1906 Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets football team

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1906 Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets football
1906GaTech.jpg
Heisman is holding his pet dog "Woo".
Conference Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association
1906 record 6–3–1 (4–3 SIAA)
Head coach John Heisman (3rd season)
Captain E. C. Davies
Home stadium The Flats, future site of Grant Field
Seasons
← 1905
1907 →
1906 SIAA football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
Vanderbilt + 5 0 0     8 1 0
Clemson + 4 0 1     4 0 3
Sewanee 5 1 0     8 1 0
Alabama 3 1 0     5 1 0
Texas A&M 2 1 0     6 1 0
Ole Miss 3 2 0     4 2 0
Georgia Tech 4 3 0     6 3 1
Texas 1 1 0     9 1 0
Davidson 1 1 1     3 2 2
Georgia 2 3 1     2 4 1
Mississippi A&M 0 2 1     2 2 1
LSU 0 2 1     2 2 2
Mercer 0 2 0     1 4 0
Tennessee 0 3 1     1 6 2
Tulane 0 3 0     0 4 1
Auburn 0 5 0     1 5 1
Cumberland            
Nashville            
  • + – Conference co-champions

The 1906 Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets football team represented the Georgia Institute of Technology during the 1906 Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association football season. In the third season under coach John Heisman, Georgia Tech posted a 6–3–1 record.

Before the season[edit]

In no small part thanks to Heisman, the forward pass was legalized in 1906.

Schedule[edit]

Date Opponent Site Result
September 29 Maryville* The Flats • Atlanta, GA T 6–6  
October 6 North Georgia* The Flats • Atlanta, GA W 11–0  
October 13 Chattanooga* The Flats • Atlanta, GA W 18–0  
October 20 Sewanee The Flats • Atlanta, GA L 0–16  
October 27 Davidson The Flats • Atlanta, GA W 4–0  
November 3 Auburn The Flats • Atlanta, GA (Rivalry) W 11–0  
November 10 Georgia The Flats • Atlanta, GA (Rivalry) W 17–0  
November 17 Vanderbilt The Flats • Atlanta, GA L 6–37  
November 24 at Mercer Macon, GA W 61–0  
November 29 Clemson The Flats • Atlanta, GA (Rivalry) L 0–10  
*Non-conference game.

[1][2]

Game summaries[edit]

Maryville[edit]

Maryville at Georgia Tech
1 2 Total
Maryville 0 6 6
Ga Tech 0 6 6
  • Location: The Flats • Atlanta, GA
  • Referee: O'Donnell

Sources:

Under the new rules, Maryville surprised Tech with a tie, 6–6.[3]

The starting lineup was: Hightower (left end), Monroe (left tackle), Bell (left guard), Luck (center), Henderson (right guard), McCarty (right tackle), Hill (right end), Robert (quarterback), Davids (left halfback), Means (right halfback), Sweet (fullback).[3]

North Georgia[edit]

In the second week of play, Tech defeated North Georgia 11–0.

Chattanooga[edit]

Against Chattanooga, Tech won 18–0 .

Sewanee[edit]

Sewanee defeated Georgia Tech 16–0, the game's account is the first involving the jump shift.[4] The starting lineup was Brown (left end), Luck (left tackle), Bell (left guard), Monroe (center), Smith (right guard), McCarty (right tackle), Hill (right end), Robert (quarterback), Hightower (left halfback), Davies (right halfback), Sweet (fullback).

Davidson[edit]

Davidson at Georgia Tech
1 2 Total
Davidson 0 0 0
Ga Tech 4 0 4

Sources:

Lob Brown was responsible for the win over Davidson by a 40-yard field goal.[5]

Auburn[edit]

Brown also helped in the victory over rival Auburn, the school's first.[6]

Georgia[edit]

"Tech's cup of joy overflowed" as they defeated rival Georgia 17–0. An ambitious game with Vanderbilt was scheduled.[7]

Vanderbilt[edit]

Vanderbilt at Georgia Tech
1 2 Total
Vanderbilt 23 14 37
Ga Tech 0 6 6

Sources:[8]

Vanderbilt defeated Tech in the rain and mud of Atlanta 37–6.[9] Lobster Brown scored Tech's points.[8] Atlanta Constitution sportswriter Alex Lynn wrote after the game that Owsley Manier was: "the greatest fullback and all round man ever seen in Atlanta."[8] He again scored five touchdowns.

The starting lineup was: Brown (left end); McCarty (left tackle); Snyder (left guard); Monroe (center); Henderson (right guard); Luck (right tackle); Brown (right end); Robert (quarterback); Davies (left halfback); Hightower (right halfback); Adamson (fullback).[8]

Mercer[edit]

The season's largest win came over Mercer, 61–0 .

Clemson[edit]

The season ended with a disappointing, 10–0 loss to Clemson. Fritz Furtick scored Clemson's first touchdown.[10] Baseball star Ty Cobb attended the game.[11]

Postseason[edit]

At season's end, Brown was elected captain for next season.[12][13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Georgia Tech Media Guide". 
  2. ^ "1906 Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets Schedule and Results - College Football at Sports-Reference.com". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. 
  3. ^ a b Alex Lynn (September 30, 1906). "Yellow jackets Tied by Maryville eleven". The Atlanta Constitution. p. 1. Retrieved January 19, 2017 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  4. ^ Woodruff 1928, p. 189
  5. ^ ""Lobster" Brown". Atlanta Constitution. October 28, 1906. p. 1. Retrieved March 8, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  6. ^ Wiley Lee Umphlett (1992). Creating the Big Game: John W. Heisman and the Invention of American Football. p. 92. 
  7. ^ Woodruff 1928, p. 192
  8. ^ a b c d Alex Lynn (November 18, 1906). "Brown's Toe and the Wet Cave Score". Atlanta Constitution. p. 1. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved May 11, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  9. ^ "The times dispatch. (Richmond, Va.) 1903-1914, November 18, 1906, SPORTING SECTION, Image 25". 1906-11-18. ISSN 1941-0700. Retrieved 2018-03-19. 
  10. ^ Woodruff 1928, p. 196
  11. ^ Hornbaker, Tim (7 April 2015). "War on the Basepaths: The Definitive Biography of Ty Cobb". Skyhorse Publishing, Inc. – via Google Books. 
  12. ^ ""Lobster" Brown Will Make Fine Leader For Tech Team". Atlanta Georgian. December 17, 1906. 
  13. ^ John F. Stegeman. The Ghosts of Herty Field: Early Days on a Southern Gridiron. p. 77. 
  • Woodruff, Fuzzy (1928). A History of Southern Football 1890–1928. 1.