15th legislature of the French Fifth Republic

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15th legislature of the French Fifth Republic
XVe législature de la Cinquième République française
Coat of arms or logo
History
Founded 21 June 2017 (2017-06-21)
Preceded by 14th legislature
Leadership
Philippe II, REMMoDem
Since 21 June 2017
Structure
Seats 577 deputies
Assemblée nationale 2017-11-30.svg
Political groups
  •      GDR (16)
  •      FI (17)
  •      NG (31)
  •      REM (312)
  •      MoDem (47)
  •      UAI (32)
  •      LR (102)
  •      NI (18)
  •      Vacant (2)
Elections
Two-round system
Last election
11 and 18 June 2017

The 15th legislature of the French Fifth Republic (French: XVe législature de la Cinquième République française) is a parliamentary cycle that commenced on 21 June 2017 following the legislative elections on 11 and 18 June 2017. The party of the president Emmanuel Macron, La République En Marche! (REM), obtained an absolute majority of 308 deputies, alongside its ally, the Democratic Movement (MoDem), which secured 42 seats. The new deputies elected François de Rugy the President of the National Assembly when it first convened on 27 June. The legislative elections saw a record level of renewal, with only a quarter of deputies elected in 2012 also elected in 2017, and a significant increase in the representation of women and youth. With 7 planned parliamentary groups, it would be the most fragmented assembly since 1958.

It was preceded by the 14th legislature.

Composition of the executive[edit]

Composition of the National Assembly[edit]

Proportion of women elected
to the National Assembly[1]
2017 elections
38.8%
2012 elections
26.9%
2007 elections
18.5%
2002 elections
12.1%
1997 elections
10.8%
1993 elections
5.9%
1988 elections
5.6%

A record number and proportion of women were elected in the legislative elections, with 224 in total representing 38.8% of the National Assembly. This was a 11.9 percentage point increase over the previous legislature in which 155 women were elected deputies, representing 26.9% of the composition.[1]

The average age of deputies in the 15th legislature was also significantly lower than that of the previous, at 48 years and 240 days compared to the previous legislature at 53 years and 195 days. The number of deputies under 30 years old soared from 4 to 29, while the number from 30 to 49 years old increased from 197 to 271, and the number of deputies between 60 and 69 years old was halved from 171 to 87.[2]

Higher professions continued to remain dominant in the assembly despite these changes.[2]

The legislative elections also saw a massive degree of renewal, with only a quarter of deputies elected in 2012 being re-elected in 2017; of the 354 outgoing deputies who stood for re-election, only 148 won. A total of 429 deputies elected to the 15th legislature were not elected in 2012. The renewal can be explained in part by the large number of outgoing deputies who did not seek to retain their seat: 223 deputies, representing 39% of the assembly. Of the 354 who did present themselves, 125 were eliminated in the first round on 11 June, 81 were defeated in the second round, and 148 were re-elected.[3]

Changes in composition[edit]

Members of the National Assembly who join the government are required to give up their seats to their substitutes (suppléants) a month after their appointment, as stipulated in the constitution.[4] Should ministers quit the government, they recover their seat in the National Assembly from their substitute a month after their resignation. By-elections are held in the event of the annulation of electoral results or vacancies caused by resignations (in most circumstances not those related to the death of a deputy, in which case the substitute takes the seat if possible), except within the year before legislative elections.[5]

The appointment of the Philippe I government obligated several appointed ministers to give up their seats in the National Assembly to their substitutes: specifically, Minister of Economy and Finance Bruno Le Maire (Eure's 1st constituency) in favor of Séverine Gipson; Secretary of State for the Digital Sector Mounir Mahjoubi (Paris's 16th constituency) in favor of Delphine O; Minister for Europe and Foreign Affairs Marielle de Sarnez (Paris's 11th constituency) in favor of Maud Gatel; Minister of Territorial Cohesion Richard Ferrand (Finistère's 6th constituency) in favor of Lætitia Dolliou; Minister for Overseas France Annick Girardin (Saint-Pierre-et-Miquelon's 1st constituency) in favor of Stéphane Claireaux; and Secretary of State for Relations with Parliament and Government Spokesman Christophe Castaner (Alpes-de-Haute-Provence's 2nd constituency) in favor of Emmanuelle Fontaine-Domeizel.[6] Following a reshuffle and the formation of the Philippe II government, Ferrand took his seat after his ephemeral ministerial tenure, as did de Sarnez after her departure from the government.[7]

By-elections[edit]

Dates Constituency Incumbent deputy Party Group Elected deputy Party Reason for by-election Ref(s)
28 Jan and 4 Feb 2018 Val-d'Oise's 1st Isabelle Muller-Quoy REM REM Antoine Savignat LR Election invalidated by the Constitutional Council [8][9][10]
28 Jan and 4 Feb 2018 Territoire de Belfort's 1st Ian Boucard LR LR Ian Boucard LR Election invalidated by the Constitutional Council [11][12][13]
4 Mar and 11 Mar 2018 French Guiana's 2nd Lénaïck Adam REM REM Lénaïck Adam REM Election invalidated by the Constitutional Council [14][15]
11 Mar and 18 Mar 2018 Haute-Garonne's 8th Joël Aviragnet PS NG Joël Aviragnet PS Election invalidated by the Constitutional Council [16][17]
18 Mar and 25 Mar 2018 Loiret's 4th Jean-Pierre Door LR LR Jean-Pierre Door LR Election invalidated by the Constitutional Council [18][19]
18 Mar and 25 Mar 2018 Mayotte's 1st Ramlati Ali PS REM Ramlati Ali REM Election invalidated by the Constitutional Council [20][21]
8 Apr and 22 Apr 2018 French residents overseas' 5th Samantha Cazebonne REM REM Samantha Cazebonne REM Election invalidated by the Constitutional Council [22][23]
15 Apr and 22 Apr 2018 Wallis and Futuna's 1st Napole Polutele DVG UAI app. Sylvain Brial SE Election invalidated by the Constitutional Council [24][25]
TBD Réunion's 7th Thierry Robert MoDem MoDem Declared ineligible by the Constitutional Council [26]

Election of the President of the National Assembly[edit]

The election of the President of the National Assembly occurred on 27 June at 15:00 CEST at the Palais Bourbon. The election, conducted by secret ballot, was presided over by the oldest member of the National Assembly (Bernard Brochant, LR), assisted by the six youngest deputies in the National Assembly, who serve as secretaries,[27] namely, Ludovic Pajot, Typhanie Degois, Lénaïck Adam, Pierre Henriet, Robin Reda, and Bénédicte Peyrol.[28] If, after two rounds, no candidate receives an absolute majority of votes, only a relative majority is required for election in the third ballot. Though the government indicated its preference for a politician from the right to take the position, a number of members of La République En Marche! voiced support for electing a president from among their ranks. Emmanuel Macron has also indicated a preference for a woman to become president of the assembly.[29] Deputies named as ministers may not participate in the election of the president of the assembly, and their substitutes are only be seated a month after the formation of the government (21 July).

Three deputies under the REM label sought to seek the election as President of the National Assembly. After his re-election in Loire-Atlantique's 1st constituency on 18 June, the ecologist François de Rugy announced his intention to seek the presidency of the assembly, having made known his intentions to Macron.[30] The candidacies of Sophie Errante and Brigitte Bourguignon were revealed discreetly on 23 June; both women served a single term after elected under the Socialist label in the 2012 legislative elections.[31] LR deputy Jean-Charles Taugourdeau also presented himself as a candidate "for the form", according to the entourage of the Christian Jacob, the president of The Republicans group,[32] in addition to Laure de la Raudière for the "constructives" group, Laurence Dumont for the "New Left" (former socialist) group, and Caroline Fiat for the FI group. The REM candidate François de Rugy was designated by a vote of members; with 301 votes, a total of 153 votes were cast for de Rugy, 59 for Errante, 54 for Bourguignon, 32 for Philippe Folliot (whose candidacy was announced on 27 June by government spokesman Christophe Castaner), 2 blank votes, and 1 null vote.[33] De Rugy was ultimately elected president of the assembly with 353 votes, against 94 for Taugourdeau, 34 for de La Raudière, 32 for Dumont, and 30 for Fiat, with 567 votes of which 543 were expressed.[34]

Candidate Constituency Political
group
Votes %
François de Rugy Loire-Atlantique's 1st REM 353 65.01
Jean-Charles Taugourdeau Maine-et-Loire's 3rd LR 94 17.31
Laure de La Raudière Eure-et-Loir's 3rd LC 34 6.26
Laurence Dumont Calvados's 2nd NG 32 5.89
Caroline Fiat Meurthe-et-Moselle's 6th FI 30 5.52
Votes 567 100.00
Blank and null votes 24 4.23
Expressed votes 543 95.77
Designation of the REM candidate[33]
Candidate Constituency Political
group
Votes
François de Rugy Loire-Atlantique's 1st REM 153
Sophie Errante Loire-Atlantique's 10th REM 59
Brigitte Bourguignon Pas-de-Calais's 6th REM 54
Philippe Folliot Tarn's 1st REM 32
Votes 301
Blank votes 2
Null votes 1

Parliamentary groups[edit]

Parliamentary groups had until June 26 to elect their presidents, and on 27 June political groups were officially registered within the National Assembly through the rendering of a political declaration signed by each of its members.[29] With 7 parliamentary groups, this National Assembly would be the most fragmented since 1958.[35]

The Democratic Movement (MoDem) sought to form its own group in the National Assembly independent of that of La République En Marche!, with more than the 15 seats required to form a parliamentary group.[36] The French Communist Party and la France Insoumise, which failed to secure an alliance during the preceding legislative elections,[37] also chose to form independent groups in the National Assembly, with André Chassaigne of the PCF announcing the continuation of the previous group on 21 June, including 11 of its own deputies and 4 from overseas France, but without opposition to the FI group. Jean-Luc Mélenchon's demand to impose voting discipline and an obligation to respect the program of his movement prevented the creation of a common group.[38]

In the aftermath of the legislative elections, the split between Macron-compatible "constructives" within the Republicans (LR) and the rest of the party re-emerged. On 21 June, Thierry Solère announced the creation of a new common group in the National Assembly with the Union of Democrats and Independents (UDI) likely to contain 18 UDI and about 15 LR deputies. The formation of two parliamentary groups on the right represented a symbolic divorce to the two threads on the right (the moderates and the hardliners) and the end of the old Union for a Popular Movement (UMP) which had been created in 2002 to unite the right and centre.[39]

On 21 June, Christian Jacob was re-elected to lead the Republicans group with 62 votes against Damien Abad with 32 votes.[40] Olivier Faure was re-elected as president of the New Left group on 22 June with 28 votes against Delphine Batho with 3 votes,[41] Richard Ferrand was elected president of the La République En Marche group on 24 June with 306 votes and 2 abstentions,[42] Marc Fesneau was unanimously elected president of the Democratic Movement group on 25 June with 42 votes,[43] Mélenchon was unanimously elected president of la France insoumise group on 27 June, the "constructives" group selected Franck Riester (LR) and Stéphane Demilly (UDI) as co-chairs, and the GDR will continue to be presided over by André Chassaigne.[33]

Composition of the National Assembly as of 11 April 2018[44]
Parliamentary group Members Related Total President
REM La République En Marche 310 2 312 Richard Ferrand
LR The Republicans 98 4 102 Christian Jacob
MoDem Democratic Movement and affiliated 41 6 47 Marc Fesneau
UAI UDI, Agir and Independents 32 0 32 Franck Riester, Jean-Christophe Lagarde
NG New Left 28 3 31 Valérie Rabault
FI La France Insoumise 17 0 17 Jean-Luc Mélenchon
GDR Democratic and Republican Left 16 0 16 André Chassaigne
NI Non-inscrits 18
Vacant, pending Wallis and Futuna, overseas by-elections 2

Bureau of the National Assembly[edit]

The National Assembly elected six vice presidents, three quaestors, and twelve secretaries on 14 April 2018.[45]

Composition of the bureau[46]
Post Name Constituency Group
President François de Rugy Loire-Atlantique's 1st REM
Vice president Carole Bureau-Bonnard Oise's 6th REM
Hugues Renson Paris's 13th REM
Sylvain Waserman Bas-Rhin's 2nd constituency Modem
Marc Le Fur Côtes-d'Armor's 3rd LR
Annie Genevard Doubs's 5th LR
Yves Jégo Seine-et-Marne's 3rd UAI
Quaestor Florian Bachelier Ille-et-Vilaine's 8th REM
Laurianne Rossi Hauts-de-Seine's 11th REM
Éric Ciotti Alpes-Maritimes's 1st LR
Secretary Lénaïck Adam French Guiana's 2nd REM
Ramlati Ali Mayotte's 1st REM
Clémentine Autain Seine-Saint-Denis's 11th FI
Danielle Brulebois Jura's 1st REM
Luc Carvounas Val-de-Marne's 9th NG
Lionel Causse Landes's 2nd REM
Laurence Dumont Calvados's 2nd NG
Marie Guévenoux Essonne's 9th REM
Annaïg Le Meur Finistère's 1st REM
Sophie Mette Gironde's 9th MoDem
Gabriel Serville French Guiana's 1st GDR
Guillaume Vuilletet Val-d'Oise's 2nd REM

Former members of National Assembly's Bureau[edit]

Post Name Constituency Group Mandate
Vice president Cendra Motin Isère's 6th REM June 28, 2017 - November 7, 2017 [47]
Danielle Brulebois Jura's 1st REM June 28, 2017 - November 7, 2017 [48]
Sacha Houlié Vienne's 2nd REM June 28, 2017 - January 16, 2018 [49]
Quaestor Thierry Solère Hauts-de-Seine's 9th UAI, later REM June 28, 2017 - January 16, 2018 [50]
Secretary Lénaïck Adam French Guiana's 2nd REM June 28, 2017 - December 8, 2017
Ramlati Ali Mayotte's 1st REM June 28, 2017 - January 19, 2018
Stéphanie Do Seine-et-Marne's 10th REM June 28, 2017 - January 31, 2018
Marie Lebec Yvelines's 4th REM February 1, 2018 - April 3, 2018

Presidencies of committees[edit]

The presidencies of the eight standing committees was divided between the political groups on 29 June.[33]

Presidencies of committees[46]
Standing committees President Group
Cultural and Education Affairs Committee Bruno Studer REM
Economic Affairs Committee Roland Lescure REM
Foreign Affairs Committee Marielle de Sarnez MoDem
Social Affairs Committee Brigitte Bourguignon REM
National Defence and Armed Forces Committee Jean-Jacques Bridey REM
Sustainable Development, Spatial and Regional Planning Committee Barbara Pompili REM
Finance, General Economy and Budgetary Monitoring Committee Éric Woerth LR
Constitutional Acts, Legislation and General Administration Committee Yaël Braun-Pivet REM
Other committee President Group
European Affairs Committee Sabine Thillaye REM

Vote of confidence[edit]

In the vote of confidence in the new government on 4 July 2017, 370 voted in favor, 67 opposed, and 129 abstained,[51] representing a record level of abstention and the lowest level of opposition since 1959.[52]

Vote of confidence on 4 July 2017[51]
For Against Abstentions Non-voting
370
  • REM (305)
  • MoDem (46)
  • LC (12)
  • NG (3)
  • NI (3)
  • LR (1)
67
  • LR (23)
  • FI (17)
  • GDR (12)
  • NI (10)
  • NG (5)
129
  • LR (75)
  • LC (23)
  • NG (23)
  • GDR (4)
  • NI (4)
11
  • REM (9)
  • LR (1)
  • MoDem (1)

Results of the legislative elections[edit]

e • d Summary of the 11 and 18 June 2017 French National Assembly election results
Assemble Nationale française - 15 Législature - Partis politiques en juin 2017.svg
Parties and coalitions First round Second round Total
Votes % Seats Votes % Seats Seats %
La République En Marche! REM 6,391,269 28.21 2 7,826,245 43.06 306 308 53.38
Democratic Movement MoDem 932,227 4.12 0 1,100,656 6.06 42 42 7.28
Presidential majority (centre) 7,323,496 32.33 2 8,926,901 49.11 348 350 60.66
The Republicans LR 3,573,427 15.77 0 4,040,203 22.23 112 112 19.41
Union of Democrats and Independents UDI 687,225 3.03 1 551,784 3.04 17 18 3.12
Miscellaneous right DVD 625,345 2.76 0 306,074 1.68 6 6 1.04
Parliamentary right 4,885,997 21.57 1 4,898,061 26.95 135 136 23.57
Socialist Party PS 1,685,677 7.44 0 1,032,842 5.68 30 30 5.20
Miscellaneous left DVG 362,281 1.60 1 263,488 1.45 11 12 2.08
Radical Party of the Left PRG 106,311 0.47 0 64,860 0.36 3 3 0.52
Parliamentary left 2,154,269 9.51 1 1,361,190 7.49 44 45 7.80
La France Insoumise FI 2,497,622 11.03 0 883,573 4.86 17 17 2.95
French Communist Party PCF 615,487 2.72 0 217,833 1.20 10 10 1.73
National Front FN 2,990,454 13.20 0 1,590,869 8.75 8 8 1.39
Regionalists REG 204,049 0.90 0 137,490 0.76 5 5 0.87
Miscellaneous DIV 500,309 2.21 0 100,574 0.55 3 3 0.52
Ecologists ECO 973,527 4.30 0 23,197 0.13 1 1 0.17
Debout la France DLF 265,420 1.17 0 17,344 0.10 1 1 0.17
Far-right EXD 68,320 0.30 0 19,034 0.10 1 1 0.17
Far-left EXG 175,214 0.77 0 0 0.00
Total 22,654,164 100.00 4 18,176,066 100.00 573 577 100.00
Valid votes 22,654,164 97.78 18,176,066 90.14
Blank ballots 357,018 1.54 1,409,784 6.99
Null ballots 156,326 0.67 578,765 2.87
Turnout 23,167,508 48.70 20,164,615 42.64
Abstentions 24,403,480 51.30 27,128,488 57.36
Registered voters 47,570,988 47,293,103

Source: Ministry of the Interior

Successive governments[edit]

  • Philippe II since 21 June 2017, lasting 1 year, 59 days

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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  3. ^ Adrien Sénécat (19 June 2017). "Après les législatives 2017, 75 % de l'Assemblée nationale est renouvelée, un record". Le Monde. Retrieved 25 June 2017. 
  4. ^ Astrid de Villaines (23 June 2012). "Arrivée des 25 députés suppléants de ministres à l'Assemblée nationale". LCP. Retrieved 25 June 2012. 
  5. ^ "Code électoral, Chapitre IX : Remplacement des députés". Légifrance. Retrieved 25 June 2017. 
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  16. ^ "Décision n° 2017-5098/5159 AN du 18 décembre 2017". Conseil constitutionnel. 18 December 2017. Retrieved 4 February 2018. 
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  18. ^ "Décision n° 2017-5092 AN du 18 décembre 2017". Conseil constitutionnel. 18 December 2017. Retrieved 4 February 2018. 
  19. ^ "Décret n° 2018-45 du 29 janvier 2018 portant convocation des électeurs pour l'élection d'un député à l'Assemblée nationale (4e circonscription du Loiret)". Légifrance. 31 January 2018. Retrieved 4 February 2018. 
  20. ^ "Décision n° 2017-5126 AN du 19 janvier 2018". Conseil constitutionnel. 19 January 2018. Retrieved 4 February 2018. 
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  22. ^ "Décision n° 2017-5052 AN du 2 février 2018". Conseil constitutionnel. 2 February 2018. Retrieved 4 February 2018. 
  23. ^ "Décret n° 2018-116 du 20 février 2018 portant convocation des électeurs pour l'élection d'un député à l'Assemblée nationale (5e circonscription des Français établis hors de France)". Légifrance. 21 February 2018. Retrieved 22 February 2018. 
  24. ^ "Décision n° 2017-5162 AN du 2 février 2018". Conseil constitutionnel. 2 February 2018. Retrieved 4 February 2018. 
  25. ^ "Décret n° 2018-145 du 1er mars 2018 portant convocation des électeurs pour l'élection d'un député à l'Assemblée nationale (circonscription des îles Wallis et Futuna)". Légifrance. 2 March 2018. Retrieved 2 March 2018. 
  26. ^ "Décision n° 2018-1 OF du 6 juillet 2018". Conseil constitutionnel. 6 July 2018. Retrieved 16 July 2018. 
  27. ^ Noah Moulinet (21 June 2017). "Présidence de l'Assemblée nationale : LR ou LREM, à qui le perchoir?". Europe 1. Retrieved 25 June 2017. 
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  29. ^ a b Julien Licourt (19 June 2017). "Remaniement, président de l'Assemblée, vote de confiance... l'agenda chargé des prochains jours". Le Figaro. Retrieved 25 June 2017. 
  30. ^ Arthur Berdah (19 June 2017). "À peine réélu, François de Rugy postule à la présidence de l'Assemblée". Le Figaro. Retrieved 25 June 2017. 
  31. ^ Philippe Mathon (23 June 2017). "INFO LCP - Deux femmes candidates au "perchoir" de l'Assemblée nationale". LCP. Retrieved 25 June 2017. 
  32. ^ Loris Boichot (26 June 2017). "Assemblée nationale : trois «marcheurs» pour un perchoir". Le Figaro. Retrieved 27 June 2017. 
  33. ^ a b c d "En direct : Mélenchon élu à la tête du groupe de La France insoumise à l'Assemblée". Le Monde. 27 June 2017. Retrieved 27 June 2017. 
  34. ^ "LIVE POLITIQUE - Réforme du code du Travail : la CGT appelle à une journée de grève le 12 septembre". LCI. 27 June 2017. Retrieved 28 June 2017. 
  35. ^ Etienne Baldit (21 June 2017). "Il n'y a jamais eu autant de groupes à l'Assemblée nationale... depuis 1958". Europe 1. Retrieved 25 June 2017. 
  36. ^ Christophe Forcari (10 May 2017). "Pourquoi le Modem veut-il son propre groupe à l'Assemblée nationale ?". Libération. Retrieved 25 June 2017. 
  37. ^ Rachid Laïreche (9 May 2017). "Législatives : pas d'accord entre la France insoumise et le PCF". Libération. Retrieved 25 June 2017. 
  38. ^ "Les communistes ne s'allient pas à La France insoumise à l'Assemblée nationale". Le Monde. Agence France-Presse. 21 June 2017. Retrieved 25 June 2017. 
  39. ^ Matthieu Goar (21 June 2017). "Assemblée nationale : la droite consacre son divorce". Le Monde. Retrieved 25 June 2017. 
  40. ^ Clémence Bauduin (21 June 2017). "Les Républicains : Christian Jacob réélu président du groupe à l'Assemblée". RTL. Agence France-Presse. Retrieved 25 June 2017. 
  41. ^ "Olivier Faure réélu à la tête du groupe socialiste de l'Assemblée nationale". Le Monde. Agence France-Presse. 22 June 2017. Retrieved 25 June 2017. 
  42. ^ "L'ex-ministre Richard Ferrand élu président du groupe La République en marche à l'Assemblée". franceinfo. Agence France-Presse. 24 June 2017. Retrieved 25 June 2017. 
  43. ^ "Marc Fesneau élu président du groupe MoDem à l'Assemblée nationale". Le Figaro. 25 June 2017. Retrieved 25 June 2017. 
  44. ^ "Effectif des groupes politiques". Assemblée nationale. Retrieved 11 April 2018. 
  45. ^ "Le Bureau de l'Assemblée nationale". National Assembly (in French). Retrieved 14 April 2018. 
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  50. ^ "Thierry Solère n'est plus questeur de l'Assemblée" (in French). 20 minutes. Retrieved 14 April 2018. 
  51. ^ a b "Scrutin public sur la déclaration de politique générale du Gouvernement de M. Édouard Philippe (application de l'article 49, alinéa premier, de la Constitution)" (PDF). Assemblée nationale. 4 July 2017. Retrieved 4 July 2017. 
  52. ^ "Discours de politique générale de Philippe : ce qu'il faut retenir des annonces du premier ministre". Le Monde. 4 July 2017. Retrieved 4 July 2017. 

External links[edit]