1711 Sandrine

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1711 Sandrine
Discovery [1]
Discovered by E. Delporte
Discovery site Uccle Obs.
Discovery date 29 January 1935
Designations
MPC designation (1711) Sandrine
Named after
(grand-nice of astronomer)
Georges Roland[2]
1935 BB · 1938 SF1
1943 QE · 1949 WF
1951 CX1 · 1952 HG1
1956 AH · 1956 AW
1956 DC · 1959 TR
1959 UH · A909 DJ
main-belt · (outer)
Eos[3]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 107.82 yr (39,380 days)
Aphelion 3.3596 AU
Perihelion 2.6666 AU
3.0131 AU
Eccentricity 0.1150
5.23 yr (1,910 days)
5.6639°
0° 11m 18.24s / day
Inclination 11.095°
134.78°
251.25°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 22.929±0.364 km[4]
0.133±0.011[4]
Tholen = S[1]
B–V = 0.855[1]
U–B = 0.447[1]
11.01[1]

1711 Sandrine, provisional designation 1935 BB, is a stony Eoan asteroid from the outer region of the asteroid belt, approximately 23 kilometers in diameter.

This asteroid was discovered on 29 January 1935, by Belgian astronomer Eugène Delporte at the Royal Observatory of Belgium in Uccle,[5] it was named after the grand-nice of astronomer Georges Roland.[2]

Classification and orbit[edit]

Sandrine is a member of the Eos family (606), the largest asteroid family in the outer main belt consisting of nearly 10,000 asteroids.[3][6]:23 It orbits the Sun in the outer main-belt at a distance of 2.7–3.4 AU once every 5 years and 3 months (1,910 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.12 and an inclination of 11° with respect to the ecliptic.[1] The body's observation arc begins with its official discovery observation, its first observation at Heidelberg in 1909, when it was identified as A909 DJ, has been discarded.[5]

Physical characteristics[edit]

In the Tholen classification, Sandrine is characterized as a common S-type asteroid.[1]

Diameter and albedo[edit]

According to the survey carried out by NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer with its subsequent NEOWISE mission, Sandrine measures 22.93 kilometers in diameter, and its surface has an albedo of 0.133.[4] It has an absolute magnitude of 11.01.[1]

Lightcurves[edit]

As of 2017, Sandrine's rotation period and shape remain unknown.[1]

Naming[edit]

This minor planet was named after Sandrine, a grand-niece of Georges Roland, astronomer at Uccle and co-discoverer of Comet Arend–Roland. Delporte also named 1707 Chantal and 1848 Delvaux after family members of his collaborator.[2] The official naming citation was published by the Minor Planet Center on 8 April 1982 (M.P.C. 6832).[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1711 Sandrine (1935 BB)" (2016-12-13 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 7 June 2017. 
  2. ^ a b c Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1711) Sandrine. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 136. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 18 December 2016. 
  3. ^ a b "Small Bodies Data Ferret". Nesvorny HCM Asteroid Families V3.0. Retrieved 21 November 2017. 
  4. ^ a b c Masiero, Joseph R.; Grav, T.; Mainzer, A. K.; Nugent, C. R.; Bauer, J. M.; Stevenson, R.; et al. (August 2014). "Main-belt Asteroids with WISE/NEOWISE: Near-infrared Albedos". The Astrophysical Journal. 791 (2): 11. arXiv:1406.6645Freely accessible. Bibcode:2014ApJ...791..121M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/791/2/121. Retrieved 18 December 2016. 
  5. ^ a b "1711 Sandrine (1935 BB)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 18 December 2016. 
  6. ^ Nesvorný, D.; Broz, M.; Carruba, V. (December 2014). "Identification and Dynamical Properties of Asteroid Families" (PDF). Asteroids IV: 297–321. arXiv:1502.01628Freely accessible. Bibcode:2015aste.book..297N. doi:10.2458/azu_uapress_9780816532131-ch016. Retrieved 21 November 2017. 
  7. ^ "MPC/MPO/MPS Archive". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 18 December 2016. 

External links[edit]