1830 Pogson

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1830 Pogson
Discovery [1]
Discovered by P. Wild
Discovery site Zimmerwald Obs.
Discovery date 17 April 1968
Designations
MPC designation (1830) Pogson
Named after
Norman Pogson
(English astronomer)[2]
1968 HA · 1926 GW
1929 EE · 1942 EC1
1945 BB · 1953 RE1
1955 FX · 1955 GE
1961 AC · 1969 QM
1971 BJ · 1972 NA1
1972 OC · 1972 OD
main-belt
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 91.14 yr (33,290 days)
Aphelion 2.3118 AU
Perihelion 2.0643 AU
2.1880 AU
Eccentricity 0.0565
3.24 yr (1,182 days)
160.07°
0° 18m 16.2s / day
Inclination 3.9542°
147.46°
335.17°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 7.710±0.669[3]
2.56999 h (0.107083 d)
0.274±0.059[3]
S (Tholen) · S (SMASS)[1]
B–V = 0.910[1]
U–B = 0.500[1]
12.45[1]

1830 Pogson, provisional designation 1968 HA, is a stony asteroid from the inner regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 7 kilometers in diameter.

The asteroid was discovered on 17 April 1968, by Swiss astronomer Paul Wild at Zimmerwald Observatory near Bern, Switzerland, the S-type asteroid orbits the Sun in the inner main-belt at a distance of 2.1–2.3 AU once every 3 years and 3 months (1,182 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.06 and an inclination of 4° with respect to the ecliptic.of 2.1–2.3 AU every 3 years and 3 months. It had been assigned a large number of provisional designations dating back as far as 1926.[1]

This minor planet was named after the English astronomer Norman Pogson (1829–1891), inventor of the modern astronomical magnitude scale and discoverer of eight minor planets, including 42 Isis and 67 Asia.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1830 Pogson (1968 HA)" (2017-06-05 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 14 June 2017. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1830) Pogson. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 147. ISBN 978-3-540-29925-7. Retrieved 22 August 2016. 
  3. ^ a b Masiero, Joseph R.; Grav, T.; Mainzer, A. K.; Nugent, C. R.; Bauer, J. M.; Stevenson, R.; et al. (August 2014). "Main-belt Asteroids with WISE/NEOWISE: Near-infrared Albedos". The Astrophysical Journal. 791 (2): 11. arXiv:1406.6645Freely accessible. Bibcode:2014ApJ...791..121M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/791/2/121. Retrieved 14 June 2017. 

External links[edit]