17th Attack Squadron

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17th Attack Squadron
Air Combat Command.png
First MQ-9 Reaper taxies at Creech AFB 2007.jpg
Active 1942-1946; 1951-1979; 2002-present
Country  United States
Branch  United States Air Force
Role Attack
Part of Air Combat Command
Garrison/HQ Creech Air Force Base
Engagements Southwest Pacific Theater[1]
Decorations Air Force Meritorious Unit Award
Air Force Outstanding Unit Award
Philippine Presidential Unit Citation[1]
Insignia
17th Attack Squadron emblem (approved 4 January 2008)[1] 17 Attack Sq emblem.png

The 17th Attack Squadron is a squadron of the United States Air Force. It is assigned to the 432d Wing, and stationed at Creech Air Force Base in Indian Springs, Nevada.

Overview[edit]

The 17th conducts intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance operating the flies the MQ-1 Predator and MQ-9 Reaper remotely piloted aircraft.

History[edit]

World War II[edit]

Established as a photo-reconnaissance squadron in mid-1942, trained under Second Air Force in Colorado, equipped with very-long range Lockheed F-5 Lightning reconnaissance aircraft Deployed to the South Pacific Area, assigned to Thirteenth Air Force. Flew hazardous unarmed reconnaissance missions over enemy-held territory in Guadalcanal; New Guinea; Northern Solomon Islands; Bismarck Archipelago; Western Pacific; Leyte; Luzon; Southern Philippines; Central Burma and southeast China. Inactivated in the Philippines, April 1946.

Cold War reconnaissance[edit]

McDonnell RF-101F-56-MC Voodoo 56-0217 at Laon Air Base France, 1959

Reactivated at Shaw Air Force Base, South Carolina in 1951 as a photo-reconnaissance training squadron. Equipped with several reconnaissance aircraft during the 1950s, deploying to NATO in 1959 with the McDonnell RF-101C Voodoo. Operated from France until 1966, moving to RAF Upper Heyford, England. Remained in England until 1970, moved to West Germany and re-equipped with McDonnell RF-4C Phantom II aircraft. Remained at Zweibrücken Air Base until 1979 when inactivated due to budget reductions.

Unmanned vehicle operations[edit]

MQ-1 Predator UAV

The squadron was reactivated at what was then known as Indian Springs Air Force Auxiliary Field (now Creech Air Force Base) on 8 March 2002, flying the MQ-1 Predator.

According to the 2014 documentary film Drone, since 2002 the squadron had been working for the Central Intelligence Agency as "customer", carrying out armed missions in Pakistan.[2]

Lineage[edit]

  • Constituted as the 17th Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron on 14 July 1942
Activated on 23 July 1942
Redesignated 17th Photographic Squadron (Light) on 6 February 1943
Redesignated 17th Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron on 13 November 1943
Inactivated on 19 April 1946
  • Redesignated 17th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron, Photo-Jet on 1 April 1951
Activated on 2 April 1951
Redesignated 17th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron on 1 October 1966
Inactivated 1 January 1979
  • Redesignated 17th Reconnaissance Squadron on 4 March 2002
Activated on 8 March 2002
  • Redesignated 17th Attack Squadron on 15 May 2016[1]

Assignments[edit]

Stations[edit]

Detachment operated from: Munda Airfield, New Georgia, Solomon Islands, c. 13 October 1943 – 31 January 1944, 9 March-1 April 1944
Detachment operated from: Buka Airfield, Bougainville, Solomon Islands, c. 11 December 1943-February 1945
Detachment operated from: Kornasoren (Yebrurro) Airfield, Noemfoor, Schouten Islands, 8–23 October 1944
Detachment operated from: Sansapor Airfield, Netherlands East Indies, 13 October-4 November 1944
Detachment operated from: Dulag Airfield, Leyte, Philippines, 9 February–October 1945
  • Puerto Princesa Airfield, Palawan, Philippines, 11 May 1945 – 19 April 1946
  • Shaw Air Force Base, South Carolina, 2 April 1951 – 10 May 1959
  • Laon-Couvron Air Base, France, 10 May 1959
  • RAF Upper Heyford, England, September 1966
  • Zweibrücken Air Base, Germany, 12 January 1970 – 1 January 1979
  • Indian Springs Air Force Auxiliary Field (later Creech Air Force Base), Nevada, 8 March 2002 – present[1]

Aircraft[edit]


References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Haulman, Daniel (June 23, 2016). "Factsheet 17 Attack Squadron (ACC)". Air Force Historical Research Agency. Retrieved July 23, 2017. 
  2. ^ Chris Woods (14 April 2014). "CIA's Pakistan drone strikes carried out by regular US air force personnel". The Guardian. Retrieved 14 April 2014. 

Bibliography[edit]

 This article incorporates public domain material from the Air Force Historical Research Agency website http://www.afhra.af.mil/.

External links[edit]