1894 Maryland Aggies football team

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1894 Maryland Aggies football
Conference Maryland Intercollegiate Football Association
1894 record 4–3 (2–2 MIFA)
Head coach J. G. Bannon
Captain Barnes Compton
Seasons
← 1893
1896 →
1894 Maryland Intercollegiate Football Association standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
Maryland 2 2 0     4 3 0
  • $ – Conference champion

The 1894 Maryland Aggies football team represented the Maryland Agricultural College (now the University of Maryland) in the 1894 college football season. Maryland participated as a member of the Maryland Intercollegiate Football Association,[disputed ] which was formed as a result of a disagreement the previous season over whether Maryland or St. John's College deserved the state championship.[1] The Aggies finished the season with a 4–3 record.[2]

The following year, the football program was temporarily disbanded until the 1896 season.

Schedule[edit]

Date Time Opponent Site Result
October 10 Orient Athletic Club* College Park, Maryland W 30–0  
October 12 Western Maryland College Park, Maryland W 52–0  
October 20 at Washington College Chestertown, Maryland W 12–0  
October 27 at St. John's College Annapolis, Maryland L 22–6  
November 7 Georgetown* College Park, Maryland W 6–4  
November 21 at Columbia Athletic Club* Washington, D.C. L 26–0  
November 29 Mount St. Mary's Emmitsburg, Maryland L 24–0  
All times are in Eastern Time.

Players[edit]

The letterwinners on the 1894 team were:[3]

  • J. G. Bannon, end and player-coach: (May 1, 1874 – January 19, 1937) graduated with a B.S. through the Scientific Course in 1895.[4] He was the son of Maryland State Senator Michael Bannon.[5]
  • Wade Blackistone, end
  • Clifton E. Fuller, halfback/quarterback: (May 1, 1873 – September 3, 1958)[6] a native of Cumberland, Maryland, he graduated in 1896.[7] Fuller worked for many years as a freight agent for the Railway Express Agency in Cumberland and served one term as a city councilman.[6][8][9] He attended every Maryland homecoming game in College Park between 1932 and 1957,[9][10] he was a member of the Knights of the Golden Eagle.[11]
  • Samuel "Pop" Harding, tackle/guard: (January 19, 1873 – May 19, 1919) born in Highland, Maryland, he graduated with a B.S. through the Scientific Course in 1895. Harding worked for the Water Department in Washington, D.C., first as a skilled laborer and eventually working his way to the position of foreman.[12]
  • George Harris, quarterback
  • Roland L. Harrison, halfback: born May 4, 1875, in Charlotte Hall, Maryland, he graduated with a B.S. through the Scientific Course in 1895. Harrison worked as a topographer for the U.S. Geological Survey.[12]
  • Harry H. Heward, tackle: born in Crisfield, Maryland, he attended Snow Hill High School and earned a B.S. through the Scientific Course in 1897. In September 1899, he began work as a wholesale oyster dealer in Philadelphia, he married Mary C. née Weamer on January 18, 1905.[13]
  • Grenville Lewis, fullback: (November 12, 1875 – September 1964) born in Washington, D.C., he graduated with a B.S. through the Scientific Course in 1897.[13] He attended Columbian University Law School, where he also coached and played on the football team,[14] he worked in Honduras as a cattle rancher until 1900, and then as an engineer for several mining companies.[15]
  • Clarence S. Mullikin, end: born on January 7, 1875, in Prince George's County, Maryland, he graduated with a B.S. through the Scientific Course in 1895. He worked as a teacher in Prince George's County public schools until 1898, when he became a farmer and entered politics, he was appointed to a post in the Census Bureau responsible for the Fifth Congressional District of Maryland. He resigned in 1900 to enter a seminary in Virginia; in 1903, he traveled to Alaska as a missionary, and in 1907, moved to Brookfield, Connecticut. He married Annah H. née Davenport on September 30, 1903, and the couple had three children.[16]
  • Clarence N. Walker, center: born on May 2, 1876, in Branchville, Maryland, he graduated with a B.S. through the Scientific Course in 1896. He earned an A.B. from the National Law University in 1900, and an LL.M. in 1901. Walker worked as a patent solicitor in Washington, D.C., and in 1902, he married Rose née Evans with whom he had two children.[17]
  • Thomas R. Wharton, guard: born on June 10, 1876, in Stockton, Maryland, he attended Stockton High School. Wharton left Maryland Agricultural College before graduation to enter business as a merchant, he married Mary H. née Purnell on November 12, 1903, and the couple had one child.[18]
  • Arthur Wooters, guard

Non-letterwinners:[19]

  • William T. L. "Sherman" Rollins, halfback: he graduated with a B.S. through the Scientific Course in 1896 and worked as a supervisor of the census and inspector for the Post Office in Seat Pleasant, Maryland.[17]
  • R. B. "Bob" Beale, tackle: born on February 12, 1878, in Washington, D.C., he graduated with a B.S. through the Scientific Course in 1896. Beale attended Johns Hopkins University, where he earned a certificate of proficiency in electricity in 1899, he worked for the General Electric Company in Schenectady, New York. He married Katharine née Summerhages in February 1905.[20]
  • John J. Timanus, tackle: he graduated with a B.S. through the Scientific Course in 1895 and worked as an attorney-at-law in Towson, Maryland.[21]
  • Barnes Compton, end and captain: son of a wealthy Maryland plantation owner, he graduated in 1895 with a B.S. in the Scientific Course[4] and became a clerk of the B&O Railroad.[22] Compton died sometime before 1914.[4]
  • Pete Duffy, halfback
  • Ernest Millison, halfback

Manager:

  • George Harris

References[edit]

  1. ^ David Ungrady, Tales from the Maryland Terrapins, 2003, pp. 4–6, Sports Publishing LLC.
  2. ^ Maryland Game by Game Results, College Football Data Warehouse, retrieved July 24, 2010.
  3. ^ All-Time Lettermen, p. 17–22, 2007 Terrapin Football Record Book, University of Maryland, 2007.
  4. ^ a b c Alumni Record of the Maryland Agricultural College: 1914, Maryland Agricultural College, p. 42, 1914.
  5. ^ Michael Bannon, MSA SC 3520-1656, Archives of Maryland, Biographical Series, retrieved October 4, 2011.
  6. ^ a b Clifton E. Fuller, Ancestry.com, retrieved October 4, 2011.
  7. ^ 4,000 U. Of M. Alumni Due At Home-Coming Today, The Baltimore Sun, Oct 31, 1953.
  8. ^ Maryland's Second City; Mountains Mold Cumberland, The Baltimore Sun, May 12, 1946.
  9. ^ a b Oft-Repeated Story, Cumberland Times November 3, 1957.
  10. ^ Football, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, January 19, 1952.
  11. ^ Knights Of The Golden Eagle, The Baltimore Sun, May 30, 1909.
  12. ^ a b Alumni Record, p. 44.
  13. ^ a b Alumni Record, p. 54.
  14. ^ Bealle, p. 28.
  15. ^ Transactions of the American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum Engineers, Volume 41, p. xxxiv, American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum Engineers, 1911.
  16. ^ Alumni Record, p. 46.
  17. ^ a b Alumni Record, p. 52.
  18. ^ Alumni Record, p. 58.
  19. ^ Morris Allison Bealle, Kings of American Football: The University of Maryland, 1890–1952, p. 21, Columbia Publishing Co., 1952.
  20. ^ Alumni Record, p. 50.
  21. ^ Alumni Record, p. 48.
  22. ^ Barnes Compton, MSA SC 3520-1545, Archives of Maryland, Biographical Series, retrieved October 4, 2011.