1872 in sports

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Years in sports: 1869 1870 1871 1872 1873 1874 1875
Centuries: 18th century · 19th century · 20th century
Decades: 1840s 1850s 1860s 1870s 1880s 1890s 1900s
Years: 1869 1870 1871 1872 1873 1874 1875

1872 in sports describes the year's events in world sport.

American football[edit]

College championship

Events

Association football[edit]

International

England

  • 16 March — inaugural FA Cup final. The Wanderers 1–0 Royal Engineers at Kennington Oval in London. The goal is scored by Morton Betts. In its way, this first final marks the beginning of major competitive football.
  • The FA rules that the ball must have a circumference of between 68 cm and 71 cm. It must be spherical and must consist of an India rubber bladder enclosed within a casing made of leather or another approved material. Also, the ball must weigh at least 396 grams but no more than 453 grams. The prescribed weight is interesting because leather balls will become notorious for gaining weight when wet: the weight can almost double if the ball gets really soaked.[1]

Scotland

  • February — Rangers F.C. is formed in Glasgow by four friends. The team's first pitch is on common land at Flesher's Haugh, Glasgow Green.

Baseball[edit]

National championship

Events

Boxing[edit]

Events

  • No fights of note take place in 1872. American Champion Mike McCoole and his challengers are inactive.[2]

Cricket[edit]

Events

  • An experiment takes place at Lord's to study the effects of covering the pitch before the start of a match, the first time this is known to have been tried.[3]

England

Golf[edit]

Major tournaments

Horse racing[edit]

England

Australia

Canada

Ireland

USA

Rowing[edit]

The Boat Race

Rugby football[edit]

Events

References[edit]

  1. ^ Among the many stories told about Bill Shankly is one concerning the introduction of plastic balls in the 1960s. Someone remarked to Shankly that so–and–so was a master of the "banana shot" and could bend the ball through the air. Shankly replied: "Huh! I'd like to see him try bending one of those soggy wet leather things we used to play with. It'd break his bloody ankle!"
  2. ^ Cyber Boxing Zone – Mike McCoole. Retrieved on 8 November 2009.
  3. ^ Bowen, p.284.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Rowland Bowen, Cricket: A History of its Growth and Development, Eyre & Spottiswoode, 1970