1900 Penn Quakers football team

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1900 Penn Quakers football
Conference Independent
1900 record 12–1
Head coach George Washington Woodruff (9th season)
Captain Truxtun Hare
Home stadium Franklin Field
Seasons
← 1899
1901 →

The 1900 Penn Quakers football team represented the University of Pennsylvania in the 1900 college football season. The Quakers finished with a 12–1 record in their ninth year under head coach and College Football Hall of Fame inductee, George Washington Woodruff. Significant games included victories over Penn State (17–5), Chicago (41–0), Carlisle (16–6), and Navy (28–6), and a loss to Harvard (5–17). The 1900 Penn team outscored its opponents by a combined total of 335 to 45.[1][2] Four Penn players received recognition on the 1900 College Football All-America Team: guard Truxtun Hare (consensus 1st-team All-American);[3] tackle Blondy Wallace (Walter Camp, 2nd team); guard John Teas (Camp, 3rd team); and fullback Josiah McCracken (Camp, 3rd team).[4]

Schedule[edit]

Date Opponent Site Result Attendance Source
September 29 Lehigh W 27–6
October 3 Franklin & Marshall
  • Franklin Field
  • Philadelphia
W 47–0
October 6 Haverford
  • Franklin Field
  • Philadelphia
W 38–0
October 10 Dickinson
  • Franklin Field
  • Philadelphia
W 35–0
October 13 Brown
  • Franklin Field
  • Philadelphia
W 12–0
October 17 Penn State
  • Franklin Field
  • Philadelphia
W 17–5
October 20 Columbia
  • Franklin Field
  • Philadelphia
W 30–0
October 27 Chicago
  • Franklin Field
  • Philadelphia
W 41–0
November 3 at Harvard (rivalry)
L 5–17
November 10 Lafayette
  • Franklin Field
  • Philadelphia
W 12–5
November 17 Carlisle
  • Franklin Field
  • Philadelphia
W 16–6
November 21 at Navy W 28–6
November 29 Cornell (rivalry)
  • Franklin Field
  • Philadelphia
W 27–0

References[edit]

  1. ^ "1900 Pennsylvania Quakers Schedule and Results". SR/College Football. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved November 23, 2015. 
  2. ^ "Pennsylvania Yearly Results (1900-1904)". College Football Data Warehouse. David DeLassus. Retrieved November 23, 2015. 
  3. ^ "2014 NCAA Football Records: Consensus All-America Selections" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). 2014. p. 4. Retrieved August 16, 2014. 
  4. ^ "Walter Camp's 1900 All America Selections". Capital Times. 1930-11-23.