1876 in South Africa

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1876
in
South Africa

Decades:
See also:

The following lists events that happened during 1876 in South Africa.

Incumbents[edit]

Events[edit]

January
February
  • 5 – The ship Memento sinks off East London and two 2nd Class 2-6-2TT locomotives intended for the Eastern System of the Cape Government Railways are lost.[1]
March
June
July
October
  • 19 – The 2,700 ton steamer Windsor Castle sinks off Dassen Island.
Unknown date

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

Railways[edit]

New lines[edit]

Railway lines opened[edit]

  • 1 January – Namaqualand – Kookfontein to O'okiep, 32 miles (51.5 kilometres).[7]
  • 1 April – Cape Midland – Addo to Sand Flats, 22 miles 30 chains (36.0 kilometres).[8]
  • 16 June – Cape Western – Ceres Road to Worcester, 24 miles 38 chains (39.4 kilometres).[8]
  • 14 September – Cape Western – Bellville to Muldersvlei, 13 miles 37 chains (21.7 kilometres).[8]
  • 18 December – Cape Eastern – East London to Breidbach, 38 miles 73 chains (62.6 kilometres).[8]

Locomotives[edit]

Cape

Six new locomotive types enter service on the Cape Government Railways (CGR):

Natal

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e C.G.R. Numbering Revised, Article by Dave Littley, SA Rail May–June 1993, pp. 94-95.
  2. ^ encyclopedia.org/South_Africa
  3. ^ http://www.westerncape.gov.za/your_gov/108#searching
  4. ^ Lewis, Charles; Pivnic, Les. "Soul of A Railway". System 1, Part 3: Wellington to Touws River, pp. 31–32.  (Retrieved on 3 September 2016)
  5. ^ a b The South African Railways - Historical Survey. Editor George Hart, Publisher Bill Hart, Sponsored by Dorbyl Ltd., Published c. 1978.
  6. ^ Statement Showing, in Chronological Order, the Date of Opening and the Mileage of Each Section of Railway, Statement No. 19, p. 181, ref. no. 200954-13
  7. ^ Bagshawe, Peter (2012). Locomotives of the Namaqualand Railway and Copper Mines (1st ed.). Stenvalls. ISBN 978-91-7266-179-0. 
  8. ^ a b c d Report for year ending 31 December 1909, Cape Government Railways, Section VIII - Dates of Opening and the Length of the different Sections in the Cape Colony, from the Year 1873 to 31st December, 1909.
  9. ^ a b c d Holland, D.F. (1971). Steam Locomotives of the South African Railways. 1: 1859–1910 (1st ed.). Newton Abbott, Devon: David & Charles. ISBN 978-0-7153-5382-0. 
  10. ^ Dulez, Jean A. (2012). Railways of Southern Africa 150 Years (Commemorating One Hundred and Fifty Years of Railways on the Sub-Continent – Complete Motive Power Classifications and Famous Trains – 1860–2011) (1st ed.). Garden View, Johannesburg, South Africa: Vidrail Productions. p. 36. ISBN 9 780620 512282. 
  11. ^ a b c Holland, D. F. (1972). Steam Locomotives of the South African Railways. 2: 1910-1955 (1st ed.). Newton Abbott, Devon: David & Charles. ISBN 978-0-7153-5427-8. 
  12. ^ Dulez, Jean A. (2012). Railways of Southern Africa 150 Years (Commemorating One Hundred and Fifty Years of Railways on the Sub-Continent – Complete Motive Power Classifications and Famous Trains – 1860–2011) (1st ed.). Garden View, Johannesburg, South Africa: Vidrail Productions. pp. 21–22. ISBN 9 780620 512282. 
  13. ^ Abbott, Rowland A.S. (1970). The Fairlie Locomotive, (1st ed.). South Devon House, Newton Abbot, Devon: David & Charles, Newton Abbot. pp. 34, 36-38. ISBN 0 7153 4902 3.
  14. ^ What were these, 2-6-0T or 0-6-0T?