1604 Tombaugh

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
1604 Tombaugh
Discovery [1]
Discovered by C. O. Lampland
Discovery site Lowell Obs.
Discovery date 24 March 1931
Designations
MPC designation (1604) Tombaugh
Named after
Clyde Tombaugh
(astronomer)[2]
1931 FH · 1930 DX
1933 SA1 · 1936 FA
1937 JH · 1941 CF
1943 OE · 1948 ME
1949 ST1 · A920 EC
main-belt · Eos[3]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 96.51 yr (35,252 days)
Aphelion 3.3309 AU
Perihelion 2.7161 AU
3.0235 AU
Eccentricity 0.1017
5.26 yr (1,920 days)
359.39°
0° 11m 15s / day
Inclination 9.3941°
309.10°
38.199°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 28.78±0.53 km[4]
32.25 km (derived)[3]
32.33±2.2 km (IRAS:3)[5]
6.15 h (dated)[6]
7.04 h (dated)[7]
7.047±0.004 h[8]
7.056±0.001 h[9]
8.2 h (dated)[10]
0.0933 (derived)[3]
0.1038±0.016 (IRAS:3)[5]
0.138±0.006[4]
B–V = 0.751[1]
U–B = 0.373[1]
XSCU (Tholen)[1] · Xc (SMASS)[1] · X[3]
10.4[1] · 10.53[5][4] · 10.65[3][7] · 10.93±0.15[11]

1604 Tombaugh, provisional designation 1931 FH, is a rare-type Eoan asteroid from the outer region of the asteroid belt, approximately 32 kilometers in diameter.

It was discovered on 24 March 1931, by American astronomer Carl Otto Lampland at Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, Arizona, in the United States.[12] It was named after the discoverer of Pluto, Clyde Tombaugh.[2]

Classification and orbit[edit]

Tombaugh is a member of the Eos family that orbits the Sun in the outer main-belt at a distance of 2.7–3.3 AU once every 5 years and 3 months (1,920 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.10 and an inclination of 9° with respect to the ecliptic.[1] Its observation arc begins at Flagstaff, one year prior to its official discovery observation at Lowell Observatory. It had been previously identified at Heidelberg as A920 EC in 1920, and as 1930 DX in 1930.[12]

Physical characteristics[edit]

Tombaugh is classified as a X-type asteroid. It is also classified as a rare XSCU type in the Tholen, and as a transitional Xc type in the SMASS taxonomy.[1]

Rotation period[edit]

In April 2010 and November 2012, rotational lightcurves of Tombaugh were obtained from photometric observations at Oakley Southern Sky Observatory, Australia, and at Bassano Bresciano Observatory, Italy. Lightcurve analysis gave a rotation period of 7.047 and 7.056 hours with a brightness variation of 0.16 and 0.35 magnitude, respectively (U=2+/2+).[8][9]

These periods supersede previous results obtained by astronomers Claes-Ingvar Lagerkvist (1975), Richard P. Binzel (1984) and Krisztián Sárneczky (U=1/2/2).[6][7][10]

Diameter and albedo[edit]

According to the surveys carried out by the Infrared Astronomical Satellite IRAS and the Japanese Akari satellite, Tombaugh measures 28.78 and 32.33 kilometers in diameter, and its surface has an albedo of 0.138 and 0.104, respectively.[4][5] The Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link derives an albedo of 0.0933 and a diameter of 32.25 kilometers with an absolute magnitude of 10.65.[3]

Naming[edit]

This minor planet was named for American astronomer Clyde Tombaugh (1906–1997), famous for his discovery of Pluto in 1930. The discovering Lowell Observatory named this asteroid on the occasion of a symposium on Pluto, held in 1980. When Tombaugh examined the photographic plates during the trans-Saturnian search program at the Lowell Observatory, he also marked over 4,000 minor planets on these plates.[2] The approved naming citation was published by the Minor Planet Center on 1 April 1980 (M.P.C. 5280).[13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1604 Tombaugh (1931 FH)" (2016-09-14 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 30 June 2017. 
  2. ^ a b c Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1604) Tombaugh. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 127. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 29 December 2016. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f "LCDB Data for (1604) Tombaugh". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 29 December 2016. 
  4. ^ a b c d Usui, Fumihiko; Kuroda, Daisuke; Müller, Thomas G.; Hasegawa, Sunao; Ishiguro, Masateru; Ootsubo, Takafumi; et al. (October 2011). "Asteroid Catalog Using Akari: AKARI/IRC Mid-Infrared Asteroid Survey". Publications of the Astronomical Society of Japan. 63 (5): 1117–1138. Bibcode:2011PASJ...63.1117U. doi:10.1093/pasj/63.5.1117. Retrieved 29 December 2016. 
  5. ^ a b c d Tedesco, E. F.; Noah, P. V.; Noah, M.; Price, S. D. (October 2004). "IRAS Minor Planet Survey V6.0". NASA Planetary Data System. Bibcode:2004PDSS...12.....T. Retrieved 29 December 2016. 
  6. ^ a b Sárneczky, K.; Szabó, Gy.; Kiss, L. L. (June 1999). "CCD observations of 11 faint asteroids". Astronomy and Astrophysics Supplement: 363–368. Bibcode:1999A&AS..137..363S. doi:10.1051/aas:1999251. Retrieved 29 December 2016. 
  7. ^ a b c Binzel, R. P. (October 1987). "A photoelectric survey of 130 asteroids". Icarus: 135–208. Bibcode:1987Icar...72..135B. doi:10.1016/0019-1035(87)90125-4. ISSN 0019-1035. Retrieved 29 December 2016. 
  8. ^ a b Albers, Kenda; Kragh, Katherine; Monnier, Adam; Pligge, Zachary; Stolze, Kellen; West, Josh; et al. (October 2010). "Asteroid Lightcurve Analysis at the Oakley Southern Sky Observatory: 2009 October thru 2010 April". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 37 (4): 152–158. Bibcode:2010MPBu...37..152A. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 29 December 2016. 
  9. ^ a b Strabla, Luca; Quadri, Ulisse; Girelli, Robert (April 2013). "Asteroid Observed from Bassano Bresciano Observatory 2012 August-September". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 40 (2): 83–84. Bibcode:2013MPBu...40...83S. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 29 December 2016. 
  10. ^ a b Lagerkvist, C.-I. (March 1978). "Photographic photometry of 110 main-belt asteroids". Astronomy and Astrophysics Supplement Series: 361–381. Bibcode:1978A&AS...31..361L. Retrieved 29 December 2016. 
  11. ^ Veres, Peter; Jedicke, Robert; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Denneau, Larry; Granvik, Mikael; Bolin, Bryce; et al. (November 2015). "Absolute magnitudes and slope parameters for 250,000 asteroids observed by Pan-STARRS PS1 - Preliminary results". Icarus. 261: 34–47. arXiv:1506.00762Freely accessible. Bibcode:2015Icar..261...34V. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2015.08.007. Retrieved 29 December 2016. 
  12. ^ a b "1604 Tombaugh (1931 FH)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 29 December 2016. 
  13. ^ "MPC/MPO/MPS Archive". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 29 December 2016. 

External links[edit]