1906 Naef

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1906 Naef
Discovery [1]
Discovered by P. Wild
Discovery site Zimmerwald Obs.
Discovery date 5 September 1972
Designations
MPC designation (1906) Naef
Named after
Robert A. Naef
(amateur astronomer)[2]
1972 RC · 1943 VF
1952 DG1 · 1965 WF
main-belt · Vestoid [3]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 51.33 yr (18,749 days)
Aphelion 2.6944 AU
Perihelion 2.0517 AU
2.3731 AU
Eccentricity 0.1354
3.66 yr (1,335 days)
94.839°
0° 16m 10.56s / day
Inclination 6.4757°
354.84°
14.485°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 6.64 km (calculated)[3]
7.923±0.090[4]
8.057±0.083 km[5]
11.00818±0.00001 h[6]
11.009±0.0012 h[a]
11.0090±0.0002 h[7]
11.03±0.02 h[8]
0.2282±0.0466[5]
0.234±0.052[4]
0.4 (assumed)[3]
SQ [9] · V[3]
12.5[1][3] · 12.7[5] · 13.36±0.31[9]

1906 Naef, provisional designation 1972 RC, is a stony vestoid asteroid from the inner regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 7 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 5 September 1972, by Swiss astronomer Paul Wild at Zimmerwald Observatory near Bern, Switzerland.[10] It was later named after Swiss banker and amateur astronomer Robert Naef.[2]

Orbit and classification[edit]

Naef orbits the Sun in the inner main-belt at a distance of 2.1–2.7 AU once every 3 years and 8 months (1,335 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.14 and an inclination of 6° with respect to the ecliptic.[1] The body's observation arc begins with its official discovery observation at Zimmerwald, as previous observation at Turku Observatory (1943 VF) and McDonald Observatory (1952 DG1) in 1943 and 1952, respectively, remain unused.[10]

Physical characteristics[edit]

According to observations by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer's NEOWISE mission, Naef measures 7.9 and 8.1 kilometers in diameter, and its surface has an albedo of 0.23,[4][5] while the Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link assumes an albedo of 0.40 and calculates a diameter of 6.6 kilometer with an absolute magnitude of 12.5.[3]

Naef is a vestoid or V-type asteroid, with its spectral type comparable to that of the group's namesake, 4 Vesta. V-type asteroids are less common than the abundant S-type asteroids, but they are similar in their stony composition, except for their higher concentration of pyroxenes, an aluminium-rich silicate mineral. PanSTARRS' photometric survey has characterized it as a SQ-type that transitions to the Q-type asteroids.[9]

Four rotational lightcurves, obtained during 2005–2009, gave a well-defined rotation period between 11.01 and 11.03 hours, and a brightness variation of 0.92–0.95 magnitude (U=n.a./3/n.a./2+).[6][7][8][a]

Naming[edit]

This minor planet was named after Swiss banker Robert A. Naef (1907–1975) from Zürich, an ardent amateur astronomer, who produced the yearly observers almanac, Der Sternenhimmel, since 1940.[2] The official naming citation was published by the Minor Planet Center before November 1977 (M.P.C. 4157).[11]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Pravec (2005) web: rotation period 11.009±0.0012 hours with a brightness amplitude of 0.92 mag. Summary figures at Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link (CALL) for (1906) Naef

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1906 Naef (1972 RC)" (2017-03-21 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 9 June 2017.
  2. ^ a b c Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1906) Naef. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 153. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 11 December 2016.
  3. ^ a b c d e f "LCDB Data for (1906) Naef". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 11 December 2016.
  4. ^ a b c Masiero, Joseph R.; Grav, T.; Mainzer, A. K.; Nugent, C. R.; Bauer, J. M.; Stevenson, R.; et al. (August 2014). "Main-belt Asteroids with WISE/NEOWISE: Near-infrared Albedos". The Astrophysical Journal. 791 (2): 11. arXiv:1406.6645. Bibcode:2014ApJ...791..121M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/791/2/121. Retrieved 11 December 2016.
  5. ^ a b c d Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Hand, E.; Bauer, J.; Tholen, D.; et al. (November 2011). "NEOWISE Studies of Spectrophotometrically Classified Asteroids: Preliminary Results" (PDF). The Astrophysical Journal. 741 (2): 25. arXiv:1109.6407. Bibcode:2011ApJ...741...90M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/741/2/90. Retrieved 11 December 2016.
  6. ^ a b Durech, J.; Hanus, J.; Oszkiewicz, D.; Vanco, R. (March 2016). "Asteroid models from the Lowell photometric database". Astronomy and Astrophysics. 587: 6. arXiv:1601.02909. Bibcode:2016A&A...587A..48D. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201527573. Retrieved 11 December 2016.
  7. ^ a b Durkee, Russell I.; Pravec, Petr (June 2007). "The Lightcurve of Asteroid 1906 NAEF". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 34 (2): 49. Bibcode:2007MPBu...34...49D. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 11 December 2016.
  8. ^ a b Polishook, David (April 2010). "Lightcurves and Spin Periods from the Wise Observatory - 2009". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 37 (2): 65–69. Bibcode:2010MPBu...37...65P. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 11 December 2016.
  9. ^ a b c Veres, Peter; Jedicke, Robert; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Denneau, Larry; Granvik, Mikael; Bolin, Bryce; et al. (November 2015). "Absolute magnitudes and slope parameters for 250,000 asteroids observed by Pan-STARRS PS1 - Preliminary results". Icarus. 261: 34–47. arXiv:1506.00762. Bibcode:2015Icar..261...34V. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2015.08.007. Retrieved 11 December 2016.
  10. ^ a b "1906 Naef (1972 RC)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 11 December 2016.
  11. ^ "MPC/MPO/MPS Archive". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 11 December 2016.

External links[edit]