1692 Subbotina

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1692 Subbotina
Discovery [1]
Discovered by G. Neujmin
Discovery site Simeiz Obs.
Discovery date 16 August 1936
Designations
MPC designation (1692) Subbotina
Named after
Mikhail F. Subbotin
(Soviet scientist)[2][3]
1936 QD · 1927 SL
1930 FG · 1931 OA
1935 GJ · 1935 JJ
1940 LK · 1941 SO1
1941 UA · 1949 HL1
1950 RZ · 1951 YM1
1955 SO2 · 1964 RC
main-belt · (central)
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 87.00 yr (31,776 days)
Aphelion 3.1714 AU
Perihelion 2.4001 AU
2.7857 AU
Eccentricity 0.1384
4.65 yr (1,698 days)
162.29°
0° 12m 43.2s / day
Inclination 2.4277°
199.66°
112.18°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 35.17±9.84 km[4]
36.075±0.380 km[5][6]
36.53 km (derived)[7]
36.59±1.7 km (IRAS:11)[8]
38.11±0.53 km[9]
39.89±6.80 km[10]
43.01±0.99 km[11]
9.2457±0.0005 h[12]
0.02±0.00[11]
0.034±0.012[10]
0.0400 (derived)[7]
0.04±0.03[4]
0.045±0.002[9]
0.0479±0.005 (IRAS:11)[8]
0.049±0.006[5][6]
SMASS = Cg [1] · C[7]
11.1[5][8][9] · 11.20[4] · 11.3[1][7][10] · 11.48[11]

1692 Subbotina, provisional designation 1936 QD, is a carbonaceous asteroid from the middle region of the asteroid belt, approximately 37 kilometers in diameter. Discovered by Grigory Neujmin at the Crimean Simeiz Observatory in 1936, it was later named after Soviet scientist Mikhail F. Subbotin.

Discovery[edit]

Subbotina was discovered by Russian astronomer Grigory Neujmin at the Crimean Simeiz Observatory on 16 August 1936.[13] On the following night, astronomer Karl Reinmuth independently discovered the body at Heidelberg Observatory, Germany.[2]

The asteroid was identified as 1927 SL at the discovering observatory in 1927, its first used observation was made at Heidelberg in 1931, extending the body's observation arc by 5 years prior to its official discovery observation.[13]

Orbit and classification[edit]

This asteroid orbits the Sun in the central main-belt at a distance of 2.4–3.2 AU once every 4 years and 8 months (1,698 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.14 and an inclination of 2° with respect to the ecliptic.[1]

Physical characteristics[edit]

In the SMASS taxonomic scheme, Subbotina is characterized as a dark Cg-type, a subtype of the wider group of carbonaceous C-type asteroids.[1]

Diameter and albedo[edit]

According to the space-based surveys carried out by the Infrared Astronomical Satellite IRAS, the Japanese Akari satellite, and NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer with its subsequent NEOWISE mission, Subbotina measures between 35.17 and 43.01 kilometers in diameter and its surface has a notably low albedo in the range of 0.02 to 0.049.[4][5][8][9][10][11] The Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link derives an albedo of 0.04 and a diameter of 36.5 kilometers with an absolute magnitude of 11.3.[7]

Rotation period[edit]

A rotational lightcurve of Subbotina was obtained from photometric observations made by Italian astronomer Silvano Casulli and French astronomer Laurent Bernasconi in October 2006. Lightcurve analysis gave a well-defined rotation period of 9.2457±0.0005 hours with a brightness variation of 0.3 in magnitude (U=3).[12] Somewhat higher amplitudes of 0.42 and 0.62 magnitude were found by the NEOWISE mission.[4][11]

Naming[edit]

This minor planet was named in memory of eminent Soviet scientist, Mikhail Subbotin (1893–1966), long-time director of the Institute of Theoretical Astronomy (ITA) in former Leningrad, the lunar crater Subbotin was also named in his honour.[2][3] The official naming citation was published before November 1977 (M.P.C. 2740).[14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1692 Subbotina (1936 QD)" (2017-03-29 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 1 July 2017. 
  2. ^ a b c Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1692) Subbotina. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. pp. 134–135. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 15 May 2016. 
  3. ^ a b "Mikhail Fedorovich Subbotin (1893–1966) – Obituary". Soviet Astronomy. 11: 375–376. October 1967. Bibcode:1967SvA....11..375. Retrieved 10 November 2015. 
  4. ^ a b c d e Nugent, C. R.; Mainzer, A.; Masiero, J.; Bauer, J.; Cutri, R. M.; Grav, T.; et al. (December 2015). "NEOWISE Reactivation Mission Year One: Preliminary Asteroid Diameters and Albedos". The Astrophysical Journal. 814 (2): 13. arXiv:1509.02522Freely accessible. Bibcode:2015ApJ...814..117N. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/814/2/117. Retrieved 20 April 2017. 
  5. ^ a b c d Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Hand, E.; Bauer, J.; Tholen, D.; et al. (November 2011). "NEOWISE Studies of Spectrophotometrically Classified Asteroids: Preliminary Results". The Astrophysical Journal. 741 (2): 25. arXiv:1109.6407Freely accessible. Bibcode:2011ApJ...741...90M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/741/2/90. Retrieved 15 May 2016. 
  6. ^ a b Masiero, Joseph R.; Mainzer, A. K.; Grav, T.; Bauer, J. M.; Cutri, R. M.; Dailey, J.; et al. (November 2011). "Main Belt Asteroids with WISE/NEOWISE. I. Preliminary Albedos and Diameters". The Astrophysical Journal. 741 (2): 20. arXiv:1109.4096Freely accessible. Bibcode:2011ApJ...741...68M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/741/2/68. Retrieved 8 December 2016. 
  7. ^ a b c d e "LCDB Data for (1692) Subbotina". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 15 May 2016. 
  8. ^ a b c d Tedesco, E. F.; Noah, P. V.; Noah, M.; Price, S. D. (October 2004). "IRAS Minor Planet Survey V6.0". NASA Planetary Data System. Bibcode:2004PDSS...12.....T. Retrieved 15 May 2016. 
  9. ^ a b c d Usui, Fumihiko; Kuroda, Daisuke; Müller, Thomas G.; Hasegawa, Sunao; Ishiguro, Masateru; Ootsubo, Takafumi; et al. (October 2011). "Asteroid Catalog Using Akari: AKARI/IRC Mid-Infrared Asteroid Survey". Publications of the Astronomical Society of Japan. 63 (5): 1117–1138. Bibcode:2011PASJ...63.1117U. doi:10.1093/pasj/63.5.1117. Retrieved 15 May 2016. 
  10. ^ a b c d Masiero, Joseph R.; Mainzer, A. K.; Grav, T.; Bauer, J. M.; Cutri, R. M.; Nugent, C.; et al. (November 2012). "Preliminary Analysis of WISE/NEOWISE 3-Band Cryogenic and Post-cryogenic Observations of Main Belt Asteroids". The Astrophysical Journal Letters. 759 (1): 5. arXiv:1209.5794Freely accessible. Bibcode:2012ApJ...759L...8M. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/759/1/L8. Retrieved 15 May 2016. 
  11. ^ a b c d e Nugent, C. R.; Mainzer, A.; Bauer, J.; Cutri, R. M.; Kramer, E. A.; Grav, T.; et al. (September 2016). "NEOWISE Reactivation Mission Year Two: Asteroid Diameters and Albedos". The Astronomical Journal. 152 (3): 12. arXiv:1606.08923Freely accessible. Bibcode:2016AJ....152...63N. doi:10.3847/0004-6256/152/3/63. Retrieved 20 April 2017. 
  12. ^ a b Behrend, Raoul. "Asteroids and comets rotation curves – (1692) Subbotina". Geneva Observatory. Retrieved 15 May 2016. 
  13. ^ a b "1692 Subbotina (1936 QD)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 15 May 2016. 
  14. ^ "MPC/MPO/MPS Archive". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 15 May 2016. 

External links[edit]