1863 Antinous

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1863 Antinous
Discovery [1]
Discovered by C. A. Wirtanen
Discovery site Lick Obs.
Discovery date 7 March 1948
Designations
MPC designation (1863) Antinous
Named after
Antinous (Greek mythology)[2]
1948 EA
Apollo · NEO[1][3]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 68.91 yr (25,168 days)
Aphelion 3.6293 AU
Perihelion 0.8895 AU
2.2594 AU
Eccentricity 0.6063
3.40 yr (1,240 days)
139.55°
0° 17m 24.72s / day
Inclination 18.398°
346.48°
268.00°
Earth MOID 0.1836 AU · 71.5 LD
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 1.80 km (derived)[4]
2.1 km (Gehrels)[1]
3.16 km[5]
3.23 km[6]
4.02 h[7]
4.386±0.004 h[8]
7.453±0.005 h[9]
7.4568±0.0017 h[a]
7.471±0.005 h[b]
0.10[6]
0.11±0.08[10]
0.24 (Gehrels)[1]
0.29 (derived)[4]
SU (Tholen) · Sq (SMASS)[1]
L[11] · SU [4]
B–V = 0.763[1]
U–B = 0.359[1]
15.00[11] · 15.14±0.03 (R)[a] · 15.5[6] · 15.54[1] · 15.62[7] · 15.639±0.058[4][12] · 15.69±0.14[8]

1863 Antinous, provisional designation 1948 EA, is a stony asteroid and near-Earth object, approximately 2–3 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 7 March 1948, by American astronomer Carl Wirtanen at Lick Observatory on the summit of Mount Hamilton, California.[3] It was named after Antinous from Greek mythology.[2]

Orbit and classification[edit]

Antinous is also classified as a Mars-crosser and Apollo asteroid. The SU/Sq-type asteroid orbits the Sun in the inner main-belt at a distance of 0.9–3.6 AU once every 3 years and 5 months (1,240 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.61 and an inclination of 18° with respect to the ecliptic.[1]

It has an Earth Minimum orbit intersection distance (MOID) of 0.1836 AU. In the 20th century Antinous passed within 30 Gm of the Earth five times; it will do so only once in the 21st. The nearest distance increases each time, from 26 to 29 Gm.[citation needed]

Physical characteristics[edit]

In the Tholen and SMASS taxonomic scheme, Antinous is characterized as a SU and Sq type, respectively, which are subtypes of the broader group of S-type asteroids.[1] The Apollo asteroid has a rotation period of 7.46 hours and an albedo between 0.10 and 0.240,[1][5][6][10]

Naming[edit]

This minor planet was named after Antinous from Greek mythology. Antinous was one of the many unwelcome suitors for Penelope's hand while her husband, Odysseus, was away on his travels (also see 201 Penelope and 1143 Odysseus). Antinous, being the most insolent of all, was the first to be killed by Odysseus on his return.[2] The official naming citation was published by the Minor Planet Center before November 1977 (M.P.C. 3935).[13]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Pravec (1999) web: rotation period 7.4568±0.0017 hours with a brightness amplitude of 0.23 mag, and quality code: n.a.. Summary figures at Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link (CALL) for (1863) Antinous
  2. ^ Warner (2016) web: rotation period 7.471±0.005 hours with a brightness amplitude of 0.33 mag, and quality code: 3. Summary figures at Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link (CALL) for (1863) Antinous

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1863 Antinous (1948 EA)" (2017-01-30 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 9 June 2017. 
  2. ^ a b c Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1863) Antinous. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 149. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  3. ^ a b "1863 Antinous (1948 EA)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  4. ^ a b c d "LCDB Data for (1863) Antinous". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  5. ^ a b Harris, A. W.; Mommert, M.; Hora, J. L.; Mueller, M.; Trilling, D. E.; Bhattacharya, B.; et al. (March 2011). "ExploreNEOs. II. The Accuracy of the Warm Spitzer Near-Earth Object Survey". The Astronomical Journal. 141 (3): 10. Bibcode:2011AJ....141...75H. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/141/3/75. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  6. ^ a b c d Trilling, D. E.; Mueller, M.; Hora, J. L.; Harris, A. W.; Bhattacharya, B.; Bottke, W. F.; et al. (September 2010). "ExploreNEOs. I. Description and First Results from the Warm Spitzer Near-Earth Object Survey". The Astronomical Journal. 140 (3): 770–784. Bibcode:2010AJ....140..770T. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/140/3/770. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  7. ^ a b Binzel, R. P. (October 1987). "A photoelectric survey of 130 asteroids". Icarus: 135–208. Bibcode:1987Icar...72..135B. doi:10.1016/0019-1035(87)90125-4. ISSN 0019-1035. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  8. ^ a b Harris, A. W.; Young, J. W.; Bowell, E.; Tholen, D. J. (November 1999). "Asteroid Lightcurve Observations from 1981 to 1983". Icarus. 142 (1). Bibcode:1999Icar..142..173H. doi:10.1006/icar.1999.6181. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  9. ^ Warner, Brian D. (July 2016). "Near-Earth Asteorid Lightcurve Analysis at CS3-Palmer Divide Station: 2016 January-April". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 43 (3): 240–250. Bibcode:2016MPBu...43..240W. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  10. ^ a b Thomas, C. A.; Trilling, D. E.; Emery, J. P.; Mueller, M.; Hora, J. L.; Benner, L. A. M.; et al. (September 2011). "ExploreNEOs. V. Average Albedo by Taxonomic Complex in the Near-Earth Asteroid Population". The Astronomical Journal. 142 (3): 12. Bibcode:2011AJ....142...85T. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/142/3/85. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  11. ^ a b Carry, B.; Solano, E.; Eggl, S.; DeMeo, F. E. (April 2016). "Spectral properties of near-Earth and Mars-crossing asteroids using Sloan photometry". Icarus. 268: 340–354. arXiv:1601.02087Freely accessible. Bibcode:2016Icar..268..340C. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2015.12.047. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  12. ^ Pravec, Petr; Harris, Alan W.; Kusnirák, Peter; Galád, Adrián; Hornoch, Kamil (September 2012). "Absolute magnitudes of asteroids and a revision of asteroid albedo estimates from WISE thermal observations". Icarus. 221 (1): 365–387. Bibcode:2012Icar..221..365P. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2012.07.026. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  13. ^ "MPC/MPO/MPS Archive". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 

External links[edit]