1883 English cricket season

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1883 English cricket season
1882
1884

1883 was the 97th season of cricket in England since the foundation of Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC). There was the first of four successive titles won by Notts, and the beginning of the "Great Revival" of Surrey,[1] who had been among the weaker counties since 1866.

Champion County[a][edit]

Playing record (by county)[2][edit]

County Played Won Lost Drawn
Derbyshire 8 2 5 1
Gloucestershire 12 3 6 3
Hampshire 6 2 3 1
Kent 10 2 6 2
Lancashire 12 6 5 1
Middlesex 10 4 2 4
Nottinghamshire 12 4 1 7
Somerset 6 1 5 0
Surrey 20 10 5 5
Sussex 12 4 7 1
Yorkshire 16 9 2 5

Leading batsmen (qualification 20 innings)[edit]

1883 English season leading batsmen[3]
Name Team Matches Innings Not outs Runs Highest score Average 100s 50s
Walter Read Surrey 22 39 6 1573 168 47.66 2 13
CT Studd Middlesex
MCC
20 34 5 1193 175 not out 41.13 2 4
WG Grace Gloucestershire
MCC
22 41 2 1352 112 34.66 1 9
Louis Hall Yorkshire 26 44 9 1180 127 33.73 2 3
Bunny Lucas Middlesex
MCC
12 23 3 664 97 33.23 0 4

Leading bowlers (qualification 1,000 balls)[edit]

1883 English season leading bowlers[4]
Name Team Balls bowled Runs conceded Wickets taken Average Best bowling 5 wickets
in innings
10 wickets
in match
Alec Watson Lancashire 3762 1135 96 11.82 7/36 9 2
Alfred Shaw Nottinghamshire 4247 840 67 12.53 7/22 7 0
John Crossland Lancashire 2191 934 72 12.97 8/57 6 0
George Harrison Yorkshire 3143 1326 100 13.26 7/43 6 1
George Robinson Oxford University 1015 471 35 13.45 6/38 2 0

Notable Events[edit]

  • 30 January – England won the deciding match of the scheduled three-Test series in Melbourne (although an additional match was arranged later). Some ladies burned the bails and placed the resultant ashes in a small urn. This was presented to England’s captain, Ivo Bligh, who had promised to "recover those ashes". The urn is kept in a glass case at Lord’s but England and Australia have been playing for the Ashes ever since.
  • 25 May – Surrey, in a season that marked their revival from a lowly position since 1866 to the champion eleven of the late 1880s and early 1890s, break the record highest team total in county cricket by scoring 650 against Hampshire.[5]
  • George Harrison became the first bowler to take 100 wickets in the season in which he made his debut in first-class cricket.[6]
  • George Ulyett scored 1,562 runs with a highest score of 84. Not until Charles Harris in 1935 did a player scoring no centuries score more runs in a season.
    • Ulyett’s feat of getting within eleven runs of the leading scorer with no centuries has been approached since only by David Green in 1965.[7][8]

Notes[edit]

a An unofficial seasonal title sometimes proclaimed by consensus of media and historians prior to December 1889 when the official County Championship was constituted. Although there are ante-dated claims prior to 1873, when residence qualifications were introduced, it is only since that ruling that any quasi-official status can be ascribed.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pardon, Sydney H. (editor); John Wisden's Cricketers' Almanack; Forty-Seventh Edition (1905), pp. 173-174
  2. ^ Wynne-Thomas, Peter; The Rigby A-Z of Cricket Records; p. 54 ISBN 072701868X
  3. ^ First Class Batting in England in 1883
  4. ^ First Class Bowling in England in 1883
  5. ^ Webber, Roy; The Playfair Book of Cricket Records; p. 18. Published 1951 by Playfair Books.
  6. ^ Webber; The Playfair Book of Cricket Records; pp. 176-177
  7. ^ First Class Batting in England in 1883 (by Runs)
  8. ^ First Class Batting in England in 1965 (by Runs)

Annual reviews[edit]

  • John Lillywhite's Cricketer's Companion (Green Lilly), Lillywhite, 1884
  • James Lillywhite's Cricketers' Annual (Red Lilly), Lillywhite, 1884
  • John Wisden's Cricketers' Almanack, 1884

External links[edit]