1727 Mette

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
1727 Mette
Discovery [1]
Discovered by A. D. Andrews
Discovery site Boyden Obs.
Discovery date 25 January 1965
Designations
MPC designation (1727) Mette
Named after
Mette Andrews
(wife of discoverer)[2]
1965 BA · 1955 DC
Mars-crosser[1] · Hungaria[3][4]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 61.54 yr (22,477 days)
Aphelion 2.0430 AU
Perihelion 1.6652 AU
1.8541 AU
Eccentricity 0.1019
2.52 yr (922 days)
322.85°
Inclination 22.894°
133.04°
312.94°
Known satellites 1 (see 2nd infobox)[a]
Earth MOID 0.7183 AU
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 5.44±1.09 km[5]
8.97 km (calculated)[4]
2.427 h[b]
2.63 h[6]
2.637 h[7]
3.22 h[8]
2.981±0.001 h[9]
2.98125±0.00004 h[9]
2.981±0.001 h[10]
2.981±0.003 h[11]
2.9814±0.0001 h[9]
2.98109±0.00007 h[12][13]
2.9808±0.0002 h[14]
2.9812±0.0002 h[15]
3.000±0.014 h[16]
0.20 (assumed)[4]
0.544±0.218[5]
Tholen = S[1][4] · S[17][18]
12.6[1][4][5] · 12.69±0.27[17] · 12.70[18]

1727 Mette, provisional designation 1965 BA, is a binary[a] Hungaria asteroid and Mars-crosser from the inner regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 9 kilometers in diameter.

It was discovered on 25 January 1965, by English astronomer David Andrews at Boyden Observatory near Bloemfontein in Free State, South Africa ,[3] it was named after the discoverer's wife Mette Andrews.[2]

Classification and orbit[edit]

The S-type asteroid is a member of the Hungaria family, which form the innermost dense concentration of asteroids in the Solar System, it is also a Mars-crossing asteroid, a dynamically unstable group between the main belt and the near-Earth populations.

It orbits the Sun in the inner main-belt at a distance of 1.7–2.0 AU once every 2 years and 6 months (922 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.10 and an inclination of 23° with respect to the ecliptic.[1] Being a Mars-crosser, Mette will make a relatively close approach to Mars on April 15, 2023, when it will pass near the Red Planet at a distance of less than 0.08 AU (12,000,000 km).[1] It was first identified as 1955 DC at Goethe Link Observatory in 1955, extending the body's observation arc by 10 years prior to its official discovery observation.[3]

Physical parameters[edit]

A large number of rotational lightcurves of Mette were obtained from photometric observations, they gave a rotation period of approximately 2.981 hours (best rated results) with a brightness variation between 0.22 and 0.38 magnitude, indicating a moderately elongated body (U=3/3/3).[9][10][14][15] The Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link assumes a standard albedo for stony asteroids of 0.20 and calculates a diameter of 8.97 kilometers,[4] while observations with the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer gave a diameter of 5.44 kilometers and an albedo of 0.544.[5]

Naming[edit]

This minor planet was named by the discoverer after his wife, Mette Andrews for her comprehension of his nocturnal working hours and absence from home,[2] the approved naming citation was published by the Minor Planet Center on 1 February 1980 (M.P.C. 5183).[19]

Moon[edit]

S/2013 (1727) 1
Discovery
Discovery date 17 January 2013 [a]
Light-curve
Orbital characteristics
21 km
0.8746±0.0008 days
(20 hours, 59±1 minutes)
31 mas (maximum)
Satellite of 1727 Mette
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 2.14 km [20]
3.4 ± 0.2 fainter than primary[20]
15.7

In 2013, a satellite orbiting the asteroid was discovered. The moon measures about 2 kilometers in diameter and orbits Mette once every 20 hours and 59 minutes.[12][13][20]

There are several hundreds of asteroids known to have satellites (also see Category:Binary asteroids).[21]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams (No.3402), 5 February 2013 for (1727) METTE: "CCD photometric observations made between Jan. 17 and 21 show that minor planet (1727) Mette is a binary system with an orbital period of 21.05 +/- 0.03 hr. The light-curve of the primary has a period of 2.98091 +/- 0.00009 hr with an amplitude of 0.33 +/- 0.01 mag, indicating a moderately elongated body. Assuming a triaxial ellipsoidal shape and equatorial view, this gives an a/b ratio of 1.36 +/- 0.02. This makes the object unusual in that the primaries of most small binary systems are nearly spheroidal, the depth of the events ranges from 0.04 to 0.07 mag. The depth of the secondary event gives a lower limit for the effective secondary-to-primary diameter ratio of Ds/Dp = 0.20 +/- 0.02. A general "bowing" of the secondary period light curve (amplitude 0.01–0.02 mag) indicates that the satellite is probably tidally-locked to the orbital period." — Reported by B. D. Warner, Palmer Divide Observatory, Colorado Springs, CO, USA; R. D. Stephens, Center for Solar System Studies, Landers, CA, USA; and A. W. Harris, MoreData!, La Canada, CA, USA.
  2. ^ Monson (2011) web: rotation period 2.427 hours with a brightness amplitude of 0.29. Summary figures at Asteroid Lightcurve Database for (1727) Mette

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1727 Mette (1965 BA)" (2016-09-07 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 1 July 2017. 
  2. ^ a b c Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1727) Mette. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 137. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 21 December 2016. 
  3. ^ a b c "1727 Mette (1965 BA)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 21 December 2016. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f "LCDB Data for (1727) Mette". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 21 December 2016. 
  5. ^ a b c d Alí-Lagoa, V.; Delbo', M. (July 2017). "Sizes and albedos of Mars-crossing asteroids from WISE/NEOWISE data" (PDF). Astronomy and Astrophysics. 603: 8. arXiv:1705.10263Freely accessible. Bibcode:2017A&A...603A..55A. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201629917. Retrieved 21 October 2017. 
  6. ^ Wisniewski, W. Z.; McMillan, R. S. (May 1987). "Differential CCD photometry of faint asteroids in crowded star fields and nonphotometric sky conditions". Astronomical Journal: 1264–1267. Bibcode:1987AJ.....93.1264W. doi:10.1086/114408. ISSN 0004-6256. Retrieved 21 December 2016. 
  7. ^ Prokof'eva, V. V.; Demchik, M. I.; Golub', A. I. (December 1991). "TV photometry of asteroids: brightness curve of asteroid 1727 Mette". Solar System Research. 26 (4): 373–375. Bibcode:1992SoSyR..26..373P. Retrieved 21 December 2016. 
  8. ^ Sárneczky, K.; Szabó, Gy.; Kiss, L. L. (June 1999). "CCD observations of 11 faint asteroids". Astronomy and Astrophysics Supplement: 363–368. Bibcode:1999A&AS..137..363S. doi:10.1051/aas:1999251. Retrieved 21 December 2016. 
  9. ^ a b c d Behrend, Raoul. "Asteroids and comets rotation curves – (1727) Mette". Geneva Observatory. Retrieved 21 December 2016. 
  10. ^ a b Gandolfi, D.; Cigna, M.; Fulvio, D.; Blanco, C. (January 2009). "CCD and photon-counting photometric observations of asteroids carried out at Padova and Catania observatories". Planetary and Space Science. 57 (1): 1–9. arXiv:0810.1560Freely accessible. Bibcode:2009P&SS...57....1G. doi:10.1016/j.pss.2008.09.014. Retrieved 21 December 2016. 
  11. ^ Warner, Brian D. (October 2011). "Asteroid Lightcurve Analysis at the Palmer Divide Observatory: 2011 March - July". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 38 (4): 190–195. Bibcode:2011MPBu...38..190W. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 21 December 2016. 
  12. ^ a b Warner, B. D.; Stephens, R. D.; Harris, A. W. (February 2013). "(1727) Mette". Central Bureau Electronic Telegrams (3402). Bibcode:2013CBET.3402....1W. Retrieved 21 December 2016. 
  13. ^ a b Warner, Brian D.; Stephens, Robert D. (July 2013). "1727 Mette: A New Hungaria Binary". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 40 (3): 129–130. Bibcode:2013MPBu...40..129W. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 21 December 2016. 
  14. ^ a b Warner, Brian D.; Stephens, Robert D.; Harris, Alan W. (January 2015). "A Trio of Binary Asteroids". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 42 (1): 31–34. Bibcode:2015MPBu...42...31W. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 21 December 2016. 
  15. ^ a b Warner, Brian D. (October 2016). "Asteroid Lightcurve Analysis at CS3-Palmer Divide Station: 2016 April-July". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 43 (4): 300–304. Bibcode:2016MPBu...43..300W. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 21 December 2016. 
  16. ^ Aznar Macias, Amadeo; Carreno Garcerain, Alfonso; Arce Masego, Enrique; Brines Rodriguez, Pedro; Lozano de Haro, Juan; Fornas Silva, Alvaro; et al. (July 2016). "Twenty-one Asteroid Lightcurves at Group Observadores de Asteroides (OBAS): Late 2015 to Early 2016". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 43 (3): 257–263. Bibcode:2016MPBu...43..257A. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 21 December 2016. 
  17. ^ a b Veres, Peter; Jedicke, Robert; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Denneau, Larry; Granvik, Mikael; Bolin, Bryce; et al. (November 2015). "Absolute magnitudes and slope parameters for 250,000 asteroids observed by Pan-STARRS PS1 - Preliminary results". Icarus. 261: 34–47. arXiv:1506.00762Freely accessible. Bibcode:2015Icar..261...34V. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2015.08.007. Retrieved 21 December 2016. 
  18. ^ a b Carry, B.; Solano, E.; Eggl, S.; DeMeo, F. E. (April 2016). "Spectral properties of near-Earth and Mars-crossing asteroids using Sloan photometry". Icarus. 268: 340–354. arXiv:1601.02087Freely accessible. Bibcode:2016Icar..268..340C. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2015.12.047. Retrieved 21 December 2016. 
  19. ^ "MPC/MPO/MPS Archive". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 21 December 2016. 
  20. ^ a b c Johnston, Robert. "(1727) Mette". johnstonsarchive.net. Retrieved 28 May 2015. 
  21. ^ Wm. Robert Johnston (1 November 2015). "Asteroids with Satellites". Johnston's Archive. Retrieved 16 November 2015. 

External links[edit]