1901 Nashville Garnet and Blue football team

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1901 Nashville Garnet and Blue football
Conference Independent
1901 record 6–1–1
Head coach Charley Moran (2nd season)
Home stadium Peabody Field
Seasons
← 1900
1902 →

The 1901 Nashville Garnet and Blue football team represented the University of Nashville during the 1901 college football season. The second of first two opponents is unknown, the 1901 team was likely the best football team in Nashville's history. Coached by Charley Moran, though they lost to southern power Vanderbilt, they "mopped up with about everything else."[1]

Schedule[edit]

Date Time Opponent Site Result Attendance
October 2 at Mooney School* Franklin, Tennessee W 11–0  
October 5 at  W ?–?  
October 12 at Texas Dallas, Texas T 5–5  
October 19 Auburn Birmingham, Alabama W 23–5  
October 26 Tennessee Peabody Field • Nashville, Tennessee W 16–5  
November 2 Sewanee Peabody Field • Nashville, Tennessee W 39–6  
November 16 at Kentucky U. Lexington, Kentucky W 5–0  
November 27 2:00 p. m. vs. Vanderbilt Dudley FieldNashville, Tennessee L 0–10   5,000
*Non-conference game.

Season summary[edit]

at Mooney School[edit]

Nashville at Mooney School
1 2 Total
Nashville 11 0 11
Mooney 0 0 0

To open the season, Nashville defeated the Mooney School 11–0.[2]

The starting lineup was Choate (left end), Blackburn (left tackle), Majors (left guard) Hawkins (center), Peake (right guard), Keller (right tackle), Kuykendall (right end), Church (quarterback), Reeves (left halfback), F. White (right halfback), Holland (fullback).[2]

at Texas[edit]

Nashville at Texas
1 2 Total
Nashville 0 5 5
Texas 5 0 5

Nashville tied the Texas Longhorns 5–5, in front of what was then the largest crowd ever to see a game in Dallas.[3]

The starting lineup was Choate (left end), Blackborn (left tackle), Peake (left guard) Hawkins (center), Majors (right guard), Keller (right tackle), Kuykendall (right end), Pollard (quarterback), Reeves (left halfback), F. White (right halfback), Biddle (fullback).[3]

Auburn[edit]

Nashville upset Auburn 23–5.

Tennessee[edit]

Nashville surprised again and beat Tennessee 16–5. Tennessee had just come off a tie of Clemson, when Clemson had in turn come off a 122–0 victory on opening day.

Sewanee[edit]

Sewanee at Nashville
1 2 Total
Sewanee 6 0 6
Nashville 11 28 39
  • Date: November 2
  • Location: Peabody Field
    Nashville, Tennessee
  • Game start: 3:00 p. m.
  • Referee: George W. Rowbotham (Memphis)

Sources:[4]

Arguably the year's biggest win, Nashville kept up its win streak and beat Sewanee 39–6, then the worst defeat ever suffered by Sewanee. Nashville simply outweighed the Tigers.[4] Ormond Simkins scored first. Biddle once got a touchdown on a 35-yard run.[4]

The starting lineup was Choate (left end), Blackburn (left tackle), Majors (left guard) Hankins (center), Peake (right guard), Keller (right tackle), Kuykendall (right end), Pollard (quarterback), Reeves (left halfback), F. White (right halfback), Biddle (fullback).[4]

at Kentucky U.[edit]

Nashville beat state champion Kentucky University in Lexington 5–0. Kentucky governor J. C. W. Beckham made a 15-yard kick to ceremonially start the contest. Fullback Bidwell made the touchdown.[5]

at Vanderbilt[edit]

Nashville vs. Vanderbilt
1 2 Total
Nashville 0 0 0
Vanderbilt 5 5 10

Three Nashville players were ruled ineligible,[6] the Commodores practiced in secret for ten days in preparation. Vanderbilt faced Nashville on Thanksgiving Day and won 10–0 in front of 4 to 5,000 spectators,[7] using "Harvard tactics."[8] After thirty minutes of gameplay, John Edgerton scored a touchdown taking the wind out of the sails of Nashville rooters. A riot broke out downtown the next day. According to the account of the event in the Nashville Banner (repudiated in the Hustler), the trouble started when a number of Vanderbilt students "tried to paint the stone fence of the University of Nashville yellow and black."[9]

The starting lineup was Choate (left end), Blackborn (left tackle), Majors (left guard) Hankins (center), Peake (right guard), Keller (right tackle), Kuykendall (right end), Pollard (quarterback), Reeves (left halfback), F. White (right halfback), Biddle (fullback).[7]

Postseason[edit]

Amidst charges of professionalism, Nashville was blacklisted from the SIAA.[10][11][12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Brown Calls Vanderbilt '06 Best Eleven South Ever Had". Atlanta Constitution. February 19, 1911. p. 52. Retrieved March 8, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  2. ^ a b "University of Nashville – Local foot ball eleven wins first game of season". The Nashville American. October 3, 1901. Retrieved November 4, 2016 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  3. ^ a b "Texas 5, Nashville 5". The Houston Post. October 13, 1901. Retrieved August 31, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  4. ^ a b c d "Varsity Goes Downpage=1". Sewanee Purple. 18 (13). November 5, 1901. 
  5. ^ "Governor Beckham Kicks and Spirited Games Begin". Atlanta Constitution. November 17, 1901. p. 8. Retrieved August 31, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  6. ^ "Three Ineligible Removed". The Courier-Journal. November 21, 1901. p. 8. Retrieved December 22, 2016 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  7. ^ a b "Dixie Championship Goes To Vanderbilt". Atlanta Constitution. November 29, 1901. p. 2. Retrieved July 31, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  8. ^ "Vanderbilt Used Harvard Tactics". Detroit Free Press. November 29, 1901. p. 8. Retrieved May 14, 2016 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  9. ^ Bill Carey. "Stargazing, Vanderbilt football and 'Bachelor of Ugliness' reigned 100 years ago". Retrieved March 8, 2015. 
  10. ^ "Will Meet At Chapel Hill". Asheville Citizen. December 11, 1901. p. 4. Retrieved August 29, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  11. ^ "Athletic Blacklist Has Widespread Effect". The Charlotte News. December 14, 1901. p. 11. Retrieved August 29, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  12. ^ "Fight Is Against Professionalism". Atlanta Constitution. December 22, 1901. p. 11. Retrieved August 29, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read