1721 in Scotland

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1721
in
Scotland

Centuries:
Decades:
See also: List of years in Scotland
Timeline of Scottish history
1721 in: Great BritainWalesIrelandElsewhere

Events from the year 1721 in Scotland.

Incumbents[edit]

Law officers[edit]

Judiciary[edit]

Events[edit]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "George I". BBC - History. Retrieved 28 April 2018.
  2. ^ "John Ker, 1st Duke of Roxburghe (c.1680–1741), Soldier and Secretary of State for Scotland (1716–1725)". artuk.org. Retrieved 28 April 2018.
  3. ^ "DUNDAS, Robert (1685-1753), of Arniston, Edinburgh". www.historyofparliamentonline.org. Retrieved 28 April 2018.
  4. ^ "James Murray - British soldier and official". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved 28 April 2018.
  5. ^ Skempton, A. W.; Chrimes, Mike (2002). A Biographical Dictionary of Civil Engineers in Great Britain and Ireland: 1500-1830. Thomas Telford. p. 5. ISBN 9780727729392.
  6. ^ "National Records of Scotland". www.nrscotland.gov.uk. Retrieved 28 April 2018.
  7. ^ "Garden, Francis, Lord Gardenstone (1721–1793), judge". Oxford Index. Oxford University Press. 23 September 2004. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/10349. Retrieved 28 April 2018.
  8. ^ "Douglas, John (1721–1807), bishop of Salisbury and writer". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/9780198614128.001.0001/odnb-9780198614128-e-7908. Retrieved 28 April 2018.
  9. ^ "Biography of William Robertson". universitystory.gla.ac.uk. Retrieved 28 April 2018.
  10. ^ "Skinner, John (1721–1807), songwriter and ecclesiastical historian". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/9780198614128.001.0001/odnb-9780198614128-e-25678. Retrieved 28 April 2018.
  11. ^ "Wilkie, William (1721–1772), Church of Scotland minister and poet". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/9780198614128.001.0001/odnb-9780198614128-e-29414. Retrieved 28 April 2018.
  12. ^ "Elphinston, James (1721–1809), educationist and advocate of spelling reform". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/9780198614128.001.0001/odnb-9780198614128-e-8738. Retrieved 28 April 2018.
  13. ^ "James Grainger". www.royalacademy.org.uk. Retrieved 28 April 2018.