173 Ino

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173 Ino
Discovery [1]
Discovered by A. Borrelly
Discovery site Marseille
Discovery date 1 August 1877
Designations
MPC designation (173) Ino
Pronunciation /ˈn/
Named after
Ino[2] (Greek mythology)
A922 SB
main-belt[1][3] · (middle)
Ino[4]
Adjectives Inoan
Orbital characteristics[3]
Epoch 23 March 2018 (JD 2458200.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 138.75 yr (50,678 d)
Aphelion 3.3142 AU
Perihelion 2.1708 AU
2.7425 AU
Eccentricity 0.2085
4.54 yr (1,659 d)
307.27°
0° 13m 1.2s / day
Inclination 14.197°
148.18°
228.89°
Physical characteristics
Mean diameter
118.70±27.07 km[5]
125.821±1.489 km[6]
147.50±41.69 km[7]
154.10±3.5 km[8]
160.61 km[9]
Mass (4.79±3.11)×1018 kg[10]
Mean density
2.23±1.47 g/cm3[10]
5.93 h[11]
6.1±0.2 h[12]
6.106±0.001 h[12]
6.1088±0.0007 h[12]
6.11 h[13]
6.113±0.002 h[14]
6.11651 h[15]
6.15 h[16]
6.163 h[17]
0.059[9]
0.06±0.02[7]
0.0642±0.003[8]
0.07±0.05[5]
0.096±0.018[6]
Tholen = C[3]
SMASS = Xk[3]
B–V = 0.705[3]
U–B = 0.305[3]
7.66[3][6][7][8][9][18]
7.80±0.05[19]
7.90[5][20]

173 Ino (/ˈn/) is a large asteroid and the parent body of the Ino family, located in the central regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 150 kilometers (93 miles) in diameter. It was discovered on 1 August 1877, by French astronomer Alphonse Borrelly at Marseille Observatory in southern France, and named after the queen Ino from Greek mythology.[1][2] The dark Xk-type asteroid has a rotation period of 6.15 hours.[18]

Orbit and classification[edit]

Ino is the parent body and namesake of the Ino family (522),[4] an asteroid family in the intermediate main belt with nearly 500 known members.[21]:23 The adjectival form of the asteroid name is "Inoan".

It orbits the Sun in the central main-belt at a distance of 2.2–3.3 AU once every 4 years and 6 months (1,659 days; semi-major axis of 2.74 AU). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.21 and an inclination of 14° with respect to the ecliptic.[3] The body's observation arc begins at Düsseldorf-Bilk Observatory in January 1879, five months after its official discovery observation at Marseilles.[1]

Physical characteristics[edit]

In the Tholen classification, Ino is a common carbonaceous C-type, while in the SMASS classification it is a Xk-subtype that transitions between the X-type and uncommon K-type asteroids.[3]

Multiple photometric studies of this asteroid were performed between 1978 and 2002. The combined data gave an irregular, asymmetrical light curve with a period of 6.163 ± 0.005 hours and a brightness variation of 0.10–0.15 in magnitude. The asteroid is rotating in a retrograde direction.[15]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "173 Ino". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 18 April 2018. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (173) Ino. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 18 April 2018. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 173 Ino" (2017-10-21 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 18 April 2018. 
  4. ^ a b "Small Bodies Data Ferret". Nesvorny HCM Asteroid Families V3.0. Retrieved 18 April 2018. 
  5. ^ a b c Nugent, C. R.; Mainzer, A.; Bauer, J.; Cutri, R. M.; Kramer, E. A.; Grav, T.; et al. (September 2016). "NEOWISE Reactivation Mission Year Two: Asteroid Diameters and Albedos" (PDF). The Astronomical Journal. 152 (3): 12. arXiv:1606.08923Freely accessible. Bibcode:2016AJ....152...63N. doi:10.3847/0004-6256/152/3/63. Retrieved 18 April 2018. 
  6. ^ a b c Masiero, Joseph R.; Mainzer, A. K.; Grav, T.; Bauer, J. M.; Cutri, R. M.; Nugent, C.; et al. (November 2012). "Preliminary Analysis of WISE/NEOWISE 3-Band Cryogenic and Post-cryogenic Observations of Main Belt Asteroids" (PDF). The Astrophysical Journal Letters. 759 (1): 5. arXiv:1209.5794Freely accessible. Bibcode:2012ApJ...759L...8M. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/759/1/L8. Retrieved 18 April 2018. 
  7. ^ a b c Nugent, C. R.; Mainzer, A.; Masiero, J.; Bauer, J.; Cutri, R. M.; Grav, T.; et al. (December 2015). "NEOWISE Reactivation Mission Year One: Preliminary Asteroid Diameters and Albedos" (PDF). The Astrophysical Journal. 814 (2): 13. arXiv:1509.02522Freely accessible. Bibcode:2015ApJ...814..117N. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/814/2/117. Retrieved 18 April 2018. 
  8. ^ a b c Tedesco, E. F.; Noah, P. V.; Noah, M.; Price, S. D. (October 2004). "IRAS Minor Planet Survey V6.0". NASA Planetary Data System. Bibcode:2004PDSS...12.....T. Retrieved 18 April 2018. 
  9. ^ a b c Usui, Fumihiko; Kuroda, Daisuke; Müller, Thomas G.; Hasegawa, Sunao; Ishiguro, Masateru; Ootsubo, Takafumi; et al. (October 2011). "Asteroid Catalog Using Akari: AKARI/IRC Mid-Infrared Asteroid Survey". Publications of the Astronomical Society of Japan. 63 (5): 1117–1138. Bibcode:2011PASJ...63.1117U. doi:10.1093/pasj/63.5.1117. Retrieved 18 April 2018.  Online catalog
  10. ^ a b Carry, B. (December 2012), "Density of asteroids" (PDF), Planetary and Space Science, 73, pp. 98–118, arXiv:1203.4336Freely accessible, Bibcode:2012P&SS...73...98C, doi:10.1016/j.pss.2012.03.009  See Table 1.
  11. ^ Schober, H. J. (December 1978). "Photometric Variations of the Minor Planets 55 Pandora and 173 Ino during the Opposition in 1977: Light Curves and Rotation Periods". Astronomy and Astrophysics Supplement. Bibcode:1978A&AS...34..377S. Retrieved 18 April 2018. 
  12. ^ a b c Behrend, Raoul. "Asteroids and comets rotation curves – (173) Ino". Geneva Observatory. Retrieved 18 April 2018. 
  13. ^ Erikson, A. (December 1989). "Improvement of Rotation Periods for the Asteroids 12 Victoria, 173 Ino and 1245 Calvinia". Asteroids: 55. Bibcode:1990acm..proc...55E. Retrieved 18 April 2018. 
  14. ^ Gandolfi, D.; Cigna, M.; Fulvio, D.; Blanco, C. (January 2009). "CCD and photon-counting photometric observations of asteroids carried out at Padova and Catania observatories" (PDF). Planetary and Space Science. 57 (1): 1–9. arXiv:0810.1560Freely accessible. Bibcode:2009P&SS...57....1G. doi:10.1016/j.pss.2008.09.014. Retrieved 18 April 2018. 
  15. ^ a b Michalowski, T.; Kaasalainen, M.; Marciniak, A.; Denchev, P.; Kwiatkowski, T.; Kryszczynska, A.; et al. (November 2005). "Photometry and models of selected main belt asteroids. II. 173 Ino, 376 Geometria, and 451 Patientia". Astronomy and Astrophysics. 443 (1): 329–335. Bibcode:2005A&A...443..329M. doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20053656. Retrieved 18 April 2018. 
  16. ^ Debehogne, H.; Lagerkvist, C.-I.; Magnusson, P.; Hahn, G. (December 1989). "Physical studies of asteroids XX - Photoelectric photometry of asteroids". Asteroids: 45. Bibcode:1990acm..proc...45D. Retrieved 18 April 2018. 
  17. ^ Michalowski, Tadeusz (December 1993). "Poles, shapes, senses of rotation, and sidereal periods of asteroids". Icarus: 563. Bibcode:1993Icar..106..563M. doi:10.1006/icar.1993.1193. Retrieved 18 April 2018. 
  18. ^ a b "LCDB Data for (173) Ino". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 18 April 2018. 
  19. ^ Warner, Brian D. (December 2007). "Initial Results of a Dedicated H-G Project". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 34 (4): 113–119. Bibcode:2007MPBu...34..113W. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 18 April 2018. 
  20. ^ Veres, Peter; Jedicke, Robert; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Denneau, Larry; Granvik, Mikael; Bolin, Bryce; et al. (November 2015). "Absolute magnitudes and slope parameters for 250,000 asteroids observed by Pan-STARRS PS1 - Preliminary results" (PDF). Icarus. 261: 34–47. arXiv:1506.00762Freely accessible. Bibcode:2015Icar..261...34V. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2015.08.007. Retrieved 18 April 2018. 
  21. ^ Nesvorný, D.; Broz, M.; Carruba, V. (December 2014). "Identification and Dynamical Properties of Asteroid Families" (PDF). Asteroids IV: 297–321. arXiv:1502.01628Freely accessible. Bibcode:2015aste.book..297N. doi:10.2458/azu_uapress_9780816532131-ch016. Retrieved 18 April 2018. 

External links[edit]