1825 Klare

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1825 Klare
Discovery [1]
Discovered by K. Reinmuth
Discovery site Heidelberg Obs.
Discovery date 31 August 1954
Designations
MPC designation (1825) Klare
Named after
Gerhard Klare (German astronomer)[2]
1954 QH · 1934 CH
1952 DW2 · 1954 SB
1954 SF · 1954 UF1
1969 AV
main-belt · (middle)[3]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 83.12 yr (30,360 days)
Aphelion 2.9839 AU
Perihelion 2.3702 AU
2.6771 AU
Eccentricity 0.1146
4.38 yr (1,600 days)
71.010°
0° 13m 30s / day
Inclination 4.0342°
288.67°
142.57°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 14.69±0.82 km[4]
19.21 km (calculated)[3]
4.7410±0.0001 h[a]
4.74173±0.00007 h[5]
4.7421±0.0001 h[6]
4.74288±0.00005 h[7]
4.742885±0.000001 h[8]
4.7429±0.0003 h[9]
4.7431±0.0001 h[10]
4.744 h[11]
0.10 (assumed)[3]
0.167±0.021[4]
S/C [3]
11.7[1][3] · 11.80[4] · 11.91±0.24[12]

1825 Klare, provisional designation 1954 QH, is an asteroid from the central region of the asteroid belt, approximately 15 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 31 August 1954, by German astronomer Karl Reinmuth at Heidelberg Observatory in southern Germany,[13] the asteroid was named after Heidelberg astronomer Gerhard Klare.[2]

Orbit and classification[edit]

The presumably stony asteroid orbits the Sun in the central main-belt at a distance of 2.4–3.0 AU once every 4 years and 5 months (1,600 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.11 and an inclination of 4° with respect to the ecliptic.[1] First identified as 1934 CH at Uccle Observatory in 1934, Klare's observation arc begins 20 years prior to its official discovery observation.[13]

Physical characteristics[edit]

Rotation period[edit]

Klare has been the subject of multiple photometric lightcurve studies, which gave a well-determined rotation period between 4.741 and 4.744 hours with a brightness variation between 0.70 and 0.90 magnitude (U=3/n.a.).[5][7][8][9][10][11] Measurements have also been used as the basis for generating a three-dimensional model of its shape,[6] the Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link (CALL) adopts a period 4.744 hours with an amplitude of 0.70 magnitude (U=3).[3]

Diameter and albedo[edit]

According to the survey carried out by the Japanese Akari satellite, Klare measures 14.69 kilometers in diameter, and its surface has an albedo of 0.167,[4] while CALL assumes an albedo of 0.10 – a compromise value for asteroids with a semi-major axis between 2.6 and 2.7 AU, for which neither a S (0.20) nor a C (0.057) type has been determined – and calculates a diameter of 19.21 kilometers with an absolute magnitude of 11.7.[3]

Naming[edit]

Klare was named after Gerhard Klare (born 1932), an observing astronomer at Heidelberg Observatory since 1960, whose fields of interest include minor planets.[2] He is also known for his numerous contributions in the yearbook series "Reviews in Modern Astronomy" of the Astronomische Gesellschaft, the official naming citation was published by the Minor Planet Center before November 1977 (M.P.C. 4156).[14]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Hamanowa 2011, web publication, summary figures given in the Light Curve Data Base – (1825) Klare

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1825 Klare (1954 QH)" (2017-03-29 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 8 June 2017. 
  2. ^ a b c Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1825) Klare. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 146. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g "LCDB Data for (1825) Klare". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  4. ^ a b c d Usui, Fumihiko; Kuroda, Daisuke; Müller, Thomas G.; Hasegawa, Sunao; Ishiguro, Masateru; Ootsubo, Takafumi; et al. (October 2011). "Asteroid Catalog Using Akari: AKARI/IRC Mid-Infrared Asteroid Survey". Publications of the Astronomical Society of Japan. 63 (5): 1117–1138. Bibcode:2011PASJ...63.1117U. doi:10.1093/pasj/63.5.1117. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  5. ^ a b Behrend, Raoul. "Asteroids and comets rotation curves – (1825) Klare". Geneva Observatory. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  6. ^ a b Krueng, Mahfuz; Clark, Maurice (April 2014). "Shaping a 3-D Model of Asteroid 1825 Klare". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 41 (2): 86–89. Bibcode:2014MPBu...41...86K. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  7. ^ a b Hanus, J.; Durech, J.; Oszkiewicz, D. A.; Behrend, R.; Carry, B.; Delbo, M.; et al. (February 2016). "New and updated convex shape models of asteroids based on optical data from a large collaboration network" (PDF). Astronomy and Astrophysics. 586: 24. arXiv:1510.07422Freely accessible. Bibcode:2016A&A...586A.108H. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201527441. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  8. ^ a b Durech, J.; Hanus, J.; Oszkiewicz, D.; Vanco, R. (March 2016). "Asteroid models from the Lowell photometric database". Astronomy and Astrophysics. 587: 6. arXiv:1601.02909Freely accessible. Bibcode:2016A&A...587A..48D. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201527573. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  9. ^ a b Clark, Maurice (September 2006). "Lightcurve results for 383 Janina, 899 Jokaste, 1825 Klare, 2525 O'Steen 5064 Tanchozuru, and (17939) 1999 HH8". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 33 (3): 53–56. Bibcode:2006MPBu...33...53C. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  10. ^ a b Galad, Adrian (September 2008). "Part of Simple Lightcurves from Modra (October 2007- February 2008)". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 35 (3): 128–132. Bibcode:2008MPBu...35..128G. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  11. ^ a b Pray, Donald P. (June 2004). "Lightcurve analysis of asteroids 110, 196, 776, 804, and 1825". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 31 (2): 34–36. Bibcode:2004MPBu...31...34P. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  12. ^ Veres, Peter; Jedicke, Robert; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Denneau, Larry; Granvik, Mikael; Bolin, Bryce; et al. (November 2015). "Absolute magnitudes and slope parameters for 250,000 asteroids observed by Pan-STARRS PS1 - Preliminary results". Icarus. 261: 34–47. arXiv:1506.00762Freely accessible. Bibcode:2015Icar..261...34V. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2015.08.007. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  13. ^ a b "1825 Klare (1954 QH)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 
  14. ^ "MPC/MPO/MPS Archive". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 15 December 2016. 

External links[edit]