1895 in Michigan

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Events from the year 1895 in Michigan.

Office holders[edit]

State office holders[edit]

Mayors of major cities[edit]

Federal office holders[edit]

Population[edit]

In the 1890 United States Census, Michigan was recorded as having a population of 2,093,890, ranking as the ninth most populous state in the country. By 1900, Michigan's population had increased by 15.6% to 2,420,982.

Cities[edit]

The following is a list of cities in Michigan with a population of at least 7,500 based on 1890 U.S. Census data. Historic census data from 1880 and 1900 is included to reflect trends in population increases or decreases. In recent decades, all of the state's most populous cities lie in the southern half of the lower peninsula. In 1890, owing largely to an economy based on extraction of natural resources, six of the state's largest cities were located north of 44° latitude; in the chart below, these cities are shaded in aqua.

1890
Rank
City County 1880 Pop. 1890 Pop. 1900 Pop. Change 1890-1900
1 Detroit Wayne 116,340 205,876 285,704 38.8%
2 Grand Rapids Kent 32,016 60,278 87,565 45.3%
3 Saginaw Saginaw 10,525 46,322 42,345 −8.6%
4 Bay City Bay 20,693 27,839 27,628 −0.8%
5 Muskegon Muskegon 11,262 22,702 20,818 −8.3%
6 Jackson Jackson 16,105 20,798 25,180 21.1%
7 Kalamazoo Kalamazoo 11,937 17,853 24,404 36.7%
8 Port Huron St. Clair 8,883 13,543 19,158 41.5%
9 Battle Creek Calhoun 7,063 13,197 18,563 40.7%
10 Lansing Ingham 8,319 13,102 16,485 25.8%
11 Manistee Manistee 6,930 12,812 14,260 11.3%
12 Alpena Alpena 6,153 11,283 11,802 4.6%
13 Menominee Menominee 3,288 10,630 12,818 20.6%
14 Flint Genesee 8,409 9,803 13,103 33.7%
15 Ann Arbor Washtenaw 8,061 9,431 14,509 53.8%
16 Marquette Marquette 4,690 9,098 10,058 10.6%
17 Adrian Lenawee 7,849 8,756 9,654 10.3%
18 Iron Mountain Dickinson -- 8,599 9,242 7.5%
19 Ironwood Gogebic -- 7,745 9,705 25.3%

[2]

Counties[edit]

The following is a list of counties in Michigan with populations of at least 35,000 based on 1890 U.S. Census data. Historic census data from 1880 and 1900 are included to reflect trends in population increases or decreases.

1890
Rank
County Largest city 1880 Pop. 1890 Pop. 1900 Pop. Change 1890-1900
1 Wayne Detroit 168,444 257,114 348,793 35.7%
2 Kent Grand Rapids 73,253 109,922 129,714 18.0%
3 Saginaw Saginaw 59,095 82,273 81,222 −1.3%
4 Bay Bay City 38,081 56,412 62,378 10.6%
5 St. Clair Port Huron 46,197 52,105 55,228 6.0%
6 Lenawee Adrian 48,343 48,448 48,406 −0.1%
7 Jackson Jackson 42,031 45,031 48,222 7.1%
8 Calhoun Battle Creek 38,452 43,501 49,315 13.4%
9 Washtenaw Ann Arbor 41,848 42,210 47,761 13.2%
10 Berrien Niles 36,785 41,285 49,165 19.1%
11 Oakland Pontiac 41,537 41,245 44,792 8.6%
12 Muskegon Muskegon 26,586 40,013 37,036 −7.4%
13 Marquette Marquette 25,394 39,521 41,239 4.3%
14 Genesee Flint 39,220 39,430 41,804 6.0%
15 Kalamazoo Kalamazoo 34,342 39,273 44,310 12.8%
16 Allegan Holland 37,815 38,961 38,812 −0.4%
17 Ingham Lansing 33,676 37,666 39,818 5.7%
18 Houghton Houghton 22,473 35,389 66,063 86.7%

[3]

Sports[edit]

Baseball[edit]

American football[edit]

Chronology of events[edit]

January[edit]

  • January 1 - John T. Rich was sworn in as Governor of Michigan in a ceremony at Lansing.[10]
  • January 23 - Both houses of the Michigan Legislature met in joint session for an election to fill Michigan's seats in the U.S. Senate. James McMillan was unanimously reelected a full term. Julius C. Burrows was elected for a term of four years.[11]
  • January 24 - Wreckage from the steamer Chicora was found in Lake Michigan from Benton Harbor to South Haven.[12] All 26 persons aboard the ship were lost in a winter storm,[13] and wreckage continued to drift ashore in the months that followed.[14]
  • January 26 - Contingents supporting and opposing Detroit Mayor Pingree clashed at the Detroit Auditorium over the Thompson health bill and a proposal in Lansing to strip the Mayor of the power to appoint a health commissioner. The Detroit Free Press called the clash of the two factions "a spectacle never before witnessed in this city or state."[15]

February[edit]

  • February 2 - Dr. Horace Eliot Pope was murdered in Detroit, his skull shattered to pieces by blows from a hatchet wielded by William Brusseau, a barber. Brusseau claimed he was defending himself and Pope's wife from an attack by Pope. The police alleged that the murder was motivated by life insurance on Pope.[16][17] Brusseau then changed his story and claimed that Mrs. Pope had murdered her husband after weeks of planning.[18][19] On June 4, the wife, Nellie Pope, was convicted of first degree murder and sentenced to life in prison.[20]
  • February 13 - Sen. McMillan proposed that Fort Mackinac, which had been decommissioned, be transferred to the State of Michigan for use as a park.[21] McMillan's plan was approved, and Mackinac Island State Park became the first state park in Michigan.

April[edit]

  • April 16 - The Detroit Free Press referred to the Detroit baseball club as the "Detroit Tigers" in the first use of the nickname for the club.[22]

May[edit]

  • May 1 - The Detroit baseball club opened its season with an 11-6 victory over Toledo. The game, played on a Wednesday afternoon, attracted a crowd of 6,267. The game was preceded by a parade led by Mayor Pingree through the streets of Detroit that was viewed by "tens of thousands." In a pregame ceremony marking the opening of the season, Western League President Ban Johnson presented Mayor Pingree with a ball. Former Detroit catcher Charlie Bennett, crippled in a train accident on e year earlier, was presented to a loud ovation, and Pingree threw the first pitch to him.[23]
  • May 8 - Woman protested at the State Capitol in advance of a vote on a bill granting women the right to vote. The bill narrowly failed to receiver the required super majority.[24]
  • May 13 - The cornerstone was laid for Detroit Central High School (now known as Old Main on Wayne State's campus. Mayor Pingree and 1,500 high school student attended the ceremony.[25]
  • May 19 - The United States Geological Survey's annual report on the world's iron ore resources showed that Michigan remained the country's leading producer with 4.4 million tons produced in 1894. Michigan had been the country's leading producer of iron ore for six consecutive years.[26]
  • May 31 - The steamer Norman, of the Menominee line, sunk with the loss of life of three crew members after it was struck by a Canadian boat Jack in heavy fog off Middle island in Lake Huron near Alpena.[27]

June[edit]

  • June 5 - Oscar C. Fischer, age 28 of Detroit's Fischer Brothers firm, was arrested after he shot and killed Hugh McAfee, a constable of Springwells Township, after a dispute two days earlier at Frank Hall's saloon. Fischer claimed he acted in self defense after McAfee attacked him.[28]
  • June 9 - A fire in Kalamazoo destroyed one of that city's most important business blocks, causing $300,000 in damage. The fire started at Dewing & Sons lumber yard, where two young men were suspected of starting the blaze. The fire was blown west along Burdick Street and north to a warehouse by the wind along Kalamazoo fire department was assisted by a unit from Battle Creek. There were no fatalities.[29]
  • June 12 - A contest for control of Michigan's Republican Party, between factions loyal to Detroit Mayor Hazen S. Pingree and Joseph M. Weiss ended in victory for the Pingree faction. Frank A. Rasch was chosen as the new party chairman, replacing Weiss.[30]

November[edit]

  • November - A. Baushke & Bro. announced plans to build a factory in Benton Harbor, Michigan, to build their horseless carriages under the name Benton Harbor Motor Carriage Company.[31] The Baushke automobile predated the earliest automobile of Henry Ford and is "believed to be the first motorized vehicle built completely from scratch."[32]

Births[edit]

  • February 18 - George Gipp, All-American football player for Notre Dame who was the subject of Knute Rockne's famous "Win just one for the Gipper" speech, in Laurium, Michigan

Deaths[edit]

  • March 5 - Charles Lanman, author of "The History of Michigan" and "Michigan Red Book", government official, artist, librarian, and explorer, at age 81 in Washington, D.C.[33]
  • March 20 - Philip St. George Cooke, U.S. Army cavalry officer who served as a Union General in the American Civil War, noted for his authorship of an Army cavalry manual, and sometimes called the "Father of the U.S. Cavalry", at age 85 in Detroit[34]
  • March 24 - James Battle, fire chief in Detroit for 35 years and namesake of the James Battle, in Detroit[35]
  • May 12 - Theodore H. Hinchman, a leading Detroit businessman, at age 78 in Detroit[36]
  • May 19 - William Adair, a Detroit resident since 1834, state senator and nursery operator, at age 80 in Detroit[37]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "Leave a Fine Record: The Retiring Michigan Members of Congress". Detroit Free Press. February 25, 1895. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  2. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States: 1930, Volume 1 Population. U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. 1930. pp. 512–514.
  3. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States: 1930, Volume 1 Population. U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. 1930. pp. 515–516.
  4. ^ a b "Western League Done". The Topeka Daily Capital. September 24, 1895. p. 3 – via Newspapers.com.
  5. ^ "1895 Detroit Tigers". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved July 11, 2017.
  6. ^ "2012 University of Michigan Baseball Record Book" (PDF). University of Michigan. 2012. pp. 22, 61. Retrieved August 9, 2017.
  7. ^ 2012 U-M Baseball Record Book, p. 13.
  8. ^ "1895 Football Team". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. Retrieved July 11, 2017.
  9. ^ "2015 Eastern Michigan Football Digital Media Guide" (PDF). Eastern Michigan University Football. pp. 158, 170. Retrieved June 30, 2016.
  10. ^ "Sworn In! Gov. Rich and State Officers Took the Oath of Office". Detroit Free Press. January 2, 1895. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  11. ^ "Doings At Lansing". The True Northerner. January 25, 1895. p. 3 – via Newspapers.com.
  12. ^ "Mourning! Many Families In Despair Over The Loss of The Chicora". Detroit Free Press. January 24, 1895. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  13. ^ "Chicora Went Down". The Ironwood Times. January 26, 1895. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  14. ^ "Cast Upon the Shore". The Palladium. April 19, 1895. p. 2.
  15. ^ "Twas Plain". Detroit Free Press. January 17, 1895. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  16. ^ "Horrible! Dr. Horace Eliot Pope Brutally Murdered". Detroit Free Press. February 3, 1895. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  17. ^ "The Murder of Dr. Pope". Detroit Free Press. February 4, 1895. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  18. ^ "Confessed! Brusseau Broke Down Completely Last Night". Detroit Free Press. February 5, 1895. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  19. ^ "She Did It! Brusseau Makes a Renewal of His Confession". Detroit Free Press. February 6, 1895. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  20. ^ "Murderess: Mrs. Nellie Pope So Branded by a Jury of Her Peers". Detroit Free Press. June 5, 1895. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  21. ^ "A Park for Michigan". Detroit Free Press. February 14, 1895. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  22. ^ "Notes of the Detroit Tigers for 1895". Detroit Free Press. April 16, 1895. p. 2 – via Newspapers.com.
  23. ^ "Victory: The Proud Bird Perched On The Detroit Club's Banner". Detroit Free Press. May 2, 1895. pp. 1, 2 – via Newspapers.com.
  24. ^ "Two Killed". Detroit Free Press. May 9, 2017 – via Newspapers.com.
  25. ^ "Well and Truly Laid: New Central High School Corner-Stone In Place". Detroit Free Press. May 14, 1895. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  26. ^ "Michigan Still On Top". Detroit Free Press. May 20, 1895. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  27. ^ "Fatality! Canadian Steamer Jack Cuts Into The Norman". Detroit Free Press. June 1, 1895. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  28. ^ "Shot Dead! Constable McAfee Murdered in Delray Last Night". Detroit Free Press. June 6, 1895. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  29. ^ "Kalamazoo's Big Loss". Detroit Free Press. June 10, 1895. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  30. ^ "Deposed! Joe Weiss Fired As Chairman By Pingree's Quorum". Detroit Free Press. June 13, 1895. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  31. ^ "Horseless Vehicles: Benton Harbor will have a Factory for Turning Out Motor Carriages". The Palladium. November 29, 1895. p. 2.
  32. ^ "Car Built in 1895 in Benton Harbor, MI, Still Runs". Import Car. March 29, 2010.
  33. ^ "Chas. Lanman Is Dead". Detroit Free Press. March 6, 1895. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  34. ^ "Famous Soldier Dead: Gen. Philip St. George Cooke Passes Away". Detroit Free Press. March 21, 1895. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  35. ^ "James Battle Is Dead". Detroit Free Press. March 25, 1895. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  36. ^ "T. H. Hinchman Is Dead". Detroit Free Press. May 13, 1895. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  37. ^ "An Old Resident Gone: William Adair Passed Away Yesterday Afternoon". Detroit Free Press. May 20, 1895. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.