1740

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1740 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar1740
MDCCXL
Ab urbe condita2493
Armenian calendar1189
ԹՎ ՌՃՁԹ
Assyrian calendar6490
Balinese saka calendar1661–1662
Bengali calendar1147
Berber calendar2690
British Regnal year13 Geo. 2 – 14 Geo. 2
Buddhist calendar2284
Burmese calendar1102
Byzantine calendar7248–7249
Chinese calendar己未(Earth Goat)
4436 or 4376
    — to —
庚申年 (Metal Monkey)
4437 or 4377
Coptic calendar1456–1457
Discordian calendar2906
Ethiopian calendar1732–1733
Hebrew calendar5500–5501
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat1796–1797
 - Shaka Samvat1661–1662
 - Kali Yuga4840–4841
Holocene calendar11740
Igbo calendar740–741
Iranian calendar1118–1119
Islamic calendar1152–1153
Japanese calendarGenbun 5
(元文5年)
Javanese calendar1664–1665
Julian calendarGregorian minus 11 days
Korean calendar4073
Minguo calendar172 before ROC
民前172年
Nanakshahi calendar272
Thai solar calendar2282–2283
Tibetan calendar阴土羊年
(female Earth-Goat)
1866 or 1485 or 713
    — to —
阳金猴年
(male Iron-Monkey)
1867 or 1486 or 714

1740 (MDCCXL) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1740th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 740th year of the 2nd millennium, the 40th year of the 18th century, and the 1st year of the 1740s decade. As of the start of 1740, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

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References[edit]

  1. ^ Williams, Hywel (2005). Cassell's Chronology of World History. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson. p. 308. ISBN 0-304-35730-8. 
  2. ^ "image: Bird's eye view of Batavia showing the massacre of the Chinese". Archived from the original on September 21, 2009. Retrieved November 12, 2006. 
  3. ^ Hibbert, Christopher, ed. (1988). The Encyclopædia of Oxford. London: Macmillan. p. 182. ISBN 0-333-39917-X. 
  4. ^  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainStephen, Leslie, ed. (1886). "Bingham, Margaret". Dictionary of National Biography. 5. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 
  5. ^ "The Historical Theater in the Year 400 AD, in Which Both Romans and Barbarians Resided Side by Side in the Eastern Part of the Roman Empire". World Digital Library. 1725. Retrieved 2013-07-27.