,289 69.1
Republican Norbert E. Donelly 13,871 29.7
Libertarian Thomas D. Abrams 563 1.2
Total votes 46,723 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1997[44]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Shirley K. Turner 29,995 53.9 Increase 6.2
Republican Dick LaRossa 25,630 46.1 Decrease 6.2
Total votes 55,625 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1993[45]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Dick LaRossa 28,311 52.3 Increase 1.4
Democratic Gerald R. Stockman 25,814 47.7 Decrease 1.4
Total votes 54,125 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1991[46]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Dick LaRossa 22,465 50.9
Democratic Gerald R. Stockman 21,672 49.1
Total votes 44,137 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1987[47]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Gerald R. Stockman 29,747 71.0 Increase 3.7
Republican Norbert E. Donelly 12,132 29.0 Decrease 3.7
Total votes 41,879 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1983[48]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Gerald R. Stockman 29,967 67.3 Increase 10.9
Republican Robert A. Gladstone 14,543 32.7 Decrease 10.9
Total votes 44,510 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1981[49]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Gerald R. Stockman 30,243 56.4
Republican Carmen J. Armenti 23,410 43.6
Total votes 53,653 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1977[50]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Wayne Dumont, Jr. 35,268 60.7 Increase 5.7
Democratic Joseph J. Keslo 22,815 39.3 Decrease 5.7
Total votes 58,083 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1973[51]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Wayne Dumont, Jr. 29,861 55.0
Democratic Martin F. Murphy 24,445 45.0
Total votes 54,306 100.0

Assembly[edit]

Special election, November 6, 2018[52]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Verlina Reynolds-Jackson
Republican Tracy R. Sinatra
Repeal Bail Reform Edward Forchion
Total votes
New Jersey general election, 2017[53]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Reed Gusciora 35,481 37.0 Increase 1.2
Democratic Elizabeth Maher Muoio 34,937 36.4 Increase 2.3
Republican Emily Rich 13,077 13.6 Decrease 1.6
Republican Rimma Yakobovich 12,428 13.0 Decrease 1.9
Total votes 95,923 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2015[54]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Reed Gusciora 17,657 35.8 Increase 4.7
Democratic Elizabeth Maher Muoio 16,845 34.1 Increase 2.7
Republican Anthony L. Giordano 7,502 15.2 Decrease 3.6
Republican Peter Mendonez Jr. 7,345 14.9 Decrease 3.8
Total votes 49,349 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2013[55]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Bonnie Watson Coleman 29,109 31.4 Decrease 1.4
Democratic Reed Gusciora 28,848 31.1 Decrease 1.4
Republican Anthony Giordano 17,429 18.8 Increase 1.4
Republican Kim Taylor 17,310 18.7 Increase 1.4
Total votes 92,696 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2011[56]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Bonnie Watson Coleman 20,505 32.8
Democratic Reed Gusciora 20,350 32.5
Republican Kathy Kilcommons 10,914 17.4
Republican Peter M. Yull 10,817 17.3
Total votes 62,586 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2009[57]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Bonnie Watson Coleman 29,713 32.7 Increase 0.7
Democratic Reed Gusciora 29,215 32.1 Increase 0.9
Republican Kim Taylor 15,418 17.0 Decrease 0.1
Republican Werner Graf 14,781 16.3 Decrease 0.6
Libertarian Daryl Mikell Brooks 939 1.0 N/A
Libertarian Charles Green 884 1.0 N/A
Total votes 90,950 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2007[58]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Bonnie Watson Coleman 19,619 32.0 Decrease 2.7
Democratic Reed Gusciora 19,096 31.2 Decrease 2.3
Republican Norbert E. Donelly 10,489 17.1 Increase 0.9
Republican Sylvester Bobby Bryant 10,331 16.9 Increase 1.4
Green Nicholas Mellis 1,686 2.8 N/A
Total votes 61,221 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2005[59]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Bonnie Watson Coleman 31,929 34.7 Increase 3.6
Democratic Reed Gusciora 30,773 33.5 Increase 3.7
Republican Robert McCready 14,932 16.2 Decrease 1.5
Republican Tom Mavis 14,280 15.5 Decrease 1.7
Total votes 91,914 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2003[60]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Bonnie Watson Coleman 21,550 31.1 Decrease 2.9
Democratic Reed Gusciora 20,639 29.8 Decrease 3.8
Republican Brian McKeon 12,239 17.7 Increase 1.5
Republican Donald Addison 11,914 17.2 Increase 1.7
Green Jill Penn 1,504 2.2 N/A
Green Russell Cullen 1,358 2.0 N/A
Total votes 69,204 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2001[61]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Bonnie Watson Coleman 30,816 34.0
Democratic Reed Gusciora 30,505 33.6
Republican Thomas Dallessio 14,657 16.2
Republican Rosanna Dovgala 14,076 15.5
Libertarian Christopher C. Toto 616 0.7
Total votes 90,670 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1999[62]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Bonnie Watson Coleman 21,465 32.7 Increase 0.5
Democratic Reed Gusciora 21,309 32.5 Increase 2.0
Republican Sidney Goldfarb, M.D. 11,505 17.5 Decrease 2.3
Republican Sheldon Leitner 10,422 15.9 Decrease 1.6
Conservative Len Grzywacz 948 1.4 N/A
Total votes 65,649 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1997[63]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Bonnie Watson Coleman 31,976 32.2 Increase 4.0
Democratic Reed Gusciora 30,235 30.5 Increase 4.2
Republican Wanda Webster Stansbury 19,639 19.8 Decrease 1.1
Republican Channell Wilkins 17,342 17.5 Decrease 2.5
Total votes 99,192 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1995[64][65]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Shirley K. Turner 20,681 28.2 Increase 2.5
Democratic Reed Gusciora 19,294 26.3 Increase 2.6
Republican Joe Constance 15,319 20.9 Decrease 2.6
Republican Gloria S. Teti 14,675 20.0 Increase 1.0
Conservative George E. Borchers 1,131 1.5 N/A
Libertarian Robert D. Figueroa 1,105 1.5 N/A
Conservative Beverly Kidder 1,029 1.4 N/A
Total votes 73,234 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1993[45]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Shirley K. Turner 25,759 25.7 Increase 4.4
Democratic Joseph Yuhas 23,714 23.7 Increase 4.2
Republican John Hartmann 23,495 23.5 Decrease 1.7
Republican Donald C. Addison, Jr. 19,062 19.0 Decrease 2.2
Independent Carl J. Mayer 6,531 6.5 N/A
For the People Tony Belardo 1,361 1.4 N/A
Constitutional Enforcer Clinton C. Barlow 235 0.2 N/A
Total votes 100,157 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1991[46]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Hartmann 22,091 25.2
Democratic John S. Watson 18,713 21.33
Republican Channell Wilkins 18,578 21.18
Democratic Gerard S. Naples 17,081 19.5
Making Government Work Steven Schlossstein 5,148 5.9
Making Government Work W. Oliver “Bucky” Leggett 4,655 5.3
Coalition of One Robert Gunderman 1,448 1.7
Total votes 87,714 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1989[66]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Gerard S. Naples 32,966 33.9 Increase 0.7
Democratic John S. Watson 32,398 33.3 Increase 0.7
Republican Sharon H. Rousseau 16,005 16.5 Decrease 1.0
Republican June C. Morreale 15,802 16.3 Decrease 0.4
Total votes 97,171 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1987[47]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Gerard S. Naples 26,923 33.2 Increase 5.3
Democratic John S. Watson 26,484 32.6 Increase 4.4
Republican Arthur E. Frank 14,193 17.5 Decrease 4.7
Republican John S. Furlong 13,596 16.7 Decrease 5.0
Total votes 81,196 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1985[67]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic John S. Watson 25,173 28.2 Decrease 3.0
Democratic Gerald S. Naples 24,893 27.9 Decrease 3.0
Republican Barbara Marrow 19,818 22.2 Increase 3.0
Republican Mary Ann McKee 19,413 21.7 Increase 3.0
Total votes 89,297 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1983[48]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic John S. Watson 27,413 31.2 Increase 3.7
Democratic Gerard S. Naples 27,210 30.9 Increase 3.8
Republican Joseph P. Teti 16,931 19.2 Decrease 4.4
Republican Herman W. Hanssler 16,449 18.7 Decrease 3.1
Total votes 88,003 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1981[49]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic John S. Watson 27,608 27.5
Democratic Gerard S. Naples 27,270 27.1
Republican Clifford W. Snedeker 23,720 23.6
Republican Richard C. Woodbridge 21,916 21.8
Total votes 100,514 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1979[68]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Donald J. Albanese 27,803 33.9 Increase 2.5
Republican Robert E. Littell 26,879 32.7 Increase 4.0
Democratic David Bogert 12,782 15.6 Decrease 4.8
Democratic Joseph T. Srholez III 11,022 13.4 Decrease 6.1
Independent Mary D. Blohm 3,589 4.4 N/A
Total votes 82,075 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1977[50]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Donald J. Albanese 32,423 31.4 Increase 6.5
Republican Robert E. Littell 29,548 28.7 Decrease 0.2
Democratic George R. Zoffinger 21,051 20.4 Decrease 3.6
Democratic Paul E. Nagel 20,095 19.5 Decrease 2.7
Total votes 103,117 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1975[69]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Robert E. Littell 29,126 28.9 Increase 1.6
Republican Donald J. Albanese 25,106 24.9 Increase 1.4
Democratic Martin F. Murphy 24,141 24.0 Decrease 3.2
Democratic Peter J. Barry 22,333 22.2 Increase 0.2
Total votes 100,706 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1973[51]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Robert E. Littell 28,397 27.3
Democratic Robert C. Shelton, Jr. 28,254 27.2
Republican Walter C. Keogh-Dwyer 24,457 23.5
Democratic Peter Karis 22,882 22.0
Total votes 103,990 100.0

Election results, 1967–1973[edit]

Senate[edit]

New Jersey general election, 1967[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Wayne Dumont, Jr. 42,292 69.6
Democratic William R. Stem 18,450 30.4
Total votes 60,742 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1971[12]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Wayne Dumont, Jr. 28,041 66.6
Democratic Richard V. Laddey 14,072 33.4
Total votes 42,113 100.0

Assembly[edit]

New Jersey general election, 1967[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Douglas E. Gimson 37,121 31.8
Republican Robert E. Littell 36,590 31.4
Democratic Harold J. Curry 22,710 19.5
Democratic Raymond C. McPeek 20,209 17.3
Total votes 116,630 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1969[9]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Walter E. Foran 41,445 30.7
Republican Robert E. Littell 41,177 30.5
Democratic Barry L. Gardner 26,923 20.0
Democratic Richard V. Laddey 25,301 18.8
Total votes 134,846 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1971[12]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Robert E. Littell 23,683 29.7
Republican Walter C. Keogh-Dwyer 20,721 26.0
Democratic Michael P. Martin 18,480 23.2
Democratic David H. Clauss 16,816 21.1
Total votes 79,700 100.0

References[edit]

  1. ^ Districts by Number, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 29, 2014.
  2. ^ DP-1: Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 - 2010 Demographic Profile Data for General Assembly District 15, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 29, 2014.
  3. ^ Statewide Voter Registration Summary, New Jersey Department of State, November 30, 2017. Accessed December 29, 2017.
  4. ^ District 15 Profile, Rutgers University Accessed June 23, 2010.
  5. ^ 2005 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book. Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy. p. 72. 
  6. ^ Legislative Roster 2018-2019 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed August 8, 2018.
  7. ^ District 15 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed August 8, 2018.
  8. ^ New Jersey Apportionment Commission (July 20, 1967). "New Jersey Senate and Assembly Districts" (PDF). Retrieved July 19, 2015. 
  9. ^ a b c "Results of the General Election Held on November 4, 1969" (PDF). Secretary of State of New Jersey. Retrieved July 19, 2015. 
  10. ^ a b State of New Jersey (1971). "New Jersey Senate and Assembly Districts 1972–1973" (PDF). Retrieved July 19, 2015. 
  11. ^ a b c d "Results of the General Election Held on November 7, 1967" (PDF). Secretary of State of New Jersey. Retrieved July 19, 2015. 
  12. ^ a b c d "Results of the General Election Held on November 2, 1971" (PDF). Secretary of State of New Jersey. Retrieved July 19, 2015. 
  13. ^ "In Re Keogh-Dwyer". 1969. Retrieved July 19, 2015. 
  14. ^ "New Jersey Legislative Districts 1974–" (PDF). New Jersey Legislative Services Agency. 1973. Retrieved July 19, 2015. 
  15. ^ "New Jersey Legislative Districts" (PDF). 1981. Retrieved July 19, 2015. 
  16. ^ "1991 Legislative Districts" (PDF). 1991. Archived from the original (PDF) on March 4, 2016. Retrieved July 19, 2015. 
  17. ^ Gray, Jerry. "Television's 'Lottery Guy' Strives to Stay in Senate", The New York Times, September 4, 1992. Accessed June 24, 2010.
  18. ^ Gray, Jerry. "A Legislature With a Less Urban Tone", The New York Times, November 14, 1991. Accessed June 24, 2010.
  19. ^ Sullivan, Joseph F. "'90 Tax Rise Overshadows Trenton Races", The New York Times, October 18, 1993. Accessed June 24, 2010.
  20. ^ a b Sullivan, Joseph F. "The 1993 Elections: New Jersey Legislature; Cut Taxes 30 Percent? Whitman's Top Statehouse Allies Say Not So Fast", The New York Times, November 4, 1993. Accessed June 23, 2010.
  21. ^ Edge, Wally. "Where are they now?", PolitickerNJ.com, November 10, 2006. Accessed June 24, 2010.
  22. ^ "2001 Legislative Districts" (PDF). 2001. Archived from the original (PDF) on August 11, 2011. Retrieved July 19, 2015. 
  23. ^ Jackson, Herb (April 21, 2001). "Score one for New Jersey Democrats". North Jersey Media Group. Retrieved July 19, 2015. The new map puts maverick state Sen. Bill Schluter, R-Mercer, in a district that includes Trenton. Schluter has said he would consider running for governor if his once-safe district was altered. 
  24. ^ Cusido, Carmen (April 5, 2011). "N.J. legislative redistricting forces Mercer area shakeup, Assemblyman Gusciora to move to Trenton". The Trenton Times. Retrieved July 19, 2015. 
  25. ^ Davis, Mike (February 5, 2015). "Elizabeth Maher Muoio sworn in as new assemblywoman in 15th District". The Times. Retrieved July 19, 2015. 
  26. ^ Curran, Phillip Sean. "Assemblywoman Muoio resigns, creating vacancy in legislature", CentralJersey.com, January 17, 2018. "State Assemblywoman Liz Muoio, a Democrat who represented parts of Mercer and Hunterdon counties since 2015, resigned her seat to join the Murphy administration, thus creating a vacancy that many Democrats want to fill.... But she submitted her resignation to the Assembly clerk on Friday to become acting state Treasurer until she gets confirmed by the Democrat-controlled state Senate. Her resignation took effect at the end of business Monday, according to an aide. She also left her job as the Mercer County director of economic development."
  27. ^ Reitmeyer, John (April 13, 2018). "SENATE APPROVES MUOIO FOR STATE TREASURER, ONLY SECOND WOMAN TO GET THE NOD". NJ Spotlight. Retrieved August 12, 2018. 
  28. ^ Abdur-Rahman, Sulaiman (February 10, 2018). "Trenton Councilwoman Verlina Reynolds-Jackson wins Assembly seat, succeeds Liz Muoio". The Trentonian. Retrieved February 11, 2018. 
  29. ^ Johnson, Brent (February 15, 2018). "Meet N.J.'s newest Assembly member". NJ.com. Retrieved February 15, 2018. 
  30. ^ Foster, David (June 12, 2018). "Assemblyman Reed Gusciora becomes Trenton's first openly gay mayor in historic win". The Trentonian. Retrieved July 1, 2018. 
  31. ^ Abdur-Rahman, Sulaiman (July 26, 2018). "Mercer Freeholder Verrelli wins appointment to Gusciora's vacant Assembly seat". The Trentonian. Retrieved August 8, 2018. 
  32. ^ Biryukov, Nikita (August 6, 2018). "Verrelli sworn in". New Jersey Globe. Retrieved August 8, 2018. 
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